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Bezabih Ayele, M. & Stage, J. (2019). How much is too much?: Individual biodiversity conservation. Economics Bulletin, 39(1), 247-255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How much is too much?: Individual biodiversity conservation
2019 (English)In: Economics Bulletin, ISSN 1545-2921, E-ISSN 1545-2921, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 247-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The individual farmer has little incentive to care about the public good properties of on-farm biodiversity in the formof different crop varieties. There is a common assumption that, because of this, farmers will tend to maintain too littlebiodiversity on their farms compared with the social optimum. However, in developing countries, this assumption doesnot fit with the empirical data: because of poorly functioning insurance markets, farmers tend to maintain a wide rangeof different crop varieties to hedge against weather shocks and other uncertainties. In this paper we develop atheoretical model to account for this apparent contradiction, and show that farmers may in fact even maintain toomuch biodiversity on their farms, compared with the social optimum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Economics Bulletin, 2019
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72374 (URN)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencySwedish Research Council FormasThe Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation
Note

Validerad;Nivå 2;2019-03-08 (oliekm)

Available from: 2018-12-27 Created: 2018-12-27 Last updated: 2019-03-08Bibliographically approved
Lindman, Å. & Stage, J. (2018). Avståndsskatters effekt för Norrbotten: En konsekvensanalys. Luleå: Region Norrbotten
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Avståndsskatters effekt för Norrbotten: En konsekvensanalys
2018 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Region Norrbotten, 2018. p. 36
Series
Rapportserie inom Regional förnyelse
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70781 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved
Andersson, C. & Stage, J. (2018). Direct and indirect effects of waste management policies on household waste behaviour: The case of Sweden. Waste Management, 76, 19-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct and indirect effects of waste management policies on household waste behaviour: The case of Sweden
2018 (English)In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 76, p. 19-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Swedish legislation makes municipalities responsible for recycling or disposing of household waste. Municipalities therefore play an important role in achieving Sweden’s increased levels of ambition in the waste management area and in achieving the goal of a more circular economy. This paper studies how two municipal policy instruments – weight-based waste tariffs and special systems for the collection of food waste – affect the collected volumes of different types of waste. We find that a system of collecting food waste separately is more effective overall than imposing weight-based waste tariffs in respect not only of reducing the amounts of waste destined for incineration, but also of increasing materials recycling and biological recovery, despite the fact that the direct incentive effects of these two systems  should be similar. Separate food waste collection was associated with increased recycling not only of food waste but also of other waste. Introducing separate food waste collection indirectly signals to households that recycling is important and desirable, and our results suggest that this signalling effect may be as important as direct incentive effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
food waste collection, signalling, Sweden, waste management, waste tariffs
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68052 (URN)10.1016/j.wasman.2018.03.038 (DOI)000435064000002 ()29605305 (PubMedID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-05-28 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2018-07-26Bibliographically approved
Muchapondwa, E., Stage, J., Mungatana, E. & Kumar, P. (2018). Lessons from applying market-based incentives in watershed management. Water Economics and Policy, 4(3), Article ID 1850011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lessons from applying market-based incentives in watershed management
2018 (English)In: Water Economics and Policy, ISSN 2382-624X, E-ISSN 2382-6258, Vol. 4, no 3, article id 1850011Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Watershed management is a complex activity with constraints on funding and human resources in many parts of the world, and there is a need for global effort to identify strategies that can work. To complement regulatory approaches, attention is now also being given to market-based incentives because of their potential cost-effectiveness. This study seeks to provide impetus to the use of the most successful market-based incentives to promote sustainable watershed practices through strengthening and increasing direct participation by local communities and the private sector. To identify proven market-based incentives for use to catalyze local community and private sector participation, a review of a sample of 26 purposively selected case studies from different contexts in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas is conducted. In reviewing those case studies, emphasis is placed on understanding the threats to specific watersheds, the market-based incentives used, the countrywide policy environment, the outcomes from the interventions, the factors for success and failure, and the pertinent policy issues in support of upscaling and the uptake of appropriate market-based approaches. The study identifies seven key policies that Governments should consider to upscale and facilitate the uptake of market-based incentives to promote participation by local communities and the private sector in watershed management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Scientific, 2018
Keywords
Local communities; market-based incentives; private sector; watershed management
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-67342 (URN)10.1142/S2382624X1850011X (DOI)000439965300008 ()
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-08-08 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2018-01-22 Created: 2018-01-22 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Stage, J. & Uwera, C. (2018). Prospects for establishing environmental satellite accounts in a developing country: The case of Rwanda. Journal of Cleaner Production, 200, 219-230
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prospects for establishing environmental satellite accounts in a developing country: The case of Rwanda
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 200, p. 219-230Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we discuss the beginning of Rwanda’s current work on natural capital accounts. Many developing countries began similar work on environmental satellite accounts in the 1990s and early 2000s, only to abandon them a few years later when the initial political interest waned. The question arises, therefore, as to whether renewed interest in these accounts has the potential to have a longer-lasting impact on national accounting practices. In Rwanda’s case, the decision was to begin satellite accounting work by focusing on resources where key economic trade-offs between different uses had already begun to be identified by policymakers, and where the gathering of economic statistics had already been improved as a result. It seems likely that this approach could lead to more durable satellite accounts, and that a similar approach would be feasible in many other countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
environmental accounting; natural capital accounting; Rwanda; System of Environmental-Economic Accounting; Wealth Accounting and the Valuation of Ecosystem Services
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70175 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.07.274 (DOI)000445715400020 ()2-s2.0-85053083276 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius FoundationSida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencySwedish Research Council Formas
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-08-07 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-07-27 Created: 2018-07-27 Last updated: 2018-10-12Bibliographically approved
Kassie, M., Stage, J., Diiro, G., Muriithi, B., Muricho, G., Ledermann, S. T., . . . Khan, Z. (2018). Push-pull farming system in Kenya: Implications for economic and social welfare. Land use policy, 77, 186-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Push-pull farming system in Kenya: Implications for economic and social welfare
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2018 (English)In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 77, p. 186-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines the farm-level economic benefits and aggregate welfare impacts of adopting push–pull technology (PPT)—an innovative, integrated pest and soil-fertility management strategy—with a set of household- and plot-level data collected in western Kenya. The evaluation is based on a combination of econometric and economic surplus analysis. Treatment effect estimates are used to assess the technology-induced shift in the maize supply curve, which is then used as an input to the economic surplus analysis. Finally, the aggregate poverty impact is computed using the economic surplus estimates. We observe that the adoption of PPT led to significant increases in maize yield and net maize income. The technology has significant potential benefit in terms of increasing economic surplus and reducing the number of people considered poor in western Kenya. Important factors influencing the decision to adopt PPT included access to information, household education, social capital, and social networks. We conclude that effective policies and development programmes for promoting PPT in Kenya should include information delivery and education mechanisms that are more effective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
economic surplus, farm-level impact, Kenya, maize, poverty, push–pull technology
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68863 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2018.05.041 (DOI)000442067100019 ()2-s2.0-85047639440 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-05-29 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-09-10Bibliographically approved
Stage, J. & Uwera, C. (2018). Social cohesion in Rwanda: Results from a public good experiment. Development Policy Review, 36(5), 577-586
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social cohesion in Rwanda: Results from a public good experiment
2018 (English)In: Development Policy Review, ISSN 0950-6764, E-ISSN 1467-7679, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 577-586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We describe a public good experiment, a type of economic experiment commonly used to examine feelings of prosociality and community cohesion, carried out in Rwanda. Contributions in different parts of the country are affected by the local intensity of the 1994 genocide, with more generous contributions being made in areas where violence was greater. This supports earlier research indicating that conflict experience leads to greater prosociality. However, we also find that people who have not, themselves, been targets of violence give lower contributions than people who have. The considerable group-related and regional differences in social behaviour may have implications for the country's policies to deal with social cohesion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
common property management, conflict experience, public good experiment, Rwanda, social cohesion
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63431 (URN)10.1111/dpr.12291 (DOI)000440548500004 ()2-s2.0-85054321539 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasThe Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius FoundationSida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-08-08 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-05-18 Created: 2017-05-18 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Lindmark, M., Nguyen Thu, H. & Stage, J. (2018). Weak support for weak sustainability: Genuine savings and long-term wellbeing in Sweden, 1850 – 2000. Ecological Economics, 145, 339-345
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weak support for weak sustainability: Genuine savings and long-term wellbeing in Sweden, 1850 – 2000
2018 (English)In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 145, p. 339-345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study genuine savings as an indicator of long-term welfare for Sweden for the period 1850 to 2000. Sweden has developed long series of comprehensive ‘green’ national accounts for this entire period and is, therefore, interesting as a testing ground for the hypotheses linking green accounting and sustainability. We find support for the weakest of the hypotheses in the theoretical literature on weak sustainability and genuine savings, namely that genuine savings are correlated with future economic well-being. However, the stronger hypotheses in this literature are not supported: there is no one-to-one relationship between genuine savings and prosperity, there is no indication that the relationship becomes stronger for longer time horizons, or with more comprehensive savings measures. The findings suggest that genuine savings, at least as currently measured in national accounts and satellite accounts, may not be a good forward-looking indicator of future prosperity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Genuine savings, green national accounting, weak sustainability, historical national accounts, Sweden
National Category
Economic History Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66586 (URN)10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.11.015 (DOI)2-s2.0-85034601587 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Yesterday’s wealth and the wellbeing of tomorrow
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-12-05 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-11-15 Created: 2017-11-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Ek, K., Goytia, S., Lundmark, C., Nysten-Haarala, S., Pettersson, M., Sandström, A., . . . Stage, J. (2017). Challenges in Swedish hydropower: politics, economics and rights. Research Ideas and Outcomes, 3, Article ID e21305.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges in Swedish hydropower: politics, economics and rights
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2017 (English)In: Research Ideas and Outcomes, E-ISSN 2367-7163, Vol. 3, article id e21305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two systems working in parallel have contributed to implementation difficulties in Swedish water governance. While the old system is designed to be predictable and stable over time, the new system is intended to be transparent and holistic, guided by the principles of Integrated Water Resource Management. The paper disentangles the challenges in Swedish water governance and proposes a blueprint for future research. The proposed research project is unique in the sense that it explores the imbalances between the new and the old water governance systems from a multi-disciplinary perspective, elaborating upon the clashes between the traditional, nationally based regulatory system and the new holistic water governance system from legal, political and economic perspectives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pensoft Publishers, 2017
National Category
Economics Law and Society Political Science Law (excluding Law and Society) Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Economics; Law; Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66029 (URN)10.3897/rio.3.e21305 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-10-10 Created: 2017-10-10 Last updated: 2018-11-20Bibliographically approved
Andersson, C. & Stage, J. (2017). Direct and indirect effects of waste management policies on household waste behaviour: The case of Sweden. Stockholm: Konjunkturinstitutet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct and indirect effects of waste management policies on household waste behaviour: The case of Sweden
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Konjunkturinstitutet, 2017. p. 22
Series
National Institute of Economic Research Working Paper, ISSN 1650-996X ; 148
Keywords
food waste collection, signalling, Sweden, waste management, waste tariffs
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62958 (URN)
Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7206-6568

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