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BETA
Wälivaara, Britt-MarieORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3400-323x
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Gustafsson, S., Wälivaara, B.-M. & Gabrielsson, S. (2019). Patient Satisfaction With Telephone Nursing: A Call for Calm, Clarity, and Competence. Journal of Nursing Care Quality
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient Satisfaction With Telephone Nursing: A Call for Calm, Clarity, and Competence
2019 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Care Quality, ISSN 1057-3631, E-ISSN 1550-5065Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background:Studies of patient satisfaction with telephone nursing can provide a better understanding of callers' needs and inform the improvement of services.Purpose:This study described patients' experiences and perceptions of satisfaction with telephone nursing.Methods:The design was nonexperimental and descriptive, with an inductive approach. Data were collected using open-ended questions in a questionnaire that was dispatched to 500 randomly selected callers to the Swedish Healthcare Direct in Northern Sweden.Results:Patients' satisfaction with telephone nursing was related to calm, clarity, and competence. Calm referred to the nurse remaining calm and composed during the call. Clarity was described as distinct, concrete, and practical advice on how to act, what to observe, and where to seek further assistance. Competence referred to both health care knowledge and caring skills.Conclusion:These aspects of nursing are dependent on each other and on-call telephone nursing services, which value patient satisfaction need to target all 3.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2019
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75661 (URN)10.1097/NCQ.0000000000000392 (DOI)2-s2.0-85069050862 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-08-27
Strömbäck, U., Engström, Å. & Wälivaara, B.-M. (2019). Realising the seriousness – the experience of suffering a second myocardial infarction: A qualitative study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 51, 1-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Realising the seriousness – the experience of suffering a second myocardial infarction: A qualitative study
2019 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 51, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

The aim of this study was to describe people’s experiences of suffering a second myocardial infarction.

Research methodology

A descriptive qualitative design. Interviews were conducted with eight persons afflicted by two myocardial infarctions. Data were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

Findings

The analysis resulted in one theme and four categories. The theme was ‘Realising the seriousness’ and the categories were: 1) Knowledge from previous experience; 2) A wake-up call for lifestyle changes; 3) The future becomes unpredictable; 4) Trying to find balance in life. The participant’s previous experience contributed to a better understanding of the symptoms of myocardial infarction and how to act when suffering a second myocardial infarction. After their second myocardial infarction, the participants became really aware of the need to implement a healthier lifestyle, as doing so might avoid a third myocardial infarction. The risk of suffering or even dying due to yet another myocardial infarction felt more tangible after their second one.

Conclusion

A second myocardial infarction is a different event in comparison to the first one, which makes afflicted people realise the seriousness and importance of making life style changes. They are more affected both physically and psychologically.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Common sense model, Experience, Qualitative content analysis, Second myocardial infarction
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71445 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2018.12.002 (DOI)30579827 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058654313 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-03-12 (inah)

Available from: 2018-11-05 Created: 2018-11-05 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Melander, C., Sävenstedt, S., Olsson, M. & Välivaara, B.-M. (2018). Assessing BPSD with the support of the NPI-NH: a discourse analysis of clinical reasoning. International psychogeriatrics, 30(4), 581-589
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing BPSD with the support of the NPI-NH: a discourse analysis of clinical reasoning
2018 (English)In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 581-589Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability of nursing staff to assess and evaluate behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) to determine when intervention is needed is essential. In order to assist with the assessment process, the current use of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Nursing Home version (NPI-NH) is internationally accepted. Even though the NPI-NH is thoroughly validated and has several advantages, there are also various challenges when implementing this system in practice. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore clinical reasoning employed by assistant nurses when utilizing the NPI-NH as a tool to assess frequency and severity of BPSD in individuals with advanced dementia.

Twenty structured assessment sessions in which assistant nurses used the NPI-NH were audio recorded and analyzed with a discourse analysis focusing on the activities in the communication.

Four categories were identified to convey assistant nurses' clinical reasoning when assessing and evaluating BPSD using the NPI-NH: considering deteriorations in ability and awareness, incorporating individual and contextual factors, overcoming variations in behaviors and ambiguous formulations in the instrument, and sense-making interactions with colleagues.

The NPI-NH served as a supportive frame and structure for the clinical reasoning performed during the assessment. The clinical reasoning employed by assistant nurses became a way to reach a consensual and broader understanding of the individual with dementia, with the support of NPI-NH as an important framework.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65964 (URN)10.1017/S1041610217002009 (DOI)000431404300014 ()28965503 (PubMedID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-05-17 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-10-04 Created: 2017-10-04 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Engström, Å., Rogmalm, K., Marklund, L. & Wälivaara, B.-M. (2018). Follow-up visit in an ICU: receiving a sense of coherence (ed.). Nursing in Critical Care, 23(6), 308-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Follow-up visit in an ICU: receiving a sense of coherence
2018 (English)In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 308-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimTo describe patients' experiences of a follow-up visit to an intensive care unit (ICU) after being critically ill and nursed there.BackgroundKnowledge about the follow-up visit needs to be developed, with the previously critically ill patient in focus.DesignQualitative descriptive.MethodSemi-structured interviews were conducted with nine patients and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The data collection occurred during spring 2014.FindingsDuring the follow-up visits in ICU, the relatives, the patient diary, and those who took part in the care contribute to fill memory gaps to create a picture and an explanation of the care period.ConclusionThe follow-up visit is an important tool in the patients' struggle to create a context and coherence from a missing or unreal time. The patient diary is essential to subsequently be able to relate to the period of care.Relevance to clinical practiceThe follow-up visit, together with a personal diary, after an ICU stay could be seen as significant for strengthening the patients' feeling of coherence and better health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6266 (URN)10.1111/nicc.12168 (DOI)000447157800006 ()25690677 (PubMedID)47780223-b8ed-45c0-b848-af3c920a3221 (Local ID)47780223-b8ed-45c0-b848-af3c920a3221 (Archive number)47780223-b8ed-45c0-b848-af3c920a3221 (OAI)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-10-16 (johcin)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-11-22Bibliographically approved
Melander, C., Sävenstedt, S., Välivaara, B.-M. & Olsson, M. (2018). Human capabilities in advanced dementia: Nussbaum's approach. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 13(2), Article ID 12178.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human capabilities in advanced dementia: Nussbaum's approach
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 12178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives

To explore how Martha Nussbaum's approach to human capabilities can apply to dignity in the lives of people with advanced dementia living in nursing homes.

Background

Challenges experienced when supporting people with advanced dementia who express problematic behaviours include understanding their needs and ensuring a dignified life for them.

Design and methods

Data were gathered using an ethnographic approach based on participatory observation. Nussbaum's capability approach was then used as a framework for the analysis. Four women diagnosed with advanced dementia who also expressed problematic behaviours were recruited from a nursing home in Northern Sweden. The data collection was performed during 2015.

Findings

Individuals with advanced dementia had difficulties in participating in the planning of their lives and achieving the human capability of practical reasoning. They were also at risk of being placed outside the social group, thus hindering them from attaining the human capability of affiliation. A dignified life for individuals with advanced dementia requires nursing staff to be present and to provide adapted support to ensure that the individual can actually pursue human capabilities.

Conclusion

Creating opportunities for the human capabilities of practical reasoning and affiliation is essential as they permeate all other human capabilities. For these individuals, it was crucial not only to create opportunities for human capabilities but also to attend to their expressions and needs and to guide and steer them towards a dignified life.

Implications for Practice

The normative structure of the capability approach described by Nussbaum can ensure that nursing staffs move beyond fulfilling patients’ basic needs to consider other capabilities vital for a dignified life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66049 (URN)10.1111/opn.12178 (DOI)000434118100002 ()28990351 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047906757 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-06-04 (svasva)

Available from: 2017-10-11 Created: 2017-10-11 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, S., Sävenstedt, S., Martinsson, J. & Välivaara, B.-M. (2018). Need for reassurance in self-care of minor illnesses. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(5-6), 1183-1191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Need for reassurance in self-care of minor illnesses
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 5-6, p. 1183-1191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

This study describes people's need for reassurance in self-care of minor illnesses.

BACKGROUND:

Self-care and active surveillance are advocated as important strategies to manage minor illnesses. Reassurance influences patient satisfaction and confidence in the practicing of self-care.

DESIGN:

This study is a descriptive and interpretive qualitative study.

METHODS:

Twelve persons with experience in self-care and receiving self-care advice were recruited, and data were collected using semi-structured interviews between September and December 2014. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analyses.

RESULTS:

Having previous experience and the ability to actively manage symptoms using self-care interventions was described as reassuring. Participants became stressed and concerned when the symptoms persisted and interventions lacked the desired effect, which often resulted in a decision to consult. Participants wanted to feel that the nurse was an actual person, who was sympathetic, present and understanding, when they received self-care advice. The nurse's assessment and reasoning of the symptoms facilitated care-seekers' assessments of risk, and clear and concrete advice on how to manage the symptoms exerted a calming effect. Patients needed to trust that the nurse understood their situation to embrace the advice, and being invited to return created a feeling that the nurse had listened and taken them seriously.

CONCLUSION:

Reassurance has the potential to allay doubts and fears to build confidence, which influences self-care and consultation behavior. Personal presence in the encounter, receiving an assessment and an explanation of the symptoms and precise advice are reassuring. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Nursing Probability Theory and Statistics
Research subject
Nursing; Matemathical Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66572 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14157 (DOI)000428419400078 ()29119676 (PubMedID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-04-10 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-11-13 Created: 2017-11-13 Last updated: 2018-04-27Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, A., Vikman, I., Välivaara, B.-M. & Engström, Å. (2018). Patterns of changes in patients' postoperative recovery from a short-term perspective (ed.). Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 33(2), 188-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of changes in patients' postoperative recovery from a short-term perspective
2018 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

To explore patterns of changes in patients' postoperative recovery over 1 month within different surgery groups.

Design

A quantitative longitudinal survey design was used.

Methods

A standardized questionnaire was used (N = 167 patients); the postoperative recovery profile for self-assessment of recovery. The postoperative recovery profile developed for hospitalized patients contains 17 items distributed over five dimensions: physical symptoms, physical function, psychological function, social function, and activity.

Findings

Overall, orthopaedic patients perceived a lower recovery than general surgery patients. All major surgery groups and subgroups except for joint replacement patients indicated significant systematic changes toward lower levels of problems. The orthopaedic patients assessed their psychological functioning as impaired, and the gastric bypass group was the most recovered.

Conclusions

The patients' expectations should be charted initially, and patients should be given realistic information to achieve a realistic hope for a good life in the future. A patient's recovery trajectory may not start after the surgery is completed. Rather, it has already commenced before surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
recovery, changes, patterns, orthopaedic, general surgery, acute, elective
National Category
Nursing Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6209 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2016.03.015 (DOI)000429206400011 ()2-s2.0-85016440739 (Scopus ID)467eea8e-597d-4be8-ba67-c88956f488e9 (Local ID)467eea8e-597d-4be8-ba67-c88956f488e9 (Archive number)467eea8e-597d-4be8-ba67-c88956f488e9 (OAI)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-04-06 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-04-26Bibliographically approved
Melander, C., Kikhia, B., Olsson, M., Wälivaara, B.-M. & Sävenstedt, S. (2018). The impact of using measurements of electrodermal activity in the assessment of problematic behaviour in dementia. Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, 8(3), 333-347
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of using measurements of electrodermal activity in the assessment of problematic behaviour in dementia
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, E-ISSN 1664-5464, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 333-347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A major and complex challenge when trying to support individuals with dementia is meeting the needs of those who experience changes in behaviour and mood. Aim: To explore how a sensor measuring electrodermal activity (EDA) impacts assistant nurses' structured assessments of problematic behaviours amongst people with dementia and their choices of care interventions. Methods: Fourteen individuals with dementia wore a sensor that measured EDA. The information from the sensor was presented to assistant nurses during structured assessments of problematic behaviours. The evaluation process included scorings with the instrument NPI-NH (Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home version), the care interventions suggested by assistant nurses to decrease problematic behaviours, and the assistant nurses' experiences obtained by focus group interviews. Results: The information from the sensor measuring EDA was perceived to make behavioural patterns more visual and clear, which enhanced assistant nurses' understanding of time-related patterns of behaviours. In turn, this enhancement facilitated timely care interventions to prevent the patterns and decrease the levels of problematic behaviour. Conclusion: With the addition of information from the sensor, nursing staff could target causes and triggers in a better way, making care interventions more specific and directed towards certain times throughout the day to prevent patterns of problematic behaviours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: S. Karger, 2018
National Category
Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70846 (URN)10.1159/000493339 (DOI)000465207700004 ()30386370 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054876403 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-11-07 (johcin) 

Available from: 2018-09-12 Created: 2018-09-12 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, A., Vikman, I., Välivaara, B.-M. & Engström, Å. (2017). Patients' perceptions of quality of care during the perioperative procedure. ACORN: The Journal of Perioperative Nursing in Australia, 30(3), 13-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' perceptions of quality of care during the perioperative procedure
2017 (English)In: ACORN: The Journal of Perioperative Nursing in Australia, ISSN 1448-7535, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe patients' perceptions of quality of care during the perioperative period and to identify areas for quality improvement. Design: A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used. Method: The data was collected (N=170) using a questionnaire for perioperative care. The methods were descriptive statistics, reported as percentages, and a manifest content analysis of the free text. Finding: The areas identified for improvement were information and participation. The participants lacked knowledge, preferred to hand over decision making to the hospital staff, and indicated that having personalised information about the surgery and perioperative period was important. However, too detailed information before surgery could cause increased anxiety. Conclusions: This study indicates that participation and information needs in perioperative settings seem to be situation specific. In addition, these needs seem to be personal and surgery specific. Further studies are required to clarify the differences in the satisfaction and quality of care between groups of patients in the perioperative context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Australian College of Perioperative Nurses, 2017
National Category
Nursing Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65770 (URN)10.26550/303/13.22 (DOI)2-s2.0-85030831854 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-22 Created: 2017-09-22 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, S., Martinsson, J., Välivaara, B.-M., Vikman, I. & Sävenstedt, S. (2016). Influence of self-care advice on patient satisfaction and healthcare utilization (ed.). Journal of Advanced Nursing, 72(8), 1789-1799
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of self-care advice on patient satisfaction and healthcare utilization
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 1789-1799Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThe aim of this study is to explore the influence of nurse-led self-care advice on healthcare utilization and patients' satisfaction with telephone nursing.BackgroundMany consultations in high-cost settings are for conditions that are manageable through self-care and callers with greater satisfaction with the nurse interaction are nearly four times more likely to engage in self-care.DesignCross-sectional study.MethodsQuestionnaires were sent out to 500 randomly selected callers to the Swedish Healthcare Direct in Northern Sweden during March 2014. Callers were asked about their satisfaction with the consultation, their intended actions prior to consultation, the recommendation given by the nurse and the action undertaken after the call.ResultsYoung callers and persons recommended watchful waiting or recurrence if no improvements were significantly less satisfied with their care. When calling on their own behalf, both men and women rated the severity of their symptoms equally and were advised to self-care to the same extent. Self-care advice had a constricting influence on self-reported healthcare utilization, with 66·1% of cases resulting in a lower level of care than first intended. Feeling reassured after the call was the aspect of nursing care that influenced satisfaction the most.ConclusionReceiving self-care advice rather than referral to a general practitioner influences patient satisfaction negatively. Feeling reassured after consultation is strongly related to satisfaction, which in turn has been found to increase the likelihood of engaging in self-care behaviour.

National Category
Nursing Probability Theory and Statistics Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Matemathical Statistics; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7453 (URN)10.1111/jan.12950 (DOI)000379932000007 ()27001441 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028243147 (Scopus ID)5d53ffb8-d712-4795-bf3f-07728a299db7 (Local ID)5d53ffb8-d712-4795-bf3f-07728a299db7 (Archive number)5d53ffb8-d712-4795-bf3f-07728a299db7 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20160323 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3400-323x

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