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Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Geng, S., Noël, M., Liu, P. & Oksman, K. (2016). Cellulose-based nanocomposites with outstanding dispersion produced by in-situ polymerization (ed.). Paper presented at American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting & Exposition : 13/03/2016 - 17/03/2016. Paper presented at American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting & Exposition : 13/03/2016 - 17/03/2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cellulose-based nanocomposites with outstanding dispersion produced by in-situ polymerization
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cellulose-based nanocomposites are promising materials to replace the fossil-based polymers since they are biodegradable and produced from renewable resources. However, achieving good dispersion of nanocellulose in the matrix is one of the main obstacles because nanomaterials tend to form aggregates and lose their merits. In this study we developed an in-situ polymerization method to produce cellulose nanocrystals reinforced polyvinyl acetate, and the method of direct mechanical mixing was used as reference. The stability of in-situ and mixed nanocomposite aqueous dispersions was investigated by zeta potential measurements, and the results show that both of them were electrostatic stable at pH 4. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the dispersion of cellulose nanocrystals in the in-situ and mixed nanocomposites after drying, and better dispersion could be seen in the in-situ samples compared with the mixed ones. Tensile testing showed that the in-situ nanocomposites with same cellulose content had higher strength and longer elongation at break compared to the mixed nanocomposites. Furthermore, crosslinking the cellulose and partially hydrolyzed polyvinyl acetate with sodium tetraborate was also performed to further improved the reinforcing efficiency. The results from Raman spectroscopy illustrate that the heavy atoms (CC and CO) in cellulose experienced more stretching in the crosslinked nanocomposites, and the tensile testing indicated the elastic modulus and ultimate strength of them were increased significantly than those without crosslinking.

National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-31334 (URN)57c1b390-8309-46a3-8ce8-3ce137323856 (Local ID)57c1b390-8309-46a3-8ce8-3ce137323856 (Archive number)57c1b390-8309-46a3-8ce8-3ce137323856 (OAI)
Conference
American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting & Exposition : 13/03/2016 - 17/03/2016
Note
Godkänd; 2016; 20160331 (shigen)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Aitomäki, Y., Berglund, L., Noël, M., Linder, T., Löfqvist, T. & Oksman, K. (2016). Light scattering in cellulose nanofibre suspensions: Model and experiments (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), Computers in Chemistry Proceeding from ACS National Meeting San Diego: Proceeding from ACS National Meeting San Diego. Paper presented at American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting & Exposition : 13/03/2016 - 17/03/2016 (pp. 122). : American Chemical Society (ACS), Article ID CELL 235.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Light scattering in cellulose nanofibre suspensions: Model and experiments
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2016 (English)In: Computers in Chemistry Proceeding from ACS National Meeting San Diego: Proceeding from ACS National Meeting San Diego, American Chemical Society (ACS), 2016, p. 122-, article id CELL 235Conference paper, Meeting abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Here light scattering theory is used to assess the size distribution in a suspension of cellulose as it is fibrillated from micro-scaled to nano-scaled fibres. A model based on Monte carlo simulations of the scattering of photons by different sizes of cellulose fibres was used to predict the UV-IF spectrum of the suspensions. Bleached cellulose hardwood pulp was tested and compared to the visually transparent tempo-oxidised hardwood cellulose nanofibres (CNF) suspension. The theoretical results show that different diameter size classes exhibit very different scattering patterns. These classes could be identified in the experimental results and used to establish the size class dominating the suspension. A comparison to AFM/microscope size distribution was made and the results indicated that using the UV-IF light scattering spectrum maybe more reliable that size distribution measurement using AFM and microscopy on dried CNF samples. The UV-IF spectrum measurement combined with the theoretical prediction can be used even at this initial stage of development of this model to assess the degree of fibrillation when processing CNF.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2016
National Category
Bio Materials Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites; Industrial Electronics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-27433 (URN)0e1f8cb1-032d-4e71-956c-b2aca7925036 (Local ID)0e1f8cb1-032d-4e71-956c-b2aca7925036 (Archive number)0e1f8cb1-032d-4e71-956c-b2aca7925036 (OAI)
Conference
American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting & Exposition : 13/03/2016 - 17/03/2016
Note
Godkänd; 2016; 20160418 (aitomaki)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Berglund, L., Noël, M., Aitomäki, Y., Öman, T. & Oksman, K. (2016). Production potential of cellulose nanofibers from industrial residues: Efficiency and nanofiber characteristics (ed.). Industrial crops and products (Print), 92, 84-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production potential of cellulose nanofibers from industrial residues: Efficiency and nanofiber characteristics
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2016 (English)In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 92, p. 84-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the production potential of cellulose nanofibers from two different industrial bio-residues: wastes from the juice industry (carrot) and the beer brewing process (BSG). The mechanical separation of the cellulose nanofibers was by ultrafine grinding. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the materials were mechanically isolated without significantly affecting their crystallinity. The carrot residue was more easily bleached and consumed less energy during grinding, using only 0.9 kWh/kg compared to 21 kWh/kg for the BSG. The carrot residue also had a 10% higher yield than the BSG. Moreover, the dried nanofiber networks showed high mechanical properties, with an average modulus and strength of 12.9 GPa and 210 MPa, respectively, thus indicating a homogeneous nanosize distribution. The study showed that carrot residue has great potential for the industrial production of cellulose nanofibers due to its high quality, processing efficiency, and low raw material cost

National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-15472 (URN)10.1016/j.indcrop.2016.08.003 (DOI)000383821200011 ()2-s2.0-84981234074 (Scopus ID)efda8f84-abf4-42da-9c15-95ea7b63b56e (Local ID)efda8f84-abf4-42da-9c15-95ea7b63b56e (Archive number)efda8f84-abf4-42da-9c15-95ea7b63b56e (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20160815 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2019-09-19Bibliographically approved
Geng, S., Noël, M., Liu, P. & Oksman, K. (2015). Single-step method for producing cellulose based nanocomposites with outstanding dispersion (ed.). Paper presented at Marcus Wallenberg Prize Event – Young Researchers’ Challenge 2015 : 28/09/2015 - 30/09/2015. Paper presented at Marcus Wallenberg Prize Event – Young Researchers’ Challenge 2015 : 28/09/2015 - 30/09/2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single-step method for producing cellulose based nanocomposites with outstanding dispersion
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cellulose nanomaterials are promising as reinforcement in composites, which is attributed to high mechanical properties, generating large interfacial area and biodegradable ability, etc. However, obtaining good dispersion is a main challenge of large-scale industrial applications since nanomaterials tend to form aggregates and lose their merits. In this study we developed a single-step method that is in-situ polymerization to produce cellulose nanocrystals reinforced polyvinyl acetate with good dispersion. Compared to normal composites prepared by direct mechanical mixing, better dispersion of cellulose nanocrystals by using in-situ polymerization has been confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Mechanical testing shown that the in-situ nanocomposites with same cellulose content had higher strength and longer elongation at break compared to direct mixed composites. Moreover, crosslinks between cellulose and partially hydrolysed polyvinyl acetate could be formed by tetrahydroborate ions in aqueous dispersion, which further improved the reinforcing efficiency. The cellulose based nanocomposites produced by in-situ polymerization are potential materials to replace fossil based polymers used in packaging and coating applications.

National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-35289 (URN)9c261215-c6c5-4608-b96c-cf2abe26f6a4 (Local ID)9c261215-c6c5-4608-b96c-cf2abe26f6a4 (Archive number)9c261215-c6c5-4608-b96c-cf2abe26f6a4 (OAI)
Conference
Marcus Wallenberg Prize Event – Young Researchers’ Challenge 2015 : 28/09/2015 - 30/09/2015
Note
Godkänd; 2015; 20160331 (shigen)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Noël, M. (2014). Physical Properties and Structural stability of carbon nanotubes under extreme conditions (ed.). (Licentiate dissertation). Paper presented at .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Properties and Structural stability of carbon nanotubes under extreme conditions
2014 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted an immense attention of the research community since reporting on this system by S. Ijima in 1991. A "single-walled" CNT (SWCNT) can be considered as a rolled-up single-layer graphene - a one atom-thick layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. This cylindrical object being just about 1 nm in diameter and up to a few centimeters long can be considered a quasi-one-dimensional system. Several nanotubes "inserted" one into another build a so-called multi-walled CNT. CNTs exhibit outstanding mechanical, thermal and electronic properties which make this material a promising candidate for numerous applications - reinforced compositematerials, nano-electronics, molecular sensors and drug delivery systems to namejust a few. Carbon nanotubes possess tensile strength 10 and 5 times higher than that of steel and Kevlar, respectively, that creates a great prospective for their use as reinforcing units in materials subjected to high-impact dynamic loads/stress (bullet-proof jackets, for example). Nonetheless, to date there are no reports on experimental study of CNTs behavior at extreme dynamic loads which may substantiate such prospective. In addition, several theoretical predictions indicate a possibility of CNTs transformation into new structural forms at extreme pressures. The goal of this work is a systematic study of structural properties and exploration possibility of synthesis of new materials from CNTs under extreme pressures/stress.In a set of experiments purified SWCNTs were subjected to high dynamic (shock) pressures up to 52 GPa. Recovered from each pressure step sample was characterized by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. We observed a gradual increase of defects concentration on the CNT surface with pressure along with shortening and "un-zipping" of the tubes with an onset of the complete CNT destruction at 26 GPa shock which sets-up a limit for certain practical applications of this kind of material. Further increase of the dynamic load to 35 and 52 GPa revealed CNT transformation into a mixture of disordered sp2/sp3- bonded carbon atoms with nanosized graphene clusters. No CNT polymerization or coalescence was observed contraryto some theoretical predictions. For comparison, we conducted a separate experiment on the same CNT material under static compression up to 36 GPa in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The system evolution was monitored in-situ during the high-pressure run using Raman spectroscopy. Examination of the material recovered from high pressure revealed that certain fraction of the CNTs survived exposure to 36 GPa though similar damages were introduced to the nanotubes as in the shock experiments as evidenced by the Raman spectra. This result testifies for a substantial difference in the processes of CNT destruction by dynamic vs static compression. Change of CNTs structure results in the altering their electronic properties thus structure evolution of the CNTs with pressure may be followed by monitoring electrical resistance change with pressure. In a series of experiments we conducted in-situ electrical resistance (R) measurements of the SWCNTs under static pressures up to 45 GPa (temperature range 293 - 395 K) in a conductive DAC. Isobaric temperature dependence of the resistance indicated that the nanotube sample is comprised predominantly from semiconducting CNTs. A set of anomalies observed in R(p) at room temperature we interpret as a sequential, diameter-dependent collapse of the CNTs. Raman characterization of the samples after the pressure cycling confirmed reversibility of this structural transition for at least certain CNT species accompanied by a substantial increase of CNT defects density. No indication of nanotubes polymerization was observed.

Series
Licentiate thesis / Luleå University of Technology, ISSN 1402-1757
National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Experimental physics; Fysik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-17581 (URN)416c8999-0d62-41b9-9b7f-3465806ed081 (Local ID)978-91-7583-103-9 (ISBN)978-91-7583-104-6 (ISBN)416c8999-0d62-41b9-9b7f-3465806ed081 (Archive number)416c8999-0d62-41b9-9b7f-3465806ed081 (OAI)
Note

Godkänd; 2014; 20141106 (maxnoe); Nedanstående person kommer att hålla licentiatseminarium för avläggande av teknologie licentiatexamen. Namn: Maxime Noël Ämne: Fysik/Physics Uppsats: Physical Properties and Structural Stability of Carbon Nanotubes Under Extreme Conditions Examinator: Professor Alexander Soldatov, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Luleå tekniska universitet Diskutant: Professor Roberts Joffe, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Luleå tekniska universitet Tid: Tisdag den 9 december 2014 kl 10.00 Plats: E243, Luleå tekniska universitet

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Noël, M. (2014). Physical properties and structural stability of carbon nanotubes under extreme conditions (ed.). (Doctoral dissertation). Paper presented at . : Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical properties and structural stability of carbon nanotubes under extreme conditions
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted an immense attention of the research community since reporting on this system by S. Ijima in 1991. A "single-walled" CNT (SWCNT) can be considered as a rolled-up single-layer graphene - a one atom-thick layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. This cylindrical object being just about 1 nm in diameter and up to a few centimeters long can be considered as a quasi-one-dimensional system. Several nanotubes "inserted" one into another build a so-called multi-walled CNT. CNTs exhibit outstanding mechanical, thermal and electronic properties which make this material a promising candidate for numerous applications - reinforced composite materials, nano-electronics, molecular sensors and drug delivery systems to name just a few. CNTs possess tensile strength 10 and 5 times higher than that of steel and Kevlar, respectively, that creates a great prospective for their use as reinforcing units in materials subjected to high-impact dynamic loads/stress (bullet-proof jackets, for example). Nonetheless, to date there are no reports on experimental study of CNTs behavior at extreme dynamic loads which may substantiate such prospective. In addition, several theoretical predictions indicate a possibility of CNTs transformation into new structural forms at extreme pressures. The goal of this work is a systematic study of structural properties and exploration possibility of synthesis of new materials from CNTs under extreme pressures/stress.In a set of experiments purified SWCNTs were subjected to high dynamic (shock) pressures up to 52 GPa. Recovered from each pressure step sample was characterized by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. We observed a gradual increase of defects concentration on the CNT surface with pressure along with shortening and "un-zipping" of the tubes and an onset of the complete CNT destruction at 26 GPa shock which sets-up a limit for certain practical applications of this kind of material. Further increase of the dynamic load to 35 and 52 GPa led to CNT transformation into a mixture of disordered sp²/sp³- bonded carbon atoms with nano-sized graphene clusters. No CNT polymerization or coalescence was observed contrary to some theoretical predictions. For comparison, we conducted a separate experiment on the same CNT material under static compression up to 36 GPa in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The system evolution was monitored in-situ during the high-pressure run using Raman spectroscopy. Examination of the material recovered from high pressure revealed that certain fraction of the CNTs survived exposure to 36 GPa though similar damages were introduced to the nanotubes as in the shock experiments evidenced by the Raman spectra. This result testifies a substantial difference in the processes of CNT destruction by dynamic vs static compression.A separate set of experiments in DACs was aimed at in-situ monitoring of the Raman spectra (in particular G-band) during pressure evolution and establishing the level of static pressure which causes a complete destruction of SWCNTs from the same batch as used in similar experiments at the dynamic compression. Pressure dependence of G-band, G(p), exhibited several peculiarities at approximately 15, 45 and 60 GPa which we associate with collapse of large (1.2 nm) and small (∼1 nm) diameter CNTs, and an onset of nanotubes transformation to a new phase respectively. Raman spectra of the sample recovered after 58 GPa static compression exhibit no RBM signal, large G-band broadening and high D/G peak intensity ratio that testifies for CNT destruction. Pressure increase to 100 GPa resulted in a substantial altering of Raman spectrum of the recovered sample - appearance of characteristic features of highly disordered sp²-and sp³-bonded carbons which may stem from interlinked nano-sized graphene clusters.Change of CNTs structure results in the altering of their electronic properties thus structure evolution of the CNTs with pressure may be followed by monitoring electrical resistance change with pressure. In a series of experiments we conducted in-situ electrical resistance (R) measurements of the SWCNTs under static pressures up to 45 GPa (temperature range 293 - 395 K) in a conductive DAC. Isobaric temperature dependence of the resistance indicated that the nanotube sample is comprised predominantly of semiconducting CNTs. A set of anomalies observed in R(p) at room temperature we interpret as a sequential, diameter-dependent collapse of the CNTs. Raman characterization of the samples after the pressure cycling confirmed reversibility of these structural transitions for at least certain CNT species accompanied by a substantial increase of CNT defects density. No indication of nanotubes polymerization was observed.Although thermal conductivity of individual CNTs is excellent (5 times better than that of copper) heat conduction becomes far less efficient in "conventional" system, i.e. when the tubes form bundles/ropes which may lead to a risk of CNT destruction by overheating. Therefore probing CNTs response to extreme heat (temperature) is important both for testing capabilities of the nanotube material and developing methods of its proper characterization. We followed temporal evolution of the Raman spectra of bundled SWCNTs exposed to high laser irradiance in both air and argon atmosphere. Temperature threshold for CNT destruction in air appeared to be lower than that in Ar, the fact indicating importance of the CNTs oxidation for their structural integrity. We show that primary damage occurs in resonant with excitation laser CNTs which act as photon energy absorbers. We show that smaller diameter and metallic nanotubes are less stable to high irradiance/heat flux than their large diameter/semiconducting counterparts. Remarkably, some small diameter, non-resonant CNTs were destroyed indirectly, i.e. via overheating induced by neighbor CNTs in resonance (photon absorbers). We demonstrate the importance of laser heating effects on Raman characterization of nanotubes.Even though carbon nanotubes exhibit susceptibility to extreme pressure/stress and high laser irradiance/overheating their potential for use in very demanding applications is not yet challenged: for example SWCNT destruction under dynamic compression occurs at pressure exceeding 20 times the typical threshold levels in ballistic impact. Cold compression of nanotubes also opens up perspectives of synthesis of new carbon phases with superior mechanical properties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå tekniska universitet, 2014
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Experimental physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-26630 (URN)f486e231-9259-4b0e-87ac-9542bc00f8e9 (Local ID)978-91-7583-203-6 (ISBN)978-91-7583-204-3 (ISBN)f486e231-9259-4b0e-87ac-9542bc00f8e9 (Archive number)f486e231-9259-4b0e-87ac-9542bc00f8e9 (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2014; 20141216 (maxnoe); Nedanstående person kommer att disputera för avläggande av teknologie doktorsexamen. Namn: Maxime Noël Ämne: Fysik/Physics Avhandling: Physical Properties and Structural Stability of Carbon Nanotubes Under Extreme Conditions Opponent: Professor David Dunstan, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, University of London, London, Ordförande: Professor Alexander Soldatov, Avd för materialvetenskap, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Luleå tekniska universitet Tid: Fredag den 30 januari, kl 10.00 Plats: E231, Luleå tekniska universitetAvailable from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Noël, M., Ananev, S., Mases, M., Devaux, X., Lee, J., Evdokimov, I., . . . Soldatov, A. (2014). Probing structural integrity of single walled carbon nanotubes by dynamic and static compression (ed.). Paper presented at . Physica Status Solidi. Rapid Research Letters, 8(11), 935-938, Article ID 4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probing structural integrity of single walled carbon nanotubes by dynamic and static compression
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2014 (English)In: Physica Status Solidi. Rapid Research Letters, ISSN 1862-6254, E-ISSN 1862-6270, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 935-938, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report on a first study of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) after application of dynamic (shock) compression. The experiments were conducted at 19 GPa and 36 GPa in a recovery assembly. For comparison, an experiment at a static pressure of 36 GPa was performed on the material from the same batch in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). After the high pressure treatment the samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After exposure to 19 GPa of shock compression the CNT material exhibited substantial structural damage such as CNT wall disruption, opening of the tube along its axis (“unzipping”) and tube shortening (“cutting”). Dynamic compression to 36 GPa resulted in essentially complete CNT destruction whereas at least a fraction of the nanotubes was recovered after 36 GPa of static compression though severely damaged. The results of these shock wave experiments underline the prospect of using SWCNTs as reinforcing units in material

National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Experimental physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-2389 (URN)10.1002/pssr.201409353 (DOI)000345274300010 ()2-s2.0-84910679063 (Scopus ID)00027906-f0eb-4cda-9952-cad4e7041d92 (Local ID)00027906-f0eb-4cda-9952-cad4e7041d92 (Archive number)00027906-f0eb-4cda-9952-cad4e7041d92 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140912 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Noël, M., Volkova, Y., Mases, M., Zelenovskiy, P., Babushkin, A. & Soldatov, A. (2013). Effects of non-hydrostatic pressure on electrical resistance of bundled single-wall carbon nanotubes (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), 7th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research: 21–22 March 2013, LTU, Luleå, Sweden. Paper presented at EEIGM International Conference on Advanced materials research : 21/03/2013 - 22/03/2013. : IOP Publishing Ltd, Article ID 12013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of non-hydrostatic pressure on electrical resistance of bundled single-wall carbon nanotubes
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2013 (English)In: 7th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research: 21–22 March 2013, LTU, Luleå, Sweden, IOP Publishing Ltd , 2013, article id 12013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recent studies have shown that single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit a sequence of phase transitions and demonstrate a high structural stability up to 35 GPa of quasi-hydrostatic pressure [1] beyond which an irreversible structural transformation occurs. Here we report on the study of electrical resistance of SWCNTs at pressures up to 34 GPa in the temperature range of 293 – 395 K. In the pressure range 10–25 GPathe rate of resistance change decreases considerably. We associate such behavior of the resistance with a structural modification of the SWCNTs or/and change of the conductivity character at high pressure. Raman spectra of the samples recovered after 30 GPa exhibit a large increase of defect concentration in the CNTs. Isobaric temperature dependences of the CNT resistance R(T) measured in the temperature range 300–400 K reveal some changes with pressure whereas the semiconducting character of the R(T) remains unaltered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOP Publishing Ltd, 2013
Series
I O P Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, ISSN 1757-8981 ; 1
National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Experimental physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-31620 (URN)10.1088/1757-899X/48/1/012013 (DOI)000329228200013 ()2-s2.0-84893627755 (Scopus ID)5dcb6c84-9dcf-4dc5-acfc-4890136eebdf (Local ID)5dcb6c84-9dcf-4dc5-acfc-4890136eebdf (Archive number)5dcb6c84-9dcf-4dc5-acfc-4890136eebdf (OAI)
Conference
EEIGM International Conference on Advanced materials research : 21/03/2013 - 22/03/2013
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20131213 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Noël, M., Volkova, Y., Zelenovskiy, P., Mases, M., Babushkin, A. & Soldatov, A. (2013). Electrical transport in bundled single-wall carbon nanotubes under high pressure (ed.). Paper presented at EEIGM International Conference on Advanced materials research : 21/03/2013 - 22/03/2013. Paper presented at EEIGM International Conference on Advanced materials research : 21/03/2013 - 22/03/2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electrical transport in bundled single-wall carbon nanotubes under high pressure
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2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

According to recent experimental data single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit a sequence of phase transitions and demonstrate a high structural stability up to 35 GPa of non-hydrostatic pressure beyond which an irreversible transformation occurs. Here we report a study of electrical transport in SWCNTs at pressures up to 45 GPa in the temperature range of 300 - 400K. High pressure was generated in diamond anvil cell. The anvils are made of electrically conducting "carbonado"-type synthetic diamond. In the pressure range 10-25 GPa the CNT electrical resistance decreases considerably, whereas above 25 GPa it remains essentially unchanged. Such behaviour of the resistance can be connected to a structural modification of the SWCNTs accompanied by change of the conductivity character at high pressure. Raman spectra of the samples recovered after 30 GPa exhibit a large increase of D/G band intensity ratio. The Radial Breathing Mode part of the spectra remains essentially unaltered which testifies for structural integrity of the nanotubes after exposure to high non-hydrostatic pressure and lack of covalent interlinking between the tubes. Pressure dependences of resistance, activation energy for conductivity and charge carriers mobility were determined and discussed.

National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Experimental physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-34856 (URN)9293cfca-b36a-41ee-8178-9e4bf23863a1 (Local ID)9293cfca-b36a-41ee-8178-9e4bf23863a1 (Archive number)9293cfca-b36a-41ee-8178-9e4bf23863a1 (OAI)
Conference
EEIGM International Conference on Advanced materials research : 21/03/2013 - 22/03/2013
Note
Godkänd; 2013; 20130926 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Allali, N., Urbanova, V., Etienne, M., Mallet, M., Devaux, X., Vigolo, B., . . . Mamane, V. (2013). Electrocatalytic effect towards NADH induced by HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized by ferrocene derivatives (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), 2012 MRS Fall Meeting: Symposium YY – Low-Voltage Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Materials Characterization. Paper presented at MRS Fall Meeting and Exhibit : 25/11/2012 - 30/11/2012. : Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electrocatalytic effect towards NADH induced by HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized by ferrocene derivatives
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2013 (English)In: 2012 MRS Fall Meeting: Symposium YY – Low-Voltage Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Materials Characterization, Cambridge University Press, 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The present work reports the covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by ferrocene derivatives with polyethyleneglycol linkers. A very clean initial sample was chosen to avoid any residual catalyst and carbon impurities. Functionalized SWCNTs (f-CNTs) are deposited on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and this modified electrode is used for oxidizing the cofactor NADH (dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) in the presence of diaphorase. A clear electrocatalytic effect is evidenced, which can only be attributed to the f-CNTs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2013
Series
Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, ISSN 0272-9172 ; 1531
National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Experimental physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-39597 (URN)10.1557/opl.2013.84 (DOI)84900314772 (Scopus ID)e6c3c749-2cd0-456c-b67c-80a026d41834 (Local ID)e6c3c749-2cd0-456c-b67c-80a026d41834 (Archive number)e6c3c749-2cd0-456c-b67c-80a026d41834 (OAI)
Conference
MRS Fall Meeting and Exhibit : 25/11/2012 - 30/11/2012
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20130301 (maxnoe)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4254-5020

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