Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 80) Show all publications
Malmström, M., Wesemann, H. & Wincent, J. (2020). How Women Can Improve Their Venture Pitch Outcomes. MIT Sloan Management Review, 61(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Women Can Improve Their Venture Pitch Outcomes
2020 (English)In: MIT Sloan Management Review, ISSN 1532-9194, E-ISSN 1532-8937, Vol. 61, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Successful entrepreneurs are aware of potentially biased responses to their pitches and take control of the conversation.

Keywords
Corporate Culture, Diversity, Human Behavior, Leadership, Organizational Biases, Venture Capital
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78816 (URN)
Available from: 2020-05-07 Created: 2020-05-07 Last updated: 2020-06-03
Shepherd, D. A., Johansson, J., Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2020). Rallying the Troops and Defending against Sanctions: A Government Body Breaking Decision‐Making Rules to Fund Entrepreneurial Ventures. Journal of Management Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rallying the Troops and Defending against Sanctions: A Government Body Breaking Decision‐Making Rules to Fund Entrepreneurial Ventures
2020 (English)In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Critical to top management’s organizing efforts are the formal rules for how organizational members are to make decisions. However, employees can break top management’s decision‐making rules. Although scholars have investigated rule breaking at the individual and group levels of analysis, research is needed into how members come together as a group to break an organization’s decision‐making rules, and how groups’ rule breaking persists. To address this important research gap, we draw from a real‐time qualitative investigation of both the breaking and following of decision‐making rules to develop a group model that: (1) explains how an individual can trigger his or her group to break decision‐making rules to generate perceived benefits for the group and/or others external to the organization, (2) provides insights into the mechanisms by which rule breaking persists, and (3) highlights the norms of developing and perpetuating groups’ breaking decision‐making rules.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
Decision making, Entrepreneurial funding, Government, Groups, Rule breaking
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-77779 (URN)10.1111/joms.12562 (DOI)000516980400001 ()2-s2.0-85081038069 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-19 Created: 2020-02-19 Last updated: 2020-04-01
Malmström, M., Voitkane, A., Johansson, J. & Wincent, J. (2020). What do they think and what do they say?: Gender bias, entrepreneurial attitude in writing and venture capitalists’ funding decisions. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 13, Article ID e00154.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What do they think and what do they say?: Gender bias, entrepreneurial attitude in writing and venture capitalists’ funding decisions
2020 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 13, article id e00154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study shows that women may be at a disadvantage when signaling that they are “entrepreneurial” to venture capitalists. We demonstrate how gender-based disadvantages may arise from role incongruence in entrepreneurship by analyzing multi-source data from 131 venture capital applications, venture capitalists’ cognitions, and their funding decisions. Our analysis indicates that women who signal an entrepreneurial attitude are more likely to elicit prevention considerations from venture capitalists, whereas men who signal such an attitude are more likely to elicit promotion considerations. We also find that promotion considerations increase the amount of financing, whereas prevention considerations decrease the amount of financing. Our study increases knowledge about the gendered cognitions that underlie implicit bias among investors and knowledge about the effects of regulatory focus on funding outcomes by exploring the interaction between gender and entrepreneurial attitude.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Gender, Venture capital, Role congruity theory, Entrepreneurship, Stereotypes
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78817 (URN)10.1016/j.jbvi.2019.e00154 (DOI)2-s2.0-85077471728 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 1;2020-05-11 (alebob)

Available from: 2020-05-07 Created: 2020-05-07 Last updated: 2020-05-11Bibliographically approved
Johansson, J., Malmström, M., Wincent, J. & Parida, V. (2019). How individual cognitions overshadow regulations and group norms: a study of government venture capital decisions. Small Business Economics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How individual cognitions overshadow regulations and group norms: a study of government venture capital decisions
2019 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This paper explores how government venture capitalists approve or reject financing applications. Based on longitudinal observations, complemented by interviews, documentation, and secondary data, the findings show the limited influence of the regulative and normative logics (e.g., formal guidelines and accepted behavior) on government venture capitalists’ decisions. Instead, individual decisions are observed to be largely overshadowed by cognitions and heuristics, which dominate formal regulations and socially constructed group-level norms. Although official decision communications state that regulations have been followed, the evidence suggests that the cognitive logic dominates the funding decision-making process through a set of overshadowing forces that restrict the influence of the normative and regulative logics on funding decisions. This research has implications for venture financing and highlights the importance of cognitions in shaping venture capital decisions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Government investment, Venture financing, Venture capital, Entrepreneurship, Institutional theory, Decision making
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76815 (URN)10.1007/s11187-019-00273-3 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-11-22 Created: 2019-11-22 Last updated: 2020-05-11
Voitkane, A., Johansson, J., Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2019). How much does the “same-gender effect” matter in VCs' assessments of entrepreneurs?. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 12, Article ID e00133.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How much does the “same-gender effect” matter in VCs' assessments of entrepreneurs?
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 12, article id e00133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our study uses cognitive mapping techniques to take into account how the same/opposite gender influences the cognitive evaluations of venture capitalists (VCs). Contrary to what has often been discussed in previous entrepreneurship literature, our results report women VCs evaluate women entrepreneurs more critically, and men VCs evaluate men entrepreneurs more critically. However, overall, the VCs' vaguer processing and lower rating of women's venturing compared to men's indicate a general structure of subordinating women's venturing compared to men's venturing. Ultimately, this contributes with an alternative view to explain what we see on the VC scene: women entrepreneurs are more likely to be rejected. We discuss implications of these results as well as implications for future study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75262 (URN)10.1016/j.jbvi.2019.e00133 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067863472 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 1;2019-07-09 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2020-01-24Bibliographically approved
Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2018). Bank lending and financial discrimination from the formal economy: How women entrepreneurs get forced into involuntary bootstrapping. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 10, Article ID e00096.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bank lending and financial discrimination from the formal economy: How women entrepreneurs get forced into involuntary bootstrapping
2018 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 10, article id e00096Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of banks, their decision models, and their linkages with how entrepreneurs can act as providers to the formal economy have not been focused on much in entrepreneurship research. We explore the trend of transaction-based lending among banks on entrepreneurs’ engagement in informal economic activities (or involuntary bootstrapping activities) and how that relationship is moderated by gender. The results show that women entrepreneurs who encounter banks with transaction-based lending are forced to engage in much more informal economic activities compared to men, while this gender bias vanishes when entrepreneurs face banks with relation-based lending. We associate these results with gender stereotyping and suggest transaction-based lending to be costly for the development of formal economies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70258 (URN)10.1016/j.jbvi.2018.e00096 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050685555 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 1;2018-08-07 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2018-08-15Bibliographically approved
Voitkane, A., Johansson, J., Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2018). Does birds of a feather flock together?: A relational gender theory approach in entrepreneurial finance. In: 21st Uddevalla Symposium, 2018: . Paper presented at 21st Uddevalla Symposium, Luleå, Sweden, 14-16 June 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does birds of a feather flock together?: A relational gender theory approach in entrepreneurial finance
2018 (English)In: 21st Uddevalla Symposium, 2018, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70612 (URN)
Conference
21st Uddevalla Symposium, Luleå, Sweden, 14-16 June 2018
Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2020-01-24Bibliographically approved
Malmström, M. & Öqvist, A. (2018). Students' attitudes and intentions toward higher education as determinants for grade performance (ed.). International Journal of School & Educational Psychology, 6(1), 23-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' attitudes and intentions toward higher education as determinants for grade performance
2018 (English)In: International Journal of School & Educational Psychology, ISSN 2168-3603, E-ISSN 2168-3611, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 23-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little empirical evidence is available on what drives young people to engage in higher education. Such knowledge is crucial in order to motivate students to make the most of their potential. This study surveyed a total of 294 Swedish high school students. The result shows that intentions play a mediating role between students' attitudes and the performance levels they achieve. Our results contribute to existing literature by showing that attitudes link to young people's intentions, and intentions subsequently associate with performance behavior. The findings provide guidance on how to foster students' grade performance in school.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Pedagogy
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation; Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11647 (URN)10.1080/21683603.2016.1254132 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050740376 (Scopus ID)aa9a8a33-6dc2-4d45-8349-3583412a40ef (Local ID)aa9a8a33-6dc2-4d45-8349-3583412a40ef (Archive number)aa9a8a33-6dc2-4d45-8349-3583412a40ef (OAI)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 1;2018-02-28 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2018). The Digitization of Banks Disproportionately Hurts Women Entrepreneurs. Harvard Business Review, sep
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Digitization of Banks Disproportionately Hurts Women Entrepreneurs
2018 (English)In: Harvard Business Review, ISSN 0017-8012, Vol. sepArticle in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Harvard University, 2018
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71209 (URN)
Available from: 2018-10-15 Created: 2018-10-15 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Öqvist, A. & Malmström, M. (2018). What motivates students?: A study on effects of teacher leadership and students' self-efficacy. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 21(2), 155-175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What motivates students?: A study on effects of teacher leadership and students' self-efficacy
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Leadership in Education, ISSN 1360-3124, E-ISSN 1464-5092, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 155-175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Students’ educational motivation is significant for performance and achieving learning, but little is known about what fuels such motivation. Educational motivation is regarded as the drive and inner state that energise educational activities, facilitate learning and channel behaviour towards achieving educational goals. Educational motivation paves the way for students to learn and acquire the knowledge that is essential for successful study outcomes. This article aims to explore what determines students’ educational motivation. Building on the self-determination theory, we modelled the influence of teachers’ leadership and students’ self-efficacy on students’ educational motivation. We used survey data from a sample of upper secondary school students in Sweden; we received a total of 993 answers, equal to a response rate of 74%. The results show that students’ self-efficacy and teacher leadership are of extreme importance for students’ educational motivation, and that highly efficacious students lose most educational motivation when the teacher’s leadership is poor. The results thus support the importance of teachers’ leadership for encouraging student learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Social Sciences Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Pedagogy
Research subject
Education; Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-64849 (URN)10.1080/13603124.2017.1355480 (DOI)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-01-25 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-07-10 Created: 2017-07-10 Last updated: 2018-01-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0290-7522

Search in DiVA

Show all publications