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Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Antoniewicz, L., Brynedal, A., Hedman, L., Lundbäck, M. & Bosson, J. A. (2019). Acute Effects of Electronic Cigarette Inhalation on the Vasculature and the Conducting Airways. Cardiovascular Toxicology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute Effects of Electronic Cigarette Inhalation on the Vasculature and the Conducting Airways
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2019 (English)In: Cardiovascular Toxicology, ISSN 1530-7905, E-ISSN 1559-0259Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The use of electronic cigarettes has increased exponentially since its introduction onto the global market in 2006. However, short- and long-term health effects remain largely unknown due to the novelty of this product. The present study examines the acute effects of e-cigarette aerosol inhalation, with and without nicotine, on vascular and pulmonary function in healthy volunteers. Seventeen healthy subjects inhaled electronic cigarette aerosol with and without nicotine on two separate occasions in a double-blinded crossover fashion. Blood pressure, heart rate, and arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis were assessed at baseline, and then at 0 h, 2 h, and 4 h following exposure. Dynamic spirometry and impulse oscillometry were measured following vascular assessments at these time points, as well as at 6 h following exposure. e-Cigarette aerosol with nicotine caused a significant increase in heart rate and arterial stiffness. Furthermore, e-cigarette aerosol-containing nicotine caused a sudden increase in flow resistance as measured by impulse oscillometry, indicating obstruction of the conducting airways. Both aerosols caused an increase in blood pressure. The present study indicates that inhaled e-cigarette aerosol with nicotine has an acute impact on vascular and pulmonary function. Thus, chronic usage may lead to long-term adverse health effects. Further investigation is warranted.

Keywords
Arterial stiffness, Augmentation index, ENDS, Electronic cigarettes, IOS, Pulse wave velocity, e-Cig
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73559 (URN)10.1007/s12012-019-09516-x (DOI)30963443 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2019-04-10
Selberg, S., Hedman, L., Jansson, S.-A., Backman, H. & Stridsman, C. (2019). Asthma control and acute health care visits among young adults with asthma: A population‐based study. Journal of Advanced Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asthma control and acute health care visits among young adults with asthma: A population‐based study
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aims

To study asthma control and acute health care visits among young adults with asthma.

Background

Despite the access to effective treatment and nursing interventions, poor asthma control is still common among individuals with asthma. However, studies describing clinical characteristics among young adults with asthma are rare.

Design

A population‐based cohort study.

Methods

In 2015, as a part of the OLIN pediatric cohort I (recruited in 1996 at age 7‐8yr), N=2291 young adults (27‐28 yr) completed a postal questionnaire survey including questions on asthma and respiratory symptoms. Of these, N=280 (12%) were identified as having current asthma and were further studied.

Results

Of those with current asthma, women reported respiratory symptoms and smoking to a greater extent than men. Approximately one‐fourth had uncontrolled asthma and acute health care visits due to asthma was reported by 15% of women and 8% of men. Uncontrolled asthma was associated with smoking, lower educational level, use of reliever treatment most days and acute health care visits. Acute health care visits due to asthma were associated with periodic use of regular controller treatment also after adjustment for uncontrolled asthma.

Conclusion

The result indicate poor adherence to asthma treatment which may lead to decreased asthma control and acute health care visits.

Impact

Most young adults with asthma are diagnosed and treated in primary care, ideally in a team with a nurse. The main findings highlight the need for evidenced‐based nursing interventions, contributing to a more efficient asthma management in primary care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
asthma, health services, nurses, nursing, patient care, primary healthcare, smoking, treatment adherence and compliance, young adult, quantitative research
National Category
Nursing Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing; Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75786 (URN)10.1111/jan.14174 (DOI)31441107 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-30 Created: 2019-08-30 Last updated: 2019-08-30
Sawalha, S., Hedman, L., Backman, H., Stenfors, N., Rönmark, E., Lundbäck, B. & Lindberg, A. (2019). The impact of comorbidities on mortality among men and women with COPD: report from the OLIN COPD study. Therapeutic Advances in Respiratory Disease, 13, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of comorbidities on mortality among men and women with COPD: report from the OLIN COPD study
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2019 (English)In: Therapeutic Advances in Respiratory Disease, ISSN 1753-4658, Vol. 13, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Comorbidities probably contribute to the increased mortality observed among subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but sex differences in the prognostic impact of comorbidities have rarely been evaluated in population-based studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of common comorbidities, cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM), and anxiety/depression (A/D), on mortality among men and women with and without airway obstruction in a population-based study.

Methods:

All subjects with airway obstruction [forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/(forced) vital capacity ((F)VC) <0.70, n = 993] were, together with age- and sex-matched referents, identified after examinations of population-based cohorts in 2002–2004. Spirometric groups: normal lung function (NLF) and COPD (post-bronchodilator FEV1/(F)VC <0.70) and additionally, LLN-COPD (FEV1/(F)VC <lower limit of normal). Mortality data was collected until December 2015.

Results:

In COPD, the prevalence of CVD and DM was higher in men, whereas the prevalence of A/D was higher in women. The cumulative mortality was significantly higher in COPD than NLF, and higher in men than women in both groups. Among women with COPD, CVD and A/D but not DM increased the risk of death independent of age, body mass index, smoking habits, and disease severity, whereas among men DM and A/D but not CVD increased the risk for death. When the LLN criterion was applied, the pattern was similar.

Conclusion:

There were sex-dependent differences regarding the impact of comorbidities on prognosis in COPD. Even though the prevalence of CVD was higher in men, the impact of CVD on mortality was higher in women, and despite higher prevalence of A/D in women, the impact on mortality was similar in both sexes.

Keywords
chronic airflow obstruction, co-morbidity, epidemiology, mortality, sex
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75604 (URN)10.1177/1753466619860058 (DOI)000478856400001 ()31291820 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068973207 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-08-20 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Rankin, G. D., Wingfors, H., Uski, O., Hedman, L., Hammarström, B. E., Bosson, J. & Lundbäck, M. (2019). The toxic potential of a fourth-generation E-cigarette on human lung cell lines and tissue explants. Journal of Applied Toxicology, 39(8), 1143-1154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The toxic potential of a fourth-generation E-cigarette on human lung cell lines and tissue explants
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Applied Toxicology, ISSN 0260-437X, E-ISSN 1099-1263, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1143-1154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of electronic cigarettes (E-cigs) is rapidly increasing. The latest generation of E-cigs is highly customizable, allowing for high heating coil temperatures. The aim of this study was to assess the toxic potential of a fourth-generation E-cig. Aerosols generated from E-liquid with (24 mg/mL) and without nicotine, using a fourth-generation E-cig, were chemically analysed and compared with cigarette smoke (K3R4F). Human lung epithelial cell lines and distal lung tissue explants were exposed to E-cig vapour extract (EVE) and cigarette smoke extract for 24 hours and assessed for viability, inflammation, oxidative stress and genotoxicity. E-cig aerosols contained measurable levels of volatile organic compounds, aldehydes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, in general, to a much lesser extent than cigarette smoke. Higher levels of certain carbonyls, e.g. formaldehyde, were detected in the E-cig aerosols. EVEs decreased cell viability of BEAS-2B cells, whereas little effect was seen in A549 cells and distal lung tissue. The nicotine-containing EVE caused a greater decrease in cell viability and significant increase in DNA damage than the nicotine-free EVE. Increased cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species production and genotoxicity were seen with cells and tissue exposed to cigarette smoke extract compared with EVEs. Although E-cig aerosols were less toxic than cigarette smoke, it was not benign. Moreover, the EVE containing nicotine was more toxic than the nicotine-free EVE. More research is needed on the short- and long-term health effects of vaping and the usage of newly emerging E-cig devices to evaluate better the potential negative effects of E-cigs on human health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
A549, BEAS-2B, DNA damage, aerosol characterization, cell cycle, electronic cigarette extract, human distal lung tissue, inflammatory cytokines, viability
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73557 (URN)10.1002/jat.3799 (DOI)000475406700006 ()30957912 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063979647 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-07-12 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Hedman, L., Backman, H., Stridsman, C., Bosson, J. A., Lundbäck, M., Lindberg, A., . . . Ekerljung, L. (2018). Association of Electronic Cigarette Use With Smoking Habits, Demographic Factors, and Respiratory Symptoms. JAMA Network Open, 1(3), Article ID e180789.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of Electronic Cigarette Use With Smoking Habits, Demographic Factors, and Respiratory Symptoms
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2018 (English)In: JAMA Network Open, E-ISSN 2574-3805, Vol. 1, no 3, article id e180789Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance  Increases in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) utilization rates suggest that its indications have been expanded to include patients with less severe symptoms. A recent study challenged the cost-effectiveness of TKA in this group of patients.

Objective  To determine the association of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey physical component summary score (SF-36 PCS) with patient satisfaction 2 years after TKA.

Design, Setting, and Participants  This cohort study reviewed registry data from 2 years of follow-up of patients who underwent unilateral TKA from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2014, at a single-center tertiary institution in Singapore. Data were acquired on April 27, 2017, and analyzed from August 15, 2017, to December 22, 2017.

Main Outcomes and Measures  Patient satisfaction and SF-36 PCS. Preoperative disability and postoperative function as measured by the SF-36 PCS were correlated with Δ (2-year end point score minus baseline score) and patient satisfaction, scored on a 6-point Likert scale, with lower scores indicating greater satisfaction.

Results  Of the 6659 patients, 5234 (78.6%) were female and 5753 (86.4%) were of Chinese ethnicity. Mean (SD) age was 67.0 (7.7) years, and mean (SD) body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) was 27.7 (4.6). At 2-year follow-up, the mean (SD) SF-36 PCS score improved from 32.2 (10.1) to 48.2 (9.5) (P < .001). There were 1680 patients (25.2%) who described their satisfaction as excellent, 2574 (38.7%) very good, 1879 (28.2%) good, 382 (5.7%) fair, 96 (1.4%) poor, and 48 (0.7%) terrible. The minimal clinically important difference (change in SF-36 PCS of 10 from baseline) was met in 4515 patients (67.8%), and overall satisfaction was 97.8% (6515 patients). Covariance analysis showed significantly higher satisfaction in patients with preoperative scores of 40 to less than 50. Patients who were unlikely to meet the minimal clinically important difference compared with those who were likely to meet it (SF-36 PCS of ≥42.1 vs <42.1) had significantly higher 2-year satisfaction (mean [SD], 2.15 [0.9] vs 2.23 [1.0]; P = .009).

Conclusions and Relevance  The findings suggest that a general health score, such as SF-36, is not associated with patient satisfaction 2 years after TKA. Functional assessment, preoperative counseling, and modification of expectations appear to remain vital before TKA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association, 2018
National Category
Nursing Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing; Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73046 (URN)10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.0789 (DOI)000452641400010 ()30646032 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-27 Created: 2019-02-27 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Backman, H., Jansson, S.-A., Stridsman, C., Muellerova, H., Wurst, K., Hedman, L., . . . Rönmark, E. (2018). Chronic airway obstruction in a population-based adult asthma cohort: Prevalence, incidence and prognostic factors. Respiratory Medicine, 138, 115-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic airway obstruction in a population-based adult asthma cohort: Prevalence, incidence and prognostic factors
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2018 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 138, p. 115-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Asthma and COPD may overlap (ACO) but information about incidence and risk factors are lacking. This study aimed to estimate prevalence, incidence and risk factors of chronic airway obstruction (CAO) in a population-based adult asthma cohort.

Methods

During 1986–2001 a large population-based asthma cohort was identified (n = 2055, 19-72y). Subsamples have participated in clinical follow-ups during the subsequent years. The entire cohort was invited to a clinical follow-up including interview, spirometry, and blood sampling in 2012–2014 when n = 983 subjects performed adequate spirometry. CAO was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC<0.7.

Results

At study entry, asthmatics with prevalent CAO (11.4%) reported more respiratory symptoms, asthma medication use, and ischemic heart disease than asthmatics without CAO (asthma only). Subjects who developed CAO during follow-up (17.6%; incidence rate of 16/1000/year) had a more rapid FEV1 decline and higher levels of neutrophils than asthma only. Smoking, older age and male sex were independently associated with increased risk for both prevalent and incident CAO, while obesity had a protective effect.

Conclusions

In this prospective adult asthma cohort, the majority did not develop CAO. Smoking, older age and male sex were risk factors for prevalent and incident CAO, similar to risk factors described for COPD in the general population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Nursing Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing; Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68195 (URN)10.1016/j.rmed.2018.03.036 (DOI)000432442400017 ()2-s2.0-85045212522 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-04-13 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2018-04-05 Created: 2018-04-05 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Schyllert, C., Andersson, M., Hedman, L., Ekström, M., Backman, H., Lindberg, A. & Rönmark, E. (2018). Job titles classified into socioeconomic and occupational groups identify subjects with increased risk for respiratory symptoms independent of occupational exposure to vapour, gas, dust, or fumes. European Clinical Respiratory Journal, 5(1), Article ID 1468715.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Job titles classified into socioeconomic and occupational groups identify subjects with increased risk for respiratory symptoms independent of occupational exposure to vapour, gas, dust, or fumes
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2018 (English)In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 1468715Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To evaluate the ability of three different job title classification systems to identify subjects at risk for respiratory symptoms and asthma by also taking the effect of exposure to vapours, gas, dust, and fumes (VGDF) into account. Background: Respiratory symptoms and asthma may be caused by occupational factors. There are different ways to classify occupational exposure. In this study, self-reported occupational exposure to vapours, gas, dust and fumes was used as well as job titles classifed into occupational and socioeconomic Groups according to three different systems. Design: This was a large population-based study of adults aged 30-69 years in Northern Sweden (n = 9,992, 50% women). Information on job titles, VGDF-exposure, smoking habits, asthma and respiratory symptoms was collected by a postal survey. Job titles were used for classification into socioeconomic and occupational groups based on three classification systems; Socioeconomic classification (SEI), the Nordic Occupations Classification 1983 (NYK), and the Swedish Standard Classification of Occupations 2012 (SSYK). Associations were analysed by multivariable logistic regression. Results: Occupational exposure to VGDF was a risk factor for all respiratory symptoms and asthma (odds ratios (ORs) 1.3-2.4). Productive cough was associated with the socioeconomic groups of manual workers (ORs 1.5-2.1) and non-manual employees (ORs 1.6-1.9). These groups include occupations such as construction and transportation workers, service workers, nurses, teachers and administration clerks which by the SSYK classification were associated with productive cough (ORs 2.4-3.7). Recurrent wheeze was significantly associated with the SEI group manual workers (ORs 1.5-1.7). After adjustment for also VGDF, productive cough remained significantly associated with the SEI groups manual workers in service and non-manual employees, and the SSYK-occupational groups administration, service, and elementary occupations. Conclusions: In this cross-sectional study, two of the three different classification systems, SSYK and SEI gave similar results and identified groups with increased risk for respiratory symptoms while NYK did not give conclusive results. Furthermore, several associations were independent of exposure to VGDF indicating that also other job-related factors than VGDF are of importance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Asthma, occupational exposure, socioeconomic status
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68932 (URN)10.1080/20018525.2018.1468715 (DOI)000432538500001 ()29785256 (PubMedID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-12-04 (marisr)

Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-12-04Bibliographically approved
Stridsman, C., Svensson, M., Johansson Strandkvist, V., Hedman, L., Backman, H. & Lindberg, A. (2018). The COPD Assessment Test (CAT) can screen for fatigue among patients with COPD. Therapeutic advances in respiratory disease, 12, Article ID 1753466618787380.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The COPD Assessment Test (CAT) can screen for fatigue among patients with COPD
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2018 (English)In: Therapeutic advances in respiratory disease, ISSN 1753-4658, Vol. 12, article id 1753466618787380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms among subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but is rarely identified in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between fatigue and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) assessed with clinically useful instruments, both among subjects with and without COPD. Further, to investigate the association between fatigue and the COPD Assessment Test (CAT)-energy question.

Methods:

Data were collected in 2014 within the population-based OLIN COPD study. Subjects with (n = 367) and without (n = 428) COPD participated in clinical examinations including spirometry and completed questionnaires about fatigue (FACIT-Fatigue, clinically relevant fatigue ⩽43), and HRQoL (EQ-5D-VAS, lower score = worse health; CAT, lower score = fewer symptoms/better health).

Results:

Subjects with clinically relevant fatigue had worse HRQoL measured with EQ-5D-VAS, regardless of having COPD or not. Decreasing EQ-5D-VAS scores, any respiratory symptoms and anxiety/depression were associated with clinically relevant fatigue also when adjusted for confounders. Among subjects with COPD, clinically relevant fatigue was associated with increasing total CAT score, and CAT score ⩾10. The proportion of subjects with clinically relevant fatigue increased significantly, with a higher score on the CAT-energy question, and nearly 50% of those with a score of 2, and 70% of those with a score of ⩾3, had clinically relevant fatigue.

Conclusions:

Fatigue was associated with respiratory symptoms, anxiety/depression and worse HRQoL when using the clinically useful instruments EQ-5D-VAS and CAT. The CAT-energy question can be used to screen for fatigue in clinical practice, using a cut-off of ⩾2.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Open, 2018
National Category
Nursing Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70212 (URN)10.1177/1753466618787380 (DOI)000455407900001 ()30035671 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054592561 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-08-06 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Backman, H., Hedman, L., Stridsman, C., Jansson, S.-A., Lindberg, A., Lundbäck, B. & Rönmark, E. (2017). A population-based cohort of adults with asthma: mortality and participation in a long-term follow-up. European Clinical Respiratory Journal, 4(1), Article ID 1334508.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A population-based cohort of adults with asthma: mortality and participation in a long-term follow-up
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2017 (English)In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 1334508Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and objective: Asthma is a major public health concern. The aim of this study was to characterize a large population-based cohort of adults with asthma, and to study factors associated with all-cause mortality and non-participation in a long-term follow-up. Design: Random and stratified samples from five population-based cohorts were clinically examined during 1986-2001, and all subjects with asthma were included in the study (n = 2055, age 19-72 years, 55% women). Independent associations between different risk factors and (i) mortality and (ii) non-participation in a clinical follow-up in 2012-2014 were estimated. Results: In 1986-2001, 95% reported any wheeze and/or attacks of shortness of breath in the past 12 months, and/or asthma medication use. Over the up to 28 years of follow-up time, the cumulative mortality was 22.7%. Male gender, current smoking, and lower forced expiratory volume in 1 sec of predicted (FEV1% of predicted) were independent risk factors for mortality, while obesity was associated with non-participation in the follow-up. Older ages, ischemic heart disease, and low socioeconomic status were associated with both mortality and non-participation. Conclusions: The risk factors associated with mortality in this adult population-based asthma cohort were similar to those commonly identified in general population samples, i.e. male gender, current smoking, and lower FEV1% of predicted, while obesity was associated with non-participation in a long-term follow-up. Ischemic heart disease, low socioeconomic status, and older ages were associated with both mortality and non-participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65110 (URN)10.1080/20018525.2017.1334508 (DOI)000403663400001 ()28680543 (PubMedID)
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-08-15 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Stridsman, C., Backman, H., Eklund, B.-M., Rönmark, E. & Hedman, L. (2017). Adolescent girls with asthma have worse asthma control and health-related quality of life than boys: A population based study. Pediatric Pulmonology, 52(7), 866-872
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent girls with asthma have worse asthma control and health-related quality of life than boys: A population based study
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2017 (English)In: Pediatric Pulmonology, ISSN 8755-6863, E-ISSN 1099-0496, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 866-872Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Population-based studies investigating health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among asthmatic adolescents are rare. Further, among subjects with asthma, HRQoL may be affected by asthma control and severity.

Aim

To investigate HRQoL in relation to asthma control and asthma severity among adolescents.

Method

As a part of the population-based OLIN pediatric study, 266 adolescents with current asthma (14-15 yr) were identified. N = 247 completed the DISABKIDS HRQoL asthma module, including the domains impact and worry. The Asthma Control Test (ACT) was used and a disease severity score was calculated based on symptoms and medicine use.

Results

The prevalence of current asthma was 11%. Well-controlled asthma was reported by 15% of the adolescents, and 53% had partly controlled asthma. The prevalence of uncontrolled asthma was significantly higher among girls than boys (38% vs 25%), and girls also reported lower HRQoL scores. There was a fairly strong correlation between the ACT and DISABKIDS scores. Independent risk factors for low HRQoL impact (a score <67) were female sex (OR 4.66, 95%CI 1.82-9.54) and decreased ACT scores (1.38, 1.18-1.62). Risk factors for low HRQoL worry (a score <70) were female sex (3.33, 1.41-7.86), decreased ACT scores (1.35, 1.16-1.57), severe asthma (6.23, 1.46-16.50), and having current eczema (2.68, 1.00-7.24).

Conclusion

Only a minority of the asthmatic adolescents reported well-controlled asthma, and poor asthma control and female sex were risk factors for low HRQoL. Our results demonstrate that evaluation of asthma control is of great importance for asthma management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
National Category
Nursing Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing; Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63171 (URN)10.1002/ppul.23723 (DOI)000403325700004 ()28444980 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018346286 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-06-14 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2017-04-27 Created: 2017-04-27 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1630-3167

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