Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Lundberg, Angela
Publications (10 of 98) Show all publications
Lundberg, A., Ala-Aho, P., Eklo, O.-M., Kløve, B., Kværner, J. & Stumpp, C. (2016). Snow and frost: implications for spatiotemporal infiltration patterns - a review (ed.). Paper presented at . Hydrological Processes, 30(8), 1230-1250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Snow and frost: implications for spatiotemporal infiltration patterns - a review
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1230-1250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Vast regions of the northern hemisphere are exposed to snowfall and seasonal frost. This has large effects on spatiotemporal distribution of infiltration and groundwater recharge processes as well as on the fate of pollutants. Therefore, snow and frost need to be central inherent elements of risk assessment and management schemes. However, snow and frost are often neglected or treated summarily or in a simplistic way by groundwater modellers. Snow deposition is uneven, and the snow is likely to sublimate, be redistributed and partly melt during the winter influencing the mass and spatial distribution of snow storage available for infiltration, the presence of ice layers within and under the snowpack and, therefore, also the spatial distribution of depths and permeability of the soil frost. In steep terrain, snowmelt may travel downhill tens of metres in hours along snow layers. The permeability of frozen soil is mainly influenced by soil type, its water and organic matter content, and the timing of the first snow in relation to the timing of sub-zero temperatures. The aim with this paper is to review the literature on snow and frost processes, modelling approaches with the purpose to visualize and emphasize the need to include these processes when modelling, managing and predicting groundwater recharge for areas exposed to seasonal snow and frost

National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14137 (URN)10.1002/hyp.10703 (DOI)000373959500006 ()2-s2.0-84947976376 (Scopus ID)d795eba8-afbf-4237-8041-50a520326748 (Local ID)d795eba8-afbf-4237-8041-50a520326748 (Archive number)d795eba8-afbf-4237-8041-50a520326748 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20151201 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, A., Gustafsson, D., Stumpp, C., Kløve, B. & Feiccabrino, J. (2016). Spatiotemporal Variations in Snow and Soil Frost: A Review of Measurement Techniques. Hydrology, 3(3), Article ID 28.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatiotemporal Variations in Snow and Soil Frost: A Review of Measurement Techniques
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Hydrology, ISSN 2306-5338, Vol. 3, no 3, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Large parts of the northern hemisphere are covered by snow and seasonal frost. Climate warming is affecting spatiotemporal variations of snow and frost, hence influencing snowmelt infiltration, aquifer recharge and river runoff patterns. Measurement difficulties have hampered progress in properly assessing how variations in snow and frost impact snowmelt infiltration. This has led to contradicting findings. Some studies indicate that groundwater recharge response is scale dependent. It is thus important to measure snow and soil frost properties with temporal and spatial scales appropriate to improve infiltration process knowledge. The main aim with this paper is therefore to review ground based methods to measure snow properties (depth, density, water equivalent, wetness, and layering) and soil frost properties (depth, water and ice content, permeability, and distance to groundwater) and to make recommendations for process studies aiming to improve knowledge regarding infiltration in regions with seasonal frost. Ground-based radar (GBR) comes in many different combinations and can, depending on design, be used to assess both spatial and temporal variations in snow and frost so combinations of GBR and tracer techniques can be recommended and new promising methods (auocostics and self potential) are evolving, but the study design must be adapted to the scales, the aims and the resources of the study. View Full-Text

National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-60042 (URN)10.3390/hydrology3030028 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Feiccabrino, J., Graff, W., Lundberg, A., Sundström, N. & Gustafsson, D. (2015). Meteorological Knowledge Useful for the Improvement of Snow Rain Separation in Surface Based Models (ed.). Paper presented at . Hydrology, 2(4), 266-288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meteorological Knowledge Useful for the Improvement of Snow Rain Separation in Surface Based Models
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Hydrology, ISSN 2306-5338, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 266-288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An accurate precipitation phase determination—i.e., solid versus liquid—is of paramount importance in a number of hydrological, ecological, safety and climatic applications. Precipitation phase can be determined by hydrological, meteorological or combined approaches. Meteorological approaches require atmospheric data that is not often utilized in the primarily surface based hydrological or ecological models. Many surface based models assign precipitation phase from surface temperature dependent snow fractions, which assume that atmospheric conditions acting on hydrometeors falling through the lower atmosphere are invariant. This ignores differences in phase change probability caused by air mass boundaries which can introduce a warm air layer over cold air leading to more atmospheric melt energy than expected for a given surface temperature, differences in snow grain-size or precipitation rate which increases the magnitude of latent heat exchange between the hydrometers and atmosphere required to melt the snow resulting in snow at warmer temperatures, or earth surface properties near a surface observation point heating or cooling a shallow layer of air allowing rain at cooler temperatures or snow at warmer temperatures. These and other conditions can be observed or inferred from surface observations, and should therefore be used to improve precipitation phase determination in surface models.

National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8054 (URN)10.3390/hydrology2040266 (DOI)67eff2de-28be-4745-86dc-772d81f5e82b (Local ID)67eff2de-28be-4745-86dc-772d81f5e82b (Archive number)67eff2de-28be-4745-86dc-772d81f5e82b (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2015; 20151201 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Siergieiev, D., Ehlert, L., Reimann, T., Lundberg, A. & Liedl, R. (2015). Modelling hyporheic processes for regulated rivers under transient hydrological and hydrogeological conditions (ed.). Paper presented at . Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 19(1), 329-340
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling hyporheic processes for regulated rivers under transient hydrological and hydrogeological conditions
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 329-340Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the effects of major hydrogeological controls on hyporheic exchange and bank storage is essential for river water management, groundwater abstraction, restoration and ecosystem sustainability. Analytical models cannot adequately represent complex settings with, for example, transient boundary conditions, varying geometry of surface water-groundwater interface, unsaturated and overland flow, etc. To understand the influence of parameters such as (1) sloping river banks, (2) varying hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed and (3) different river discharge wave scenarios on hyporheic exchange characteristics such as (a) bank storage, (b) return flows and (c) residence time, a 2-D hydrogeological conceptual model and, subsequently, an adequate numerical model were developed. The numerical model was calibrated against observations in the aquifer adjacent to the hydropower-regulated Lule River, northern Sweden, which has predominantly diurnal discharge fluctuations during summer and long-lasting discharge peaks during autumn and winter. Modelling results revealed that bank storage increased with river wave amplitude, wave duration and smaller slope of the river bank, while maximum exchange flux decreased with wave duration. When a homogeneous clogging layer covered the entire river-aquifer interface, hydraulic conductivity positively affected bank storage. The presence of a clogging layer with hydraulic conductivity < 0.001 m dg'1 significantly reduced the exchange flows and virtually eliminated bank storage. The bank storage return/fill time ratio was positively related to wave amplitude and the hydraulic conductivity of the interface and negatively to wave duration and bank slope. Discharge oscillations with short duration and small amplitude decreased bank storage and, therefore, the hyporheic exchange, which has implications for solute fluxes, redox conditions and the potential of riverbeds as fish-spawning locations. Based on these results, river regulation strategies can be improved by considering the effect of certain wave event configurations on hyporheic exchange to ensure harmonious hydrogeochemical functioning of the river-aquifer interfaces and related ecosystems.

National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14095 (URN)10.5194/hess-19-329-2015 (DOI)000348929800018 ()2-s2.0-84921326772 (Scopus ID)d69573d9-8fb1-4ad0-b5fa-04f4e978203b (Local ID)d69573d9-8fb1-4ad0-b5fa-04f4e978203b (Archive number)d69573d9-8fb1-4ad0-b5fa-04f4e978203b (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20150203 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Siergieiev, D., Widerlund, A., Ingri, J., Lundberg, A. & Öhlander, B. (2014). Flow regulation effects on the hydrogeochemistry of the hyporheic zone in boreal rivers (ed.). Paper presented at . Science of the Total Environment, 499, 424-436
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flow regulation effects on the hydrogeochemistry of the hyporheic zone in boreal rivers
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 499, p. 424-436Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

River-aquifer interfaces are essential for ecosystem functioning in terms of nutrient exchange and biological habitat, but are greatly threatened world-wide. This study examined geochemical aspects of river-aquifer interaction in one regulated and one unregulated boreal river in Northern Sweden to determine whether the geochemical functioning of the hyporheic zone is affected by hydrological alterations, e.g. regulated river discharge and river-aquifer connectivity. In the unregulated Kalix River, the hyporheic pore water was well-oxygenated with orthogonal fluxes (≈0.6-0.7 m d-1) and acted as a sink for Fe, Mn, Al, NH4, and Ca, with fractional losses of 95%, 92%, 45%, 31%, and 15%, respectively. A corresponding elevation in the concentrations of these elements in the hyporheic sediment was observed, with higher saturation indices of Fe-, Mn-, and Al-bearing secondary minerals in hyporheic waters. In the regulated Lule River, hydraulic connectivity at the river-aquifer interface was altered by the presence of a clogging layer (0.04 m d–1). In addition, the river discharge oscillated daily, severely reducing exchange flows across the riverbed (<0.01 m d-1). As a result, the hyporheic pore water was suboxic, with elevated concentrations of filtered Fe and Mn (fractional increase of ≈3700% and ≈2500%, respectively) and other solutes (NH4, Si, S, Ca). A conceptual model revealed functional differences between geochemical features of the hyporheic zone of regulated and unregulated rivers. Overall, the results showed that hyporheic processes are altered along regulated rivers, with resulting impacts on the geochemistry of riverine, riparian and related marine ecosystems.

National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11343 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.06.112 (DOI)000343613200045 ()25022722 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84921724312 (Scopus ID)a4aafd39-c324-465e-9b6d-7e25ce8a3dfc (Local ID)a4aafd39-c324-465e-9b6d-7e25ce8a3dfc (Archive number)a4aafd39-c324-465e-9b6d-7e25ce8a3dfc (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140701 (dmysie)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Siergieiev, D., Lundberg, A. & Widerlund, A. (2014). Hyporheic water exchange in a large hydropower regulated boreal river: directions and rates (ed.). Paper presented at . Hydrology Research, 45(3), 334-348
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyporheic water exchange in a large hydropower regulated boreal river: directions and rates
2014 (English)In: Hydrology Research, ISSN 1998-9563, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 334-348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Widespread river regulation is known to modify river-aquifer interactions, influencing entire watersheds, but knowledge of the hyporheic flowpath along regulated rivers is limited. This study measured the hydraulic conductivity of the river bed and the aquifer, water levels and seepage fluxes in the heavily regulated Lule River in Northern Sweden, with the aim of characterising water exchange across the river-aquifer interface. While pristine rivers in the area are gaining, the Lule River was recharging the aquifer during 10% of the time. Daily river level fluctuations (typically ±0.25 m) directed ~3% of the total orthogonal flux across the river bed towards the aquifer, while during ~2% of the time the orthogonal fluxes were negligible (≤10–4 m d–1). A clogging layer on the river bed, most likely formed due to the modified river discharge, restricted river-aquifer exchange. The hyporheic zone had higher electrical conductivity than the river and the aquifer and electrical conductivity occasionally decreased following rising river water levels, with 3–5 hours delay. Overall, hydropower regulation has severely altered the hydrological regime of the hyporheic zone in the Lule River.

National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-13258 (URN)10.2166/nh.2013.011 (DOI)000338913600004 ()2-s2.0-84906216277 (Scopus ID)c73b5337-89c0-4af3-b7b5-2cb5cc78f1dd (Local ID)c73b5337-89c0-4af3-b7b5-2cb5cc78f1dd (Archive number)c73b5337-89c0-4af3-b7b5-2cb5cc78f1dd (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20130706 (dmysie)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Siergieiev, D., Widerlund, A., Lundberg, A., Drugge, L., Collomp, M., Ingri, J. & Öhlander, B. (2014). Impact of Hydropower Regulation on River Water Composition in Northern Sweden (ed.). Paper presented at . Aquatic geochemistry, 20(1), 59-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of Hydropower Regulation on River Water Composition in Northern Sweden
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Aquatic geochemistry, ISSN 1380-6165, E-ISSN 1573-1421, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 59-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using hydrogeochemical analysis of two large boreal rivers (pristine Kalix and hydropower regulated Lule) discharging into the Gulf of Bothnia, the major impacts of regulation on water discharge, element transport, and their seasonal redistribution have been assessed. The pre-regulation hydrogeochemical features were assumed to be similar for the two rivers. For the Lule River, the average maximum runoff was almost halved, while the average minimum was tripled as a result of the regulation. The fraction of winter transport of total organic carbon (TOC), Fe, Si, suspended Mn and P in the Lule River was, according to a conservative estimate, two to three times higher than in the pristine river. Longer residence time in the Lule River delayed arrival of the suspended Mn peak and dissolved Si decline to the river mouth. During summer, the suspended C/N ratio in the regulated river was 10-20 compared to <10 for the pristine, suggesting presence of predominantly old organic material. This was supported by a virtually constant suspended P/Fe ratio throughout the year in the Lule River, indicating low abundance of phytoplankton. TOC varied irregularly in the Lule River suggesting temporal disconnection between the river and the upper riparian zone. The disappearance of the spring flow maximum, a shift of element transport from spring to winter, and supply of mainly old organic material during the vegetation growth season may have a pronounced impact on the ecosystem of the Gulf of Bothnia and the river itself.

National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6401 (URN)10.1007/s10498-013-9215-6 (DOI)000330974700004 ()2-s2.0-84893752154 (Scopus ID)4a0ccc97-fce7-45d3-b568-98f31d8af904 (Local ID)4a0ccc97-fce7-45d3-b568-98f31d8af904 (Archive number)4a0ccc97-fce7-45d3-b568-98f31d8af904 (OAI)
Projects
Groundwater and Dependent Ecosystems: New Scientific and Technological Basis for Assessing Climate Change and Land-use Impacts on Groundwater
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20131031 (dmysie)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, A., Feiccabrino, J., Westerlund, C. & Al-Ansari, N. (2014). Urban snow deposits versus snow cooling plants in northern Sweden: A quantitative analysis of snow melt pollutant releases (ed.). Paper presented at . Water quality research journal of Canada, 49(1), 32-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban snow deposits versus snow cooling plants in northern Sweden: A quantitative analysis of snow melt pollutant releases
2014 (English)In: Water quality research journal of Canada, ISSN 1201-3080, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 32-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High-velocity runoff from snow deposit transports suspended grain-attached contaminants while underground snow storages trapped these contaminants within the storage. The aim here is to quantify pollutant masses from an urban snow deposit and to investigate the conditions when pollutant control was increased by turning a snow deposit into a snow cooling plant with permeable underground snow storage. Pollutant masses in an urban snow deposit in northern Sweden were: Cu = 67, Pb = 17, Zn = 160, P = 170, SS = 620, 000, Cl = 1, 200, N = 380 kg. A theoretical analysis showed that the fraction of surface runoff from a surface deposit largely depends on the hydraulic conductivity (K, m s-1) of the soil. For a melt rate of 30 mm, day-1, surface runoff would be about 97% for a soil with K = 10-8, while nonexistent for K>10-6. Similar soil conductivities are needed to ensure that all snow melt could be transported as groundwater from an underground storage. The largest pollution-control advantage with underground snow storage compared to a surface deposit would thus be that piping and filters for operation of the plant could be used to filter surface snow melt runoff before rejection

National Category
Geochemistry Geotechnical Engineering
Research subject
Applied Geology; Soil Mechanics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12344 (URN)10.2166/wqrjc.2013.042 (DOI)000343524600006 ()2-s2.0-84894278506 (Scopus ID)b7801831-a554-46ce-a555-3ce3f899fa57 (Local ID)b7801831-a554-46ce-a555-3ce3f899fa57 (Archive number)b7801831-a554-46ce-a555-3ce3f899fa57 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140304 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Siergieiev, D., Lundberg, A., Widerlund, A. & Öhlander, B. (2013). “Clogging layer” at regulated river beds - implications for river-groundwater exchange (ed.). Paper presented at Grundvattendagarna 2013 : 16/10/2013 - 17/10/2013. Paper presented at Grundvattendagarna 2013 : 16/10/2013 - 17/10/2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Clogging layer” at regulated river beds - implications for river-groundwater exchange
2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Within the EU-project GENESIS (2013), aiming to provide scientific basis and technical guidance for the update of the EU Groundwater Directive, Luleå University of Technology is investigating possible effects of hydropower regulation on surface water (SW)- groundwater (GW) exchange. The study compares SW, GW and hyporheic processes for the unregulated Kalix River and the regulated Lule River. Hydropower has long been regarded a fairly green energy source but today negative effects have become obvious (Renöfält et al. 2010).The hyporheic zone (HZ) accommodates most of the SW-GW exchange of solutes just beneath and along a river, dampens heat fluxes, processes pollutants and is essential for ecosystems.The study observes SW and GW (in wells orthogonal to the river) at one site in each river. In these, hydrological (water level, hydraulic conductivity, tracer test) and geochemical (temperature, electrical conductivity, water/soil chemistry) measurements were performed during several seasons.The presence of natural high-flow events in the Kalix River removes fines from the river bed, maintaining good SW-GW connectivity that favours hyporheic exchange (Brunke and Gonser 1997). Altered discharge of the regulated river (reduced flow peaks and velocity, daily discharge fluctuations) facilitated deposition of fine sediments at the river bed forming a “clogging layer” (Blaschke et al. 2003). The bed in the regulated river has two orders of magnitude lower hydraulic conductivity than that at the unregulated site and restricts the SW-GW exchange.Reduced hydraulic connectivity between SW and GW at the regulated Lule River site suggests decreased fluxes across the river-aquifer interface (Siergieiev et al. 2013), and thus reduced size of the HZ which is not always the case in regulated rivers (Sawyer et al. 2009).Decreased hyporheic velocities led to increased residence time and favored prolonged contact between water and soil matrix that stimulated biogeochemical transformations. As a result, the electrical conductivity of hyporheic water of the Lule River was higher than that of the surrounding water.Deteriorated connectivity and extended travel time reduced the dissolved oxygen concentration, which is functionally ecologically essential for hyporheic habitat. In addition, complete consumption of nitrate found at the regulated site, suggests formation of a suboxic zone extending several meters inland which promotes metals release reflected in high dissolved Fe and Mn in the HZ. The conditions of SW-GW exchange control nutrients processing and their export to SW. Thus, the HZ in the Lule River acts as a source of dissolved metals, while in the Kalix River much of the metals are removed by hyporheic processes due to good SW-GW connectivity.SW-GW connectivity plays an important role for hyporheic exchange and hyporheic water quality. Hydropower regulation in the Lule River has altered this connectivity, which may have far reaching implications for biogeochemical processes in the river.

National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-32140 (URN)686be115-bd1a-44be-be42-d1425362f62c (Local ID)686be115-bd1a-44be-be42-d1425362f62c (Archive number)686be115-bd1a-44be-be42-d1425362f62c (OAI)
Conference
Grundvattendagarna 2013 : 16/10/2013 - 17/10/2013
Note
Godkänd; 2013; 20131024 (dmysie)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Sundström, N., Lundberg, A., Gustafsson, D. & Kruglyak, A. (2013). Field evaluation of a new method for estimation of liquid water content and snow water equivalent of wet snowpacks with GPR (ed.). Paper presented at . Hydrology Research, 44(4), 600-613
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Field evaluation of a new method for estimation of liquid water content and snow water equivalent of wet snowpacks with GPR
2013 (English)In: Hydrology Research, ISSN 1998-9563, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 600-613Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Estimates of snow water equivalent (SWE) with ground-penetrating radar can be used to calibrate and validate measurements of SWE over large areas conducted from satellites and aircrafts. However, such radar estimates typically suffer from low accuracy in wet snowpacks due to a built-in assumption of dry snow. To remedy the problem, we suggest determining liquid water content from path-dependent attenuation. We present the results of a field evaluation of this method which demonstrate that, in a wet snowpack between 0.9 and 3 m deep and with about 5 vol% of liquid water, liquid water content is underestimated by about 50% (on average). Nevertheless, the method decreases the mean error in SWE estimates to 16% compared to 34% when the presence of liquid water in snow is ignored and 31% when SWE is determined directly from two-way travel time and calibrated for manually measured snow density.

National Category
Geochemistry Embedded Systems
Research subject
Applied Geology; Embedded System
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-2580 (URN)10.2166/nh.2012.182 (DOI)000321953200003 ()2-s2.0-84884479665 (Scopus ID)0367e137-8ef8-4514-abe9-6d4a2c275393 (Local ID)0367e137-8ef8-4514-abe9-6d4a2c275393 (Archive number)0367e137-8ef8-4514-abe9-6d4a2c275393 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20120919 (nilgra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications