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Hjelte, J., Eliasson, B. & Berg, E. (2023). Changes in ideas on knowledge governance in the context of social services in Sweden. Nordic Social Work Research, 13(3), 431-444
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in ideas on knowledge governance in the context of social services in Sweden
2023 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 431-444Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Over the past 20 years, the Swedish government and national authorities have organized a structure for knowledge governance in order to implement an evidence-based practice (EBP) for social services. Since the idea of a knowledge governance has not been implemented as expected, it was considered important to develop regional collaboration and support structures (RCSSs) as a link between national and local authorities. In this article, we discuss changes in ideas on knowledge governance at the national level, and also changes in expectations on RCSSs function in knowledge governance of the Swedish social service. Changes in governance also change the prerequisites for implementation of EBP. Therefore, it is important to further examine and analyse ideas on knowledge governance at the national level and whether they change over time. The empirical data consists of official documents and interviews with representatives of key actors at national level. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews was then performed and also an analysis of the official document was used to describe the changes on knowledge governance. This article shows that ideas on knowledge governance has changed over time, from an emphasis on top-down governance towards a more dialogue-based governance. This shift in governance ideals also appears to have had an impact on expectations regarding RCSSs, through an increased emphasis on their collaborative function in relation to both national and local levels. The knowledge governance and the function of the RCSSs appear to be fragile, as this collaboration is based on voluntary partnership and networks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Knowledge governance, evidence-based practice, regional cooperation and support structures, changes in governance
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Human Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-89811 (URN)10.1080/2156857x.2021.2024242 (DOI)2-s2.0-85124141786 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-02113
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-11-08 (hanlid);

Full text license: CC BY-NC-ND

Available from: 2022-03-24 Created: 2022-03-24 Last updated: 2023-11-08Bibliographically approved
Chandler, J., Berg, E., Ellison, M. & Barry, J. (2017). Reconfiguring Professional Autonomy?: The case of social work in the UK. In: Bjorn Blom, Lars Evertsson, Marek Perlinski (Ed.), Björn Blom; Lars Evertsson; Marek Perlinski (Ed.), Social and Caring Professions in European Welfare States: Policies, Services and Professional Practices (pp. 69-82). Bristol: Policy Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconfiguring Professional Autonomy?: The case of social work in the UK
2017 (English)In: Social and Caring Professions in European Welfare States: Policies, Services and Professional Practices / [ed] Bjorn Blom, Lars Evertsson, Marek Perlinski, Bristol: Policy Press, 2017, p. 69-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Policy Press, 2017
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-21491 (URN)2-s2.0-85021144031 (Scopus ID)f47bdac7-fe62-4847-a8aa-847bfaf7d4fe (Local ID)9781447327196 (ISBN)f47bdac7-fe62-4847-a8aa-847bfaf7d4fe (Archive number)f47bdac7-fe62-4847-a8aa-847bfaf7d4fe (OAI)
Note

Upprättat; 2014; 20131127 (elbe)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Barry, J., Berg, E. & Chandler, J. (2016). The new management of healthcare: ‘Rational' performance and gendered actors (2ed.). In: Ellen Kuhlmann; Ellen Annandale (Ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Gender and Healthcare: (pp. 305-320). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The new management of healthcare: ‘Rational' performance and gendered actors
2016 (English)In: The Palgrave Handbook of Gender and Healthcare, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 2, p. 305-320Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In many countries across the world, and especially in Europe, we have seen an increasing concern with management as a key component of new governance and policy reforms in healthcare (Dent, 2003). In this chapter we focus on the new management of healthcare and the gendered actors who work to deliver the human services involved. By ʼnew’ management, we are referring to what has been called New Public Management (NPM), thought to have developed in many countries around the world from the 1970s onwards with the purpose of reducing costs, increasing efficiencies and accountabilities, and generally enhancing the quality of human services and experience of users (see Chandler et al., 2002; Dent et al., 2004; McLaughlin et al., 2002). Accordingly, our focus is on the management and implementation of healthcare, and of those involved in its delivery. In the middle of these processes are the new managers, often professionals, charged with responsibility for delivery. This is not to suggest that healthcare, like other human services within the public realm, has not been managed and organized in the past. It is rather to point to the growth of a new group or cadre of workers involved in the implementation of the new work regimes who draw on private sector management techniques and mindsets in their attempt to achieve the desired ends. We consider these changes with particular reference to gender (Barry et al., 2003).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016 Edition: 2
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62956 (URN)2-s2.0-85015898107 (Scopus ID)9780230290334 (ISBN)9780230230316 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2021-04-21Bibliographically approved
Chandler, J., Bell, L., Berg, E. & Barry, J. (2015). Social Work in Movement: Marketisation, Differentiation and Managerial Performativity in Sweden and England (ed.). International Journal of Social Work and Human Services Practice, 3(3), 109-117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Work in Movement: Marketisation, Differentiation and Managerial Performativity in Sweden and England
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Social Work and Human Services Practice, ISSN 2332-6832, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 109-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article considers the changing nature of social work in England and Sweden in the context of neoliberal reforms, and the consequences of the ongoing shifts to marketisation and differentiation, managerialism and performativity. Drawing on secondary sources and some interview data from English and Swedish social workers, the article argues that social workers in England and Sweden face similar shifts as marketisation, differentiation, managerialism and its related performativity reshape the occupation, all related to the influence of the macro-context of neoliberalism. ‘Evidence based practice' has become elevated as an important approach in line with increasing managerialism and performativity, affecting micro processes of everyday working life. Differences between the two countries lie largely in the timing of reforms and how social workers respond to them in organised ways – through mobilisation within the profession in England and through trades unions and local authorities in Sweden. The changes create uncertainty for social workers; while they are not merely passive victims of change they face difficult conditions in which to forge alternative models of professional practice. Contrary to what might have been expected, given the different social, political and historical legacies in Sweden and England of social democracy and liberalism respectively, comparing the social work occupation in these two countries finds many more similarities than differences in how marketisation, differentiation, managerialism and performativity impact on the occupation.

Keywords
Social Work, Sweden, England, Marketisation, Performativity, Managerialism, Identities
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6217 (URN)10.13189/ijrh.2015.030302 (DOI)469b101b-b018-4c23-8a16-d915cc2b26c3 (Local ID)469b101b-b018-4c23-8a16-d915cc2b26c3 (Archive number)469b101b-b018-4c23-8a16-d915cc2b26c3 (OAI)
Note

Godkänd; 2015; 20150730 (elbe)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2022-08-30Bibliographically approved
Berg, E., Barry, J. & Chandler, J. (2014). Gender and the managerial turn in higher education: Accounts from female academics in England and Sweden. In: Timo Aarrevaara; Elisabeth Berg (Ed.), Higher Education and Research in Nordic Countries: who should pay? (pp. 65-74). Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender and the managerial turn in higher education: Accounts from female academics in England and Sweden
2014 (English)In: Higher Education and Research in Nordic Countries: who should pay?, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2014, p. 65-74Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the consequences of the turn to managerialism in higher education in England and Sweden, following the introduction of New Public Managementreforms. The paper considers some of the gender implications, which are explored through the accounts of eight, long-serving, female academics. The first interviews were conducted in 2001 with two female academics in Sweden and two in England, and followed up ten years later in 2011-2012 with four new interviewees, all long-serving female academics. The same interview questions were used at both occasions. While there were differences between the two countries, there was also much similarity. In 2001 respondents generally presented a negative picture of the reforms and highlighted the problems of adjusting to them. Ten years later there seemed to be more accommodation to the reforms. And yet the gendered implications of this are significant: women academics are clearly finding it difficult to pursue research to the extent that they would wish, while they are taking on many teaching and administrative functions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2014
Keywords
gender, management
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-20847 (URN)88b469f3-23bd-45cc-9f28-35b5f8e7c306 (Local ID)978-91-7439-974-5 (ISBN)978-91-7439-975-2 (ISBN)88b469f3-23bd-45cc-9f28-35b5f8e7c306 (Archive number)88b469f3-23bd-45cc-9f28-35b5f8e7c306 (OAI)
Note

Godkänd; 2014; 20131127 (elbe)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2022-09-02Bibliographically approved
Barry, J., Berg, E. & Chandler, J. (2014). Gender, managerialsim, and performativity in higher education in England and Sweden (ed.). Journal of Workplace Rights, 17(3-4), 491-503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender, managerialsim, and performativity in higher education in England and Sweden
2014 (English)In: Journal of Workplace Rights, ISSN 1938-4998, E-ISSN 1938-5005, Vol. 17, no 3-4, p. 491-503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we consider the implications of managerial reforms and performativity in higher education in Sweden and England, following the introduction of new public management and the development of neoliberalism. The article examines some gendered implications by drawing on the experiences of eight experienced female academics. The data are drawn from a dataset of interviews. The first interviews we present were conducted at the beginning of 2001 with two long-serving academics from each country. The rest of the interviews we present were conducted 10 years later, with academics who were, like the previous interviewees, long serving. The same interview questions were used for all the interviews. We found differences between the two countries, in terms of social democratic and liberal traditions, as well as similarities. In the earlier interviews, we found the reforms to be viewed negatively, while the later interviews suggested some accommodation in respect of research and management. Yet, despite this, the female academics in both countries had become increasingly subjected to performativity and were experiencing difficulties in undertaking research as they took on more teaching and administration.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4924 (URN)10.2190/WR.17.3-4.n (DOI)2ec95d1e-440f-4771-8b55-90aa9b55d91c (Local ID)2ec95d1e-440f-4771-8b55-90aa9b55d91c (Archive number)2ec95d1e-440f-4771-8b55-90aa9b55d91c (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2014; Bibliografisk uppgift: Ingår i en special issue där Elisabeth Berg tillsammans med Caroline Clark och David Knight har varit guest editor; 20140924 (elbe)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2022-08-31Bibliographically approved
Aarrevaara, T. & Berg, E. (2014). Higher Education and Research: Who should pay? (ed.). Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Higher Education and Research: Who should pay?
2014 (English)Report (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2014. p. 165
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-23557 (URN)7798f61c-47d0-4d9c-a197-6e45aaa31ed9 (Local ID)978-91-7439-974-5 (ISBN)978-91-7439-975-2 (ISBN)7798f61c-47d0-4d9c-a197-6e45aaa31ed9 (Archive number)7798f61c-47d0-4d9c-a197-6e45aaa31ed9 (OAI)
Note

Godkänd; 2014; 20140311 (elbe)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2021-09-03Bibliographically approved
Aarrevaara, T. & Berg, E. (2014). Introduction (ed.). In: (Ed.), Timo Aarrevaara; Elisabeth Berg (Ed.), Higher Education and Research in Academe: Who should pay? (pp. 11-17). Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2014 (English)In: Higher Education and Research in Academe: Who should pay?, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2014, p. 11-17Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2014
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-20048 (URN)17adc71e-baf4-422e-84a9-f88ea5b09edc (Local ID)978-91-7439-974-5 (ISBN)978-91-7439-975-2 (ISBN)17adc71e-baf4-422e-84a9-f88ea5b09edc (Archive number)17adc71e-baf4-422e-84a9-f88ea5b09edc (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2014; 20141202 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2023-09-06Bibliographically approved
Berg, E., Barry, J. & Chandler, J. (2014). The Uncertain Rise of Evidence Based Practice in Social Work in Sweden and England, in Contexts Framed by New Public Management and Neo-liberalism. In: Brigitte Aulenbacher (Ed.), Sorge: Arbeit, Verhältnisse, Regime (pp. 311-324). Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Uncertain Rise of Evidence Based Practice in Social Work in Sweden and England, in Contexts Framed by New Public Management and Neo-liberalism
2014 (English)In: Sorge: Arbeit, Verhältnisse, Regime, Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG , 2014, p. 311-324Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We consider the rise of evidence based practice in social work in Sweden and England, countries with social democratic and liberal welfare regimes respectively, through macro (neo-liberal), meso (new public management) and micro (working routine) levels; we also consider its relation to evidence based medicine. Our analysis shows that outcomes are uncertain and subject to resistance, suggesting the reforms are encountering difficulties embedding and securing support from those involved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG, 2014
Series
Soziale Welt, ISSN 0038-6073 ; Sonderband 20
Keywords
evidence based practice, social work, NPM, Neo-liberalism, work routine, Social Constructionism
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-20205 (URN)2d061517-83b1-4b4c-a575-141923838b76 (Local ID)978-3-8487-1514-5 (ISBN)2d061517-83b1-4b4c-a575-141923838b76 (Archive number)2d061517-83b1-4b4c-a575-141923838b76 (OAI)
Note

Godkänd; 2014; 20131127 (elbe)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2022-09-02Bibliographically approved
Harlow, E., Berg, E., Barry, J. & Chandler, J. (2013). Neoliberalism, managerialism and the reconfiguring of social work in Sweden and the United Kingdom (ed.). Organization, 20(4), 534-550
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neoliberalism, managerialism and the reconfiguring of social work in Sweden and the United Kingdom
2013 (English)In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 534-550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article considers some of the ways in which neoliberalism, through the processes of managerialism, has impacted on the occupation of social work in Sweden and the UK. It is argued that there are similar implications in both countries, through the managerial drive for increased performance in economy, efficiency and effectiveness, but also in the development of evidence based practice. Whilst the key focus of the article is on similarities between these twocountries, differences are also noted. There is also recognition of the way in which resistance to the reconfiguration of social work is taking shape.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-13079 (URN)10.1177/1350508412448222 (DOI)000320702500003 ()2-s2.0-84879984726 (Scopus ID)c3d30d8d-227c-441a-867d-3bebf22c3df1 (Local ID)c3d30d8d-227c-441a-867d-3bebf22c3df1 (Archive number)c3d30d8d-227c-441a-867d-3bebf22c3df1 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20120510 (elbe)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2350-2623

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