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Martin-Torres, JavierORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6479-2236
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 214) Show all publications
Vakkada Ramachandran, A., Zorzano Mier, M.-P. & Martín-Torres, J. (2022). Numerical heat transfer study of a space environmental testing facility using COMSOL Multiphysics. Thermal Science and Engineering Progress, 29, Article ID 101205.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Numerical heat transfer study of a space environmental testing facility using COMSOL Multiphysics
2022 (English)In: Thermal Science and Engineering Progress, ISSN 2451-9049, Vol. 29, article id 101205Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental chambers are used to test the expected performance of space instrumentation and to investigate certain processes which are relevant in space or other planetary environments. In this study, a computational model of an existing Martian experimental facility is investigated numerically using COMSOL Multiphysics. For this purpose, we simulate the near surface water cycle under Martian temperature and pressure experimental conditions as tested inside the chamber and we compare the simulations with the experimental data. The model shows good agreement with experiments on the equilibration time scales and thermal gradients. Due to the imposibility to place sensors at multiple locations inside the chamber, we use the model to extrapolate the one-point relative humidity of the experimental data to each grid points in the simulation. This model gives an understanding of the gradient in atmospheric water relative humidity to which the experimental samples such as deliquescent salts and Martian regolith simulants are exposed at different time intervals. The of the performance of HABIT instrument during the tests, of the ESA/IKI ExoMars 2022 robotic mission to Mars, when compared with the model shows the existence of an extra internal heating source of about 1 W which can be attributed to the hydration and deliquescence of the salts exposed to Martian conditions when in contact with atmospheric moisture. In addition, the presented model is used to predict the thermal gradients and understand the time response when the chamber is heated in vacuum conditions. Our analysis shows that for thermal vacuum tests, the chamber will take about 2.5 h to reach the test temperature of 420 K.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
3D model, Heat transfer, Mars, Space chamber, Test facility, Vacuum
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-89006 (URN)10.1016/j.tsep.2022.101205 (DOI)000788023300008 ()2-s2.0-85124020499 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsWallenberg Foundations
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-02-22 (hanlid);

Funder: Agencia Estatal de Investigacion (MDM-2017-0737); Unidad de Excelencia “María de Maeztu” – Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA); Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion (PID2019-104205GB-C21)

Available from: 2022-01-30 Created: 2022-01-30 Last updated: 2022-07-04Bibliographically approved
Martin-Torres, J., Zorzano Mier, M.-P., Nyberg, E., Vakkada Ramachandran, A. & Bhardwaj, A. (2021). Brine-Induced Tribocorrosion Accelerates Wear on Stainless Steel: Implications for Mars Exploration. Advances in Astronomy, 2021, Article ID 6441233.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brine-Induced Tribocorrosion Accelerates Wear on Stainless Steel: Implications for Mars Exploration
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2021 (English)In: Advances in Astronomy, ISSN 1687-7969, E-ISSN 1687-7977, Vol. 2021, article id 6441233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tribocorrosion is a degradation phenomenon of material surfaces subjected to the combined action of mechanical loading and corrosion attack caused by the environment. Although corrosive chemical species such as materials like chloride atoms, chlorides, and perchlorates have been detected on the Martian surface, there is a lack of studies of its impact on materials for landed spacecraft and structures that will support surface operations on Mars. Here, we present a series of experiments on the stainless-steel material of the ExoMars 2020 Rosalind Franklin rover wheels. We show how tribocorrosion induced by brines accelerates wear on the materials of the wheels. Our results do not compromise the nominal ExoMars mission but have implications for future long-term surface operations in support of future human exploration or extended robotic missions on Mars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2021
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear) Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science; Machine Elements
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-89056 (URN)10.1155/2021/6441233 (DOI)000741080300001 ()2-s2.0-85122873012 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-01-31 (johcin);

Special Issue: Mars Climate Evolution, Habitability, Astrobiology, and Resources

Available from: 2022-01-31 Created: 2022-01-31 Last updated: 2022-04-12Bibliographically approved
Gebhardt, C., Abuelgasim, A., Fonseca, R., Martin-Torres, J. & Zorzano Mier, M.-P. (2021). Characterizing Dust‐Radiation Feedback and Refining the Horizontal Resolution of the MarsWRF Model down to 0.5 Degree. Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, 126(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterizing Dust‐Radiation Feedback and Refining the Horizontal Resolution of the MarsWRF Model down to 0.5 Degree
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, ISSN 2169-9097, E-ISSN 2169-9100, Vol. 126, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, three simulations by the Mars Weather Research and Forecasting (MarsWRF) model are compared: two 10 Martian Year (MY) 2° × 2° simulations with (i) fully radiatively‐active dust and (ii) a prescribed dust scenario, and a (iii) 1 MY 0.5° × 0.5° simulation with prescribed dust as in (ii). From comparing (i) and (ii), we found that the impact of dust‐radiation feedback is individually different for any region. The most striking evidence are major dust lifting activities to the south of Chryse Planitia (S‐CP) seen in (i) but not in (ii). By contrast, dust lifting and deposition on the southern slopes and inside the Hellas Basin are similar in both simulations. The latter, in turn, points towards a similar near‐surface atmospheric circulation. In (iii), the total global amount of wind stress lifted dust is by a factor of ∼8 higher than in (ii), with S‐CP being a major lifting region as in (i). Nonetheless, the surface dust lifting by wind stress in (iii) may be also reduced regionally, as seen at the peak of Elysium Mons because of its unique topography. The zonal mean circulation in (i) is generally of a comparable strength to that in (ii), with exceptions in global dust storm years, when it is clearly stronger in (i), in line with a dustier atmosphere. The differences in the zonal mean circulation between (ii) and (iii) are mostly at lower altitudes, and may arise due to differences in the representation of the topography.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
dust cycle, dust‐radiation feedback, interactive dust, MarsWRF model, model resolution, prescribed dust
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-83108 (URN)10.1029/2020JE006672 (DOI)000636359500022 ()2-s2.0-85103561237 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-03-22 (johcin)

Available from: 2021-03-01 Created: 2021-03-01 Last updated: 2021-05-10Bibliographically approved
Vakkada Ramachandran, A., Zorzano Mier, M.-P. & Martín-Torres, J. (2021). Experimental Investigation of the Atmosphere-Regolith Water Cycle on Present-Day Mars. Sensors, 21(21), Article ID 7421.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental Investigation of the Atmosphere-Regolith Water Cycle on Present-Day Mars
2021 (English)In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 21, no 21, article id 7421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The water content of the upper layers of the surface of Mars is not yet quantified. Laboratory simulations are the only feasible way to investigate this in a controlled way on Earth, and then compare it with remote and in situ observations of spacecrafts on Mars. Describing the processes that may induce changes in the water content of the surface is critical to determine the present-day habitability of the Martian surface, to understand the atmospheric water cycle, and to estimate the efficiency of future water extraction procedures from the regolith for In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). This paper illustrates the application of the SpaceQ facility to simulate the near-surface water cycle under Martian conditions. Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) observations at Gale crater show a non-equilibrium situation in the atmospheric H2O volume mixing ratio (VMR) at night-time, and there is a decrease in the atmospheric water content by up to 15 g/m2 within a few hours. This reduction suggests that the ground may act at night as a cold sink scavenging atmospheric water. Here, we use an experimental approach to investigate the thermodynamic and kinetics of water exchange between the atmosphere, a non-porous surface (LN2-chilled metal), various salts, Martian regolith simulant, and mixtures of salts and simulant within an environment which is close to saturation. We have conducted three experiments: the stability of pure liquid water around the vicinity of the triple point is studied in experiment 1, as well as observing the interchange of water between the atmosphere and the salts when the surface is saturated; in experiment 2, the salts were mixed with Mojave Martian Simulant (MMS) to observe changes in the texture of the regolith caused by the interaction with hydrates and liquid brines, and to quantify the potential of the Martian regolith to absorb and retain water; and experiment 3 investigates the evaporation of pure liquid water away from the triple point temperature when both the air and ground are at the same temperature and the relative humidity is near saturation. We show experimentally that frost can form spontaneously on a surface when saturation is reached and that, when the temperature is above 273.15 K (0 °C), this frost can transform into liquid water, which can persist for up to 3.5 to 4.5 h at Martian surface conditions. For comparison, we study the behavior of certain deliquescent salts that exist on the Martian surface, which can increase their mass between 32% and 85% by absorption of atmospheric water within a few hours. A mixture of these salts in a 10% concentration with simulant produces an aggregated granular structure with a water gain of approximately 18- to 50-wt%. Up to 53% of the atmospheric water was captured by the simulated ground, as pure liquid water, hydrate, or brine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
Mars, pure liquid water, water cycle simulation, habitability, planetary protection, ISRU
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-87851 (URN)10.3390/s21217421 (DOI)000718981700001 ()34770727 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85118511551 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kempe Foundations, SMK-1934Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0346
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-11-10 (johcin);

Funder: Spanish State Research Agency (AEI) (MDM-2017-0737), Unidad de Excelencia “María de Maeztu”- Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (PID2019-104205GB-C21)

Available from: 2021-11-10 Created: 2021-11-10 Last updated: 2022-02-10Bibliographically approved
Israel Nazarious, M., Vakkada Ramachandran, A., Zorzano, M.-P. & Martin-Torres, J. (2021). Measuring Electrical Conductivity to Study the Formation of Brines Under Martian Conditions. Journal of Visualized Experiments, 173, Article ID e61217.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring Electrical Conductivity to Study the Formation of Brines Under Martian Conditions
2021 (English)In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, E-ISSN 1940-087X, Vol. 173, article id e61217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes a protocol to design experiments to study the formation of brines under Martian conditions and monitor the process with electrical conductivity measurements. We used the Engineering Qualification Model (EQM) of Habitability: Brines, Irradiation, and Temperature (HABIT)/ExoMars 2022 instrument for the experiment setup but we provide a brief account of constructing a simple and inexpensive electrical conductivity measurement setup. The protocol serves to calibrate the electrical conductivity measurements of the salt deliquescence into brine in a simulated Martian environment. The Martian conditions of temperature (-70 °C to 20 °C), relative humidity (0% to 100%) and pressure (7 - 8 mbar) with carbon-dioxide atmosphere were simulated in the SpaceQ Mars simulation chamber, a facility at the Luleå University of Technology, Sweden. The hydrate form of the known amount of salt accommodated between a pair of electrodes and thus the electrical conductivity measured depends predominantly on its water content and the temperature and relative humidity of the system. Electrical conductivity measurements were carried out at 1 Hz while exposing salts to a continuously increasing relative humidity (to force transitioning through various hydrates) at different Martian temperatures. For demonstration, a day-night cycle at Oxia Planum, Mars (the landing site of ExoMars 2022 mission) was recreated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JoVE, 2021
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-86872 (URN)10.3791/61217 (DOI)000682796200008 ()34398148 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85118502425 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish National Space BoardThe Kempe FoundationsWallenberg Foundations
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-09-01 (alebob);

Forskningsfinansiär: Spanish State Research Agency (AEI) (MDM-2017-0737); Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (PID2019-104205GB-C21)

Available from: 2021-08-27 Created: 2021-08-27 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Mathanlal, T., Vakkada Ramachandran, A., Zorzano, M.-P. & Martin-Torres, J. (2021). PACKMAN – A portable instrument to investigate space weather. HardwareX, 9, Article ID e00169.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PACKMAN – A portable instrument to investigate space weather
2021 (English)In: HardwareX, E-ISSN 2468-0672, Vol. 9, article id e00169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PACKMAN (PArticle Counter k-index Magnetic ANomaly) is an autonomous, light and robust space weather instrument for operation within the subsurface, surface and atmosphere (as payload in stratospheric balloons) of the Earth. It has been designed using Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components to reduce the cost of each unit and to allow to have multiple units monitoring simultaneously at different sites and also incorporate an open-access citizen science approach. The hardware-core of each PACKMAN units, weights around 600 g and consumes about 500 mA of current at 12 V. PACKMAN has been deployed at multiple latitudes and altitudes ranging from stratospheric heights (corroborating its TRL8 maturity) to subsurface depths of around 1 km. The data from PACKMAN have been compared with the state-of-the-art ground-based observatories, and satellites and scientific observations have been documented. A 3-D network of PACKMAN units operating continuously around the globe, from the subsurface to the stratosphere, would help to improve the understanding of the space weather phenomena, and its implications on the climate and infrastructures. PACKMAN is also an excellent tool for education and outreach. This article outlines the building instructions of two types of PACKMAN units: PACKMAN-S for ground-based measurements and PACKMAN-B for stratospheric measurements aboard high-altitude balloons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
space weather, radiation, COTS, open-source, magnetic anomaly, Earth observation
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-82247 (URN)10.1016/j.ohx.2020.e00169 (DOI)000657359300010 ()35492038 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85099504477 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 1;2021-02-01 (johcin);

Finansiär: Spanish State Research Agency (AEI) (MDM-2017-0737), Unidad de Excelencia “María de Maeztu”- Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (PID2019-104205GB-C21)

Available from: 2021-01-11 Created: 2021-01-11 Last updated: 2022-05-09Bibliographically approved
Mathanlal, T., Bhardwaj, A., Vakkada Ramachandran, A., Zorzano Mier, M.-P., Martín-Torres, J. & Cockell, C. S. (2021). Subsurface robotic exploration for geomorphology, astrobiology and mining during MINAR6 campaign, Boulby Mine, UK: part II (Results and Discussion). International Journal of Astrobiology, 20(1), 93-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subsurface robotic exploration for geomorphology, astrobiology and mining during MINAR6 campaign, Boulby Mine, UK: part II (Results and Discussion)
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2021 (English)In: International Journal of Astrobiology, ISSN 1473-5504, E-ISSN 1475-3006, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 93-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Geomorphological studies of the hidden and protected subsurface environments are crucial to obtain a greater insight into the evolution of planetary landforms, hydrology, climate, geology and mineralogy. From an astrobiological point of view subsurface environments are of interest for their potential habitability as they are local environments that are partially or fully shielded from the high levels of space and solar radiation. Furthermore, in the case of Mars, there is an increasing interest in searching for the presence of past or extant life in its subsurface. These applications make it mandatory to investigate equipment and instrumentation that allow for the study of subsurface geomorphology, as well as organic chemical biomarkers, such as biomolecules, carbon, nitrogen and sulphur isotopes, and other biologically significant minerals and gases. Mines on Earth can be used as analogues to investigate the geomorphology of Martian subsurface environments and perform astrobiology studies. With that goal, we have developed a low-cost, robust, remotely operable subsurface rover called KORE (KOmpact Rover for Exploration). This work illustrates the studies of a terrestrial analogue for the exploration of Mars using KORE during the Mine Analogue Research 6 (MINAR 6) campaign with the low-cost 3D mapping technology InXSpace 3D (In situ 3D mapping tool eXploration of space 3D). InXSpace 3D utilizes an RGB-D camera that captures depth information in addition to the RGB data of an image, operating based on the structured light principle capable of providing depth information in mm scale resolution at sub 3 m mapping range. InXSpace 3D is used to capture point clouds of natural and artificial features, thereby obtaining information about geologically relevant structures and also to incorporate them in earth mining safety. We tested two of the dense simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) algorithms: Kintinuous and Real-Time Appearance-Based Mapping (RTAB-Map) to check the performance of InXSpace 3D in a dark mine environment. Also, the air accumulation of volatiles such as methane and formaldehyde due to thermogenic and mining process was measured with the environmental station payload on the rover platform, which caters to both astrobiological significance and mine safety. The main conclusions of this work are: (1) a comparison made between the RTAB-Map algorithm and Kintinuous algorithm showed the superiority of Kintinuous algorithm in providing better 3D reconstruction; although RTAB-Map algorithm captured more points than the Kintinuous algorithm in the dark mine environment; (2) a comparison of point cloud images captured with and without lighting conditions had a negligible effect on the surface density of the point clouds; (3) close-range imaging of the polygonal features occurring on the halite walls using InXSpace 3D provided mm-scale resolution to enable further characterization; (4) heuristic algorithms to quickly post-process the 3D point cloud data provided encouraging results for preliminary analyses; (5) we successfully demonstrated the application of KORE to mine safety; and (6) the multi-sensors platform on KORE successfully monitored the accumulated volatiles in the mine atmosphere during its operation. The findings obtained during this KORE campaign could be incorporated in designing and planning future subsurface rover explorations to potential planetary bodies such as Mars with synergistic applications to subsurface environments in mines on Earth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2021
Keywords
astrobiology, COTS, geomorphology, mining, rover development, 3D-mapping
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-82499 (URN)10.1017/S1473550420000385 (DOI)000607395700008 ()2-s2.0-85098970483 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kempe Foundations
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-01-19 (alebob);

Finansiär: Spanish State Research Agency (AEI) (MDM-2017-0737)

Available from: 2021-01-19 Created: 2021-01-19 Last updated: 2021-02-04Bibliographically approved
Bhardwaj, A., Sam, L. & Martin-Torres, J. (2021). The challenges and possibilities of earthquake predictions using non-seismic precursors. The European Physical Journal Special Topics, 230(1), 367-380
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The challenges and possibilities of earthquake predictions using non-seismic precursors
2021 (English)In: The European Physical Journal Special Topics, ISSN 1951-6355, E-ISSN 1951-6401, Vol. 230, no 1, p. 367-380Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The catastrophic magnitude of life and monetary losses associated with earthquakes deserve serious attention and mitigation measures. However, in addition to the pre-earthquake and post-earthquake alleviation actions, the scientific community indeed needs to reconsider the possibilities of earthquake predictions using non-seismic precursors. A significant number of studies in the recent decades have reported several possible earthquake precursors such as anomalies in electric field, magnetic field, gas/aerosol emissions, ionospheric signals, ground water level, land surface temperature, surface deformations, animal behaviour, thermal infrared signals, atmospheric gravity waves, and lightning. Such substantial number of scientific articles and reported anomalous signals cannot be overlooked without a thoughtful appraisal. Here, we provide an opinion on the way forward for earthquake prediction in terms of challenges and possibilities while using non-seismic precursors. A general point of concern is the widely varying arrival times and the amplitudes of the anomalies, putting a question mark on their universal applicability as earthquake markers. However, a unifying concept which does not only define the physical basis of either all or most of these anomalies but which also streamlines their characterisation procedure must be the focus of future earthquake precursory research. Advancements in developing the adaptable instrumentation for in-situ observations of the claimed non-seismic precursors must be the next step and the satellite observations should not be taken as a replacement for field-based research. We support the need to standardise the precursor detection techniques and to employ a global-scale monitoring system for making any possible earthquake predictions reliable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Earthquake predictions, non-seismic precursors
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73809 (URN)10.1140/epjst/e2020-000257-3 (DOI)000609483400018 ()2-s2.0-85099564857 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-02-11 (alebob)

Available from: 2019-05-02 Created: 2019-05-02 Last updated: 2021-02-11Bibliographically approved
Konatham, S., Martin-Torres, J. & Zorzano, M.-P. (2021). The Impact of the Spectral Radiation Environment on the Maximum Absorption Wavelengths of Human Vision and Other Species. Life, 11(12), Article ID 1337.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of the Spectral Radiation Environment on the Maximum Absorption Wavelengths of Human Vision and Other Species
2021 (English)In: Life, E-ISSN 2075-1729, Vol. 11, no 12, article id 1337Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since the earliest development of the eye (and vision) around 530 million years ago (Mya), it has evolved, adapting to different habitats, species, and changing environmental conditions on Earth. We argue that a radiation environment determined by the atmosphere played a determining role in the evolution of vision, specifically on the human eye, which has three vision regimes (photopic-, scotopic-, and mesopic vision) for different illumination conditions. An analysis of the irradiance spectra, reaching the shallow ocean depths, revealed that the available radiation could have determined the bandwidth of the precursor to vision systems, including human vision. We used the radiative transfer model to test the existing hypotheses on human vision. We argue that, once on the surface, the human photopic (daytime) and scotopic (night-time) vision followed different evolutionary directions, maximum total energy, and optimum information, respectively. Our analysis also suggests that solar radiation reflected from the moon had little or no influence on the evolution of scotopic vision. Our results indicate that, apart from human vision, the vision of only a few birds, rodents, and deep-sea fish are strongly correlated to the available radiation within their respective habitats.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
human vision, atmosphere, photopic vision, scotopic vision, evolution, astrobiology
National Category
Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences Zoology
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-88887 (URN)10.3390/life11121337 (DOI)000737669500001 ()34947867 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122412354 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-01-24 (johcin);

Funder: The County Administrative Board of Norrbotten

Available from: 2022-01-24 Created: 2022-01-24 Last updated: 2022-09-28Bibliographically approved
Wang, J., Fonseca, R., Rutledge, K., Martin-Torres, J. & Yu, J. (2020). A Hybrid Statistical-Dynamical Downscaling of Air Temperature over Scandinavia Using the WRF Model. Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, 37(1), 57-74
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Hybrid Statistical-Dynamical Downscaling of Air Temperature over Scandinavia Using the WRF Model
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2020 (English)In: Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, ISSN 0256-1530, E-ISSN 1861-9533, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 57-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An accurate simulation of air temperature at local scales is crucial for the vast majority of weather and climate applications. In this work, a hybrid statistical–dynamical downscaling method and a high-resolution dynamical-only downscaling method are applied to daily mean, minimum and maximum air temperatures to investigate the quality of localscale estimates produced by downscaling. These two downscaling approaches are evaluated using station observation data obtained from the Finnish Meteorological Institute over a near-coastal region of western Finland. The dynamical downscaling is performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and the statistical downscaling method implemented is the Cumulative Distribution Function-transform (CDF-t). The CDF-t is trained using 20 years of WRF-downscaled Climate Forecast System Reanalysis data over the region at a 3-km spatial resolution for the central month of each season. The performance of the two methods is assessed qualitatively, by inspection of quantile-quantile plots, and quantitatively, through the Cramer-von Mises, mean absolute error, and root-mean-square error diagnostics. The hybrid approach is found to provide significantly more skillful forecasts of the observed daily mean and maximum air temperatures than those of the dynamical-only downscaling (for all seasons). The hybrid method proves to be less computationally expensive, and also to give more skillful temperature forecasts (at least for the Finnish near-coastal region).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
WRF, air temperature, Cumulative Distribution Function-transform, hybrid statistical–dynamical downscaling, model evaluation, Scandinavian Peninsula
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75693 (URN)10.1007/s00376-019-9091-0 (DOI)000518185100005 ()2-s2.0-85076346059 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-03-13 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-08-26 Created: 2019-08-26 Last updated: 2020-04-01Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6479-2236

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