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Publications (10 of 69) Show all publications
Harring, N., Jönsson, E., Matti, S., Mundaca, G. & Jagers, S. C. (2023). Cross-national analysis of attitudes towards fossil fuel subsidy removal. Nature Climate Change, 13, 244-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-national analysis of attitudes towards fossil fuel subsidy removal
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2023 (English)In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 13, p. 244-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2021, governments of 51 countries spent US$697 billion on subsidizing fossil fuels. Removing fossil fuel subsidies is crucial not only for reducing CO2 emissions and making carbon pricing more effective, but also for making more valuable use of government funds. Currently, however, scientific evidence on the scale and scope of public attitudes towards fossil fuel subsidy-removal policies is lacking, yet it is instrumental for gauging political feasibility. Furthermore, previous studies tend to focus on carbon pricing in the developed world only. Here we present a comparative analysis of attitudes towards both carbon taxation and fossil fuel subsidy removal, focusing on five developing countries across four continents. It is found that (1) removing fossil fuel subsidies is not more undesirable than introducing carbon taxation and (2) the public has more-positive attitudes towards subsidy removal if optimal use of the saved fiscal revenues is specified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Economics and Business
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-95804 (URN)10.1038/s41558-023-01597-5 (DOI)000937672500002 ()2-s2.0-85148571559 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Research CouncilSwedish Energy Agency
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-04-18 (joosat);

Licens fulltext: CC BY License

Available from: 2023-03-07 Created: 2023-03-07 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Harring, N., Jönsson, E., Matti, S., Mundaca, G. & Jagers, S. C. (2023). Public acceptance of fossil fuel subsidy removal can be reinforced with revenue recycling. Nature Climate Change, 13, 214-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public acceptance of fossil fuel subsidy removal can be reinforced with revenue recycling
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2023 (English)In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 13, p. 214-215Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Removing fossil fuel subsidies is important for mitigation and making carbon pricing polices effective. We find that removing subsidies on fossil fuels may not generate more public resistance (or support) than introducing a carbon tax, and by specifying alternatives for revenue recycling, the level of acceptability may increase.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-96225 (URN)10.1038/s41558-023-01609-4 (DOI)000937672500004 ()2-s2.0-85149693107 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019-00916, 2019-02005Swedish Research Council, 2016-03058Swedish Energy Agency, 2019-006655
Note

Godkänd;2023;Nivå 0;2023-07-20 (sofila);

This article is asssociated with: Harring, N., Jönsson, E., Matti, S. et al. Cross-national analysis of attitudes towards fossil fuel subsidy removal. Nat. Clim. Chang. 13, 244–249 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-023-01597-5

Available from: 2023-03-23 Created: 2023-03-23 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Matti, S., Nässén, J. & Larsson, J. (2022). Are fee-and-dividend schemes the savior of environmental taxation? Analyses of how different revenue use alternatives affect public support for Sweden’s air passenger tax. Environmental Science and Policy, 132, 181-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are fee-and-dividend schemes the savior of environmental taxation? Analyses of how different revenue use alternatives affect public support for Sweden’s air passenger tax
2022 (English)In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 132, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article studies if, how, and why different revenue uses affect public attitudes to environmental taxation. More specifically, using a large-scale (N = 4292) randomized survey experiment with a 2 × 3 factorial design, the article analyses how attitudes towards a proposed increase in the current air passenger tax in Sweden are altered when combining a tax increase with three different suggestions for revenue use. The increasingly popular fee-and-dividend solution, where revenues are distributed back to the public, thus decreasing negative distributive tax effects, is compared with two additional revenue uses: unspecified government spending on welfare services, and re-investment of revenues into aviation biofuels. Our results show that, although some of the commonly used independent variables such as climate concern, personal norms and political-ideological orientation are significant in determining policy attitudes, varying both tax level and revenue use also tangibly affects how a policy proposal is received. Interestingly, however, the fee-and-dividend approach does not yield the most positive policy attitudes. Rather, directing the revenues to fund an increased use of biofuels for aviation is the alternative that most clearly drives positive attitudes to this policy, and is also the alternative that is perceived as the most effective and fair in both the high tax and the low tax alternatives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Fee-and-dividend, Tax, Aviation, Policy, Climate change
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-89999 (URN)10.1016/j.envsci.2022.02.024 (DOI)000787245600008 ()2-s2.0-85125670047 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2016-01743
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-03-31 (johcin);

Funder:Stiftelsen för Miljöstrategisk Forskning (2016/3)

Available from: 2022-03-31 Created: 2022-03-31 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Steg, L., Perlaviciute, G., Sovacool, B. K., Bonaiuto, M., Diekmann, A., Filippini, M., . . . Woerdman, E. (2021). A Research Agenda to Better Understand the Human Dimensions of Energy Transitions. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, Article ID 672776.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Research Agenda to Better Understand the Human Dimensions of Energy Transitions
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2021 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 672776Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) have a key role to play in understanding which factors and policies would motivate, encourage and enable different actors to adopt a wide range of sustainable energy behaviours and support the required system changes and policies. The SSH can provide critical insights into how consumers could be empowered to consistently engage in sustainable energy behaviour, support and adopt new technologies, and support policies and changes in energy systems. Furthermore, they can increase our understanding of how organisations such as private and public institutions, and groups and associations of people can play a key role in the sustainable energy transition. We identify key questions to be addressed that have been identified by the Platform for Energy Research in the Socio-economic Nexus (PERSON, see person.eu), including SSH scholars who have been studying energy issues for many years. We identify three main research themes. The first research theme involves understanding which factors encourage different actors to engage in sustainable energy behaviour. The second research theme focuses on understanding which interventions can be effective in encouraging sustainable energy behaviour of different actors, and which factors enhance their effects. The third research theme concerns understanding which factors affect public and policy support for energy policy and changes in energy systems, and how important public concerns can best be addressed as to reduce or prevent resistance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2021
Keywords
energy transition, sustainable energy behaviour, social sciences, humanities, research agenda, behaviour change, public support
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-86480 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2021.672776 (DOI)000671092600001 ()34248769 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85109775952 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-07-28 (beamah);

Forskningsfinansiär: Green Deal project Public acceptability of energy concepts (UI60071)

Available from: 2021-07-28 Created: 2021-07-28 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Jagers, S. C., Lachapelle, E., Martinsson, J. & Matti, S. (2021). Bridging the ideological gap? How fairness perceptions mediate the effect of revenue recycling on public support for carbon taxes in the United States, Canada and Germany. Review of Policy Research, 38(5), 529-554
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridging the ideological gap? How fairness perceptions mediate the effect of revenue recycling on public support for carbon taxes in the United States, Canada and Germany
2021 (English)In: Review of Policy Research, ISSN 1541-132X, E-ISSN 1541-1338, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 529-554Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbon taxes are frequently advocated as a means of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, yet their political feasibility remains a challenge. To enhance their political appeal, carbon tax proponents have proposed revenue recycling as a means of alleviating public concern with this instrument's visible costs. Analyzing data from identical survey-experiments administered in the United States, Canada, and Germany, we examine the extent to which returning revenues to the public has the potential to broaden the political acceptability of carbon taxes across ideological and national contexts. While public opinion is sensitive to the cost attributes of carbon taxes, we find that in some cases, opposition to carbon taxes can be offset by a reduction in income taxes. However, these effects tend to be modest in size, limited to some ideological groups, and varied across countries. Moreover, we demonstrate that fairness perceptions are a crucial mechanism linking revenue recycling to carbon tax support in all countries examined. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
carbon tax, fairness, ideology, public opinion, revenue recycling, survey experiment
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-86856 (URN)10.1111/ropr.12439 (DOI)000685523000001 ()2-s2.0-85112684468 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-09-13 (beamah)

Available from: 2021-08-26 Created: 2021-08-26 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Nash, S. L., Torney, D. & Matti, S. (2021). Climate Change Acts: Origins, Dynamics, and Consequences. Climate Policy, 21(9), 1111-1119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate Change Acts: Origins, Dynamics, and Consequences
2021 (English)In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1111-1119Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Framework legislation on climate change is coming of age. Ever more nation states and sub-state entities are passing Climate Change Acts (CCAs) – framework legislation that lays down general principles and obligations for climate change policymaking – and a number of early adopters are updating or replacing their initial legislation. This provides an opportune moment to bring together and move forward the scholarship on CCAs, examining where they have come from (their origins), how they work in practice (their dynamics), and what impacts they are having on the world and how it is organized (their consequences). The contributions to this Special Issue analyse the CCAs of Sweden, Mexico, New Zealand, Australian subnational governments, the UK, Denmark, Scotland and Austria as well as an unsuccessful attempt to introduce a Belgian CCA. Collectively, they add a wealth of new perspectives to the growing scholarship, identifying policy insights that can inspire further scholarship and future policy endeavours that can learn from these cases. The Special Issue contributions demonstrate that a number of contextual factors and elements of parliamentary process are important for successful passing of CCAs and/or high levels of ambition in the legislation itself. They highlight both the dangers and potential of policy fragmentation as dynamics of CCAs and the potential role for advisory bodies to shape these dynamics. Finally, consequences are identified in changes in political culture, parliamentary debate and the emergence of specific policies. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Climate Change Acts, framework legislation, origins, dynamics, consequences
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-88048 (URN)10.1080/14693062.2021.1996536 (DOI)000714239600001 ()2-s2.0-85118788746 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00702
Note

Funder: Austrian Climate Research Programme (ACRP9) CCA, (KR16AC0K13333)

Available from: 2021-11-29 Created: 2021-11-29 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Poelzer, G., Linde, S., Jagers, S. C. & Matti, S. (2021). Digging in the dark: reviewing international literature to address impending policy challenges for Swedish and Finnish mining. Mineral Economics, 34(2), 225-238
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digging in the dark: reviewing international literature to address impending policy challenges for Swedish and Finnish mining
2021 (English)In: Mineral Economics, ISSN 2191-2203, E-ISSN 2191-2211, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 225-238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mining industries of Sweden and Finland currently face several policy issues around investment, stakeholder involvement, and sustainability. Since the two countries garnered significant attention during the mining boom, research from a social sciences perspective grew significantly. One approach to understanding how these issues in Sweden and Finland compare to international examples is through an analysis of the policy development framework. Looking at three factors—institutions, actors, and process—gives a broad overview of the imminent challenges in both Sweden and Finland and potential lessons from existing research that point to similar problems and their solutions. As the mining operations continue to sit at the center of different values, capable policy is required.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Mining policy, Policy process, Institutions
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-83493 (URN)10.1007/s13563-021-00255-6 (DOI)000625513800001 ()2-s2.0-85102204411 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-06-18 (beamah)

Available from: 2021-04-06 Created: 2021-04-06 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Matti, S., Petersson, C. & Söderberg, C. (2021). The Swedish climate policy framework as a means for climate policy integration: an assessment. Climate Policy, 21(9), 1146-1158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish climate policy framework as a means for climate policy integration: an assessment
2021 (English)In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1146-1158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Has the Swedish Climate Policy Framework – including the new Swedish Climate Act – adopted in June 2017, been conducive to advancing climate mitigation, and if so, to what extent and in which aspects? Although Sweden is often described as a frontrunner in climate work, several evaluations prior to the adoption of the Climate Policy Framework and the Climate Act concluded that Swedish climate policy has suffered from both implementation and monitoring deficits, as well as from the fact that climate goals and strategies were non-legally binding. Taken together, such deficits make the stable, long-term prioritizing of climate mitigation over other sector policies increasingly difficult, thus limiting the possibilities to reach future targets. This article focuses on three dimensions of climate policy integration – assessing policy processes, outputs and outcomes – with the aim to analyse political developments and policy outcomes in Sweden after the implementation of the Climate Policy Framework and the Climate Act. The results of a comprehensive set of interviews with policy experts and high-level decision-makers show that the framework is believed to have had important effects, mainly in terms of changing both policy language, cross-sector coordination, and increasing the prioritization of the climate issue. Thus the study (1) contributes to a better theoretical and empirical understanding of Climate Change Acts as instruments for climate policy integration; (2) paves the way for future comparative studies; and (3) presents important practical lessons for policy makers on the effects of legal mechanisms to achieve climate mitigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Climate acts, climate policy integration, Swedish climate policy, environmental policy integration
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-86302 (URN)10.1080/14693062.2021.1930510 (DOI)000669825800001 ()2-s2.0-85109731847 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00702
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-11-08 (beamah)

Available from: 2021-07-07 Created: 2021-07-07 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Povitkina, M., Carlsson Jagers, S., Matti, S. & Martinsson, J. (2021). Why are carbon taxes unfair? Disentangling public perceptions of fairness. Global Environmental Change, 70, Article ID 102356.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why are carbon taxes unfair? Disentangling public perceptions of fairness
2021 (English)In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 70, article id 102356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to reach climate goals, governments need to gain support from their voters for the necessary policy interventions, such as carbon dioxide taxes. Previous research concludes that people often do not support and legitimize such taxes because they perceive them as unfair. However, the notion of fairness implies a multitude of factors and despite attempts of the previous research to further nuance people’s fairness perceptions, we currently lack a more precise understanding of what people mean when they regard carbon taxes as unfair. In this article, we thoroughly investigate this problem by using original survey data from YouGov collected in the United States in 2018 and analyzing open-ended survey responses on why people think carbon taxes are unfair. Applying structural topic modeling, we unpack the multi-dimensional meaning of unfairness, as perceived by the US population. The results from our analysis show that people regard carbon taxes based on gas pricing as unfair because they perceive gas prices already being high, because of the need to drive, unfairness for the poor or rural population, lack of trust in government, or considerations that the purpose of the tax is unjustified. These findings help provide a more nuanced policy design to address fairness concerns related to carbon taxes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Carbon dioxide tax, Fairness, Justice, Public opinion
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-87025 (URN)10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2021.102356 (DOI)000704267800006 ()2-s2.0-85114162074 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-05973
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-09-09 (alebob);

Forskningsfinansiär: Collective Action Research and the Laboratory of Opinion Research at the University of Gothenburg

Available from: 2021-09-09 Created: 2021-09-09 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Harring, N., Jagers, S. C. & Matti, S. (2020). Higher education, norm development, and environmental protection. Higher Education, 79(2), 291-305
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Higher education, norm development, and environmental protection
2020 (English)In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 291-305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a debate on whether higher education in the social sciences generates stronger democratic and environmental norms among students. In our study, we focus on students’ perceptions about legitimate rule in the case of environmental protection. We contribute to this debate by using a unique longitudinal data set from seven universities and university colleges in Sweden. Our results show that higher education in the social sciences does not generate stronger democratic or environmental norms, at least not in the case of environmental protection. We discuss why this is the case and refine our results further by looking at individual-level factors, such as gender and ideology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Higher education, Sustainable development, Values, Norms, Policy support
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75655 (URN)10.1007/s10734-019-00410-7 (DOI)000511528300007 ()2-s2.0-85068186184 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-02-27 (alebob)

Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7646-1813

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