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Olsson, Malin
Publications (10 of 44) Show all publications
Melander, C., Sävenstedt, S., Olsson, M. & Välivaara, B.-M. (2018). Assessing BPSD with the support of the NPI-NH: a discourse analysis of clinical reasoning. International psychogeriatrics, 30(4), 581-589
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing BPSD with the support of the NPI-NH: a discourse analysis of clinical reasoning
2018 (English)In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 581-589Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability of nursing staff to assess and evaluate behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) to determine when intervention is needed is essential. In order to assist with the assessment process, the current use of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Nursing Home version (NPI-NH) is internationally accepted. Even though the NPI-NH is thoroughly validated and has several advantages, there are also various challenges when implementing this system in practice. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore clinical reasoning employed by assistant nurses when utilizing the NPI-NH as a tool to assess frequency and severity of BPSD in individuals with advanced dementia.

Twenty structured assessment sessions in which assistant nurses used the NPI-NH were audio recorded and analyzed with a discourse analysis focusing on the activities in the communication.

Four categories were identified to convey assistant nurses' clinical reasoning when assessing and evaluating BPSD using the NPI-NH: considering deteriorations in ability and awareness, incorporating individual and contextual factors, overcoming variations in behaviors and ambiguous formulations in the instrument, and sense-making interactions with colleagues.

The NPI-NH served as a supportive frame and structure for the clinical reasoning performed during the assessment. The clinical reasoning employed by assistant nurses became a way to reach a consensual and broader understanding of the individual with dementia, with the support of NPI-NH as an important framework.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65964 (URN)10.1017/S1041610217002009 (DOI)000431404300014 ()28965503 (PubMedID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-05-17 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-10-04 Created: 2017-10-04 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Melander, C., Sävenstedt, S., Välivaara, B.-M. & Olsson, M. (2018). Human capabilities in advanced dementia: Nussbaum's approach. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 13(2), Article ID 12178.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human capabilities in advanced dementia: Nussbaum's approach
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 12178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives

To explore how Martha Nussbaum's approach to human capabilities can apply to dignity in the lives of people with advanced dementia living in nursing homes.

Background

Challenges experienced when supporting people with advanced dementia who express problematic behaviours include understanding their needs and ensuring a dignified life for them.

Design and methods

Data were gathered using an ethnographic approach based on participatory observation. Nussbaum's capability approach was then used as a framework for the analysis. Four women diagnosed with advanced dementia who also expressed problematic behaviours were recruited from a nursing home in Northern Sweden. The data collection was performed during 2015.

Findings

Individuals with advanced dementia had difficulties in participating in the planning of their lives and achieving the human capability of practical reasoning. They were also at risk of being placed outside the social group, thus hindering them from attaining the human capability of affiliation. A dignified life for individuals with advanced dementia requires nursing staff to be present and to provide adapted support to ensure that the individual can actually pursue human capabilities.

Conclusion

Creating opportunities for the human capabilities of practical reasoning and affiliation is essential as they permeate all other human capabilities. For these individuals, it was crucial not only to create opportunities for human capabilities but also to attend to their expressions and needs and to guide and steer them towards a dignified life.

Implications for Practice

The normative structure of the capability approach described by Nussbaum can ensure that nursing staffs move beyond fulfilling patients’ basic needs to consider other capabilities vital for a dignified life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66049 (URN)10.1111/opn.12178 (DOI)000434118100002 ()28990351 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047906757 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-06-04 (svasva)

Available from: 2017-10-11 Created: 2017-10-11 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, Å., Lindberg, B., Söderberg, S. & Olsson, M. (2018). Meanings of participation in hospital care: as narrated by patients. European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, 6(3), 431-437
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meanings of participation in hospital care: as narrated by patients
2018 (English)In: European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, ISSN 2052-5648, E-ISSN 2052-5656, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 431-437Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Patient participation is said to be an important factor for patients to experience satisfaction and quality with hospital care. Still, little is known about what participation actually means for patients in the specific context of hospital settings. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate meanings of participation as narrated by patients.

Method: Narrative interviews were conducted during the Autumn of 2013 until the Spring of 2014 and then phenomenological hermeneutically interpreted. In this study, we suggest that the phenomenon of participation in hospital care is experienced by the patient when being a co-creator and seen as an important person in a trustful context.

Results: The results illustrate that an experience of an open, cooperative and coherent environment invites and contributes to participate despite being in a vulnerable situation. The study highlights the importance of responding to each patient as a person, who sometimes has a need to participate actively and sometimes wants to hand over and assume the role of patient in the hospital care setting.

Discussion: Meanings of participation among patients in hospital care can be understood as a phenomenon experienced when being an involved co-creator and seen as an important person in a trustful context. In this study, as well as in previous research it is obvious that participation in hospital care concerns more than being involved in decision-making and receiving information.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The University of Buckingham Press Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Clinical communication, dignity, hospital care, lived experiences, narratives, nursing, patients, patient-clinician relationship, patient participation, patient satisfaction, person-centered healthcare, phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation, qualitative
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71036 (URN)10.5750/ejpch.v6i3.1521 (DOI)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 1;2018-10-03 (marisr)

Available from: 2018-09-30 Created: 2018-09-30 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
Melander, C., Kikhia, B., Olsson, M., Wälivaara, B.-M. & Sävenstedt, S. (2018). The impact of using measurements of electrodermal activity in the assessment of problematic behaviour in dementia. Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, 8(3), 333-347
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of using measurements of electrodermal activity in the assessment of problematic behaviour in dementia
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2018 (English)In: Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, E-ISSN 1664-5464, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 333-347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A major and complex challenge when trying to support individuals with dementia is meeting the needs of those who experience changes in behaviour and mood. Aim: To explore how a sensor measuring electrodermal activity (EDA) impacts assistant nurses' structured assessments of problematic behaviours amongst people with dementia and their choices of care interventions. Methods: Fourteen individuals with dementia wore a sensor that measured EDA. The information from the sensor was presented to assistant nurses during structured assessments of problematic behaviours. The evaluation process included scorings with the instrument NPI-NH (Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home version), the care interventions suggested by assistant nurses to decrease problematic behaviours, and the assistant nurses' experiences obtained by focus group interviews. Results: The information from the sensor measuring EDA was perceived to make behavioural patterns more visual and clear, which enhanced assistant nurses' understanding of time-related patterns of behaviours. In turn, this enhancement facilitated timely care interventions to prevent the patterns and decrease the levels of problematic behaviour. Conclusion: With the addition of information from the sensor, nursing staff could target causes and triggers in a better way, making care interventions more specific and directed towards certain times throughout the day to prevent patterns of problematic behaviours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: S. Karger, 2018
National Category
Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70846 (URN)10.1159/000493339 (DOI)30386370 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054876403 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-11-07 (johcin) 

Available from: 2018-09-12 Created: 2018-09-12 Last updated: 2018-11-07Bibliographically approved
Olsson, M. (2017). Att leva med långvarig neurologisk sjukdom: Självförståelse och förståelse. In: Dahlberg, K., & Ekman, I. (Ed.), Vägen till patientens värld och personcentrerad vård: (pp. 159-167). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att leva med långvarig neurologisk sjukdom: Självförståelse och förståelse
2017 (Swedish)In: Vägen till patientens värld och personcentrerad vård / [ed] Dahlberg, K., & Ekman, I., Stockholm: Liber, 2017, p. 159-167Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2017
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65278 (URN)9789147112715 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Zotterman, A. N., Skär, L., Olsson, M. & Söderberg, S. (2016). Being in Togetherness: Meanings of encounters within primary healthcare setting for patients living with long-term illness (ed.). Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25(19-20), 2854-2862
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being in Togetherness: Meanings of encounters within primary healthcare setting for patients living with long-term illness
2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 19-20, p. 2854-2862Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectivesThe aim of this study was to elucidate meanings of encounters for patients with long-term illness within the primary healthcare setting.BackgroundGood encounters can be crucial for patients in terms of how they view their quality of care. Therefore, it is important to understand meanings of interactions between patients and healthcare personnel.DesignA phenomenological hermeneutic method was used to analyse the interviews.MethodsNarrative interviews with ten patients with long-term illness were performed, with a focus on their encounters with healthcare personnel within the primary healthcare setting. A phenomenological hermeneutical approach was used to interpret the interview texts.ResultsThe results demonstrated that patients felt well when they were seen as an important person and felt welcomed by healthcare personnel. Information and follow-ups regarding the need for care were essential. Continuity with the healthcare personnel was one way to establish a relationship, which contributed to patients' feelings of being seen and understood. Good encounters were important for patients' feelings of health and well-being. Being met with mistrust, ignorance and nonchalance had negative effects on patients' perceived health and well-being and led to feelings of lower confidence regarding the care received.ConclusionsPatients described a great need to be confirmed and met with respect by healthcare personnel, which contributed to their sense of togetherness. Having a sense of togetherness strengthened patient well-being.Relevance to clinical practiceBy listening and responding to patients' needs and engaging in meetings with patients in a respectful manner, healthcare personnel can empower patients' feelings of health and well-being. Healthcare personnel need to be aware of the significance of these actions because they can make patients experience feelings of togetherness, even if patients meet with different care personnel at each visit.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12883 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13333 (DOI)000388921200014 ()27383692 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028236433 (Scopus ID)c08a4e83-f7bf-4229-b12f-a995dfb920c4 (Local ID)c08a4e83-f7bf-4229-b12f-a995dfb920c4 (Archive number)c08a4e83-f7bf-4229-b12f-a995dfb920c4 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 2016-11-01 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Gabrielsson, S., Sävenstedt, S. & Olsson, M. (2016). Taking personal responsibility: Nurses’ and assistant nurses’ experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care (ed.). International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 25(5), 434-443
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taking personal responsibility: Nurses’ and assistant nurses’ experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 434-443Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Therapeutic nurse–patient relationships are considered essential for good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care. Previous research suggests that inpatient care fails to fulfil patients' expectations in this regard, and that nurses might experience the reality of inpatient care as an obstruction. The aim of the present study was to explore nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in the specific context of psychiatric inpatient care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 skilled, relationship-oriented nurses and assistant nurses in order to explore their experiences with nursing practice related to psychiatric inpatient care. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using an interpretive descriptive approach. Findings describe good nursing practice as a matter of nurses and assistant nurses taking personal responsibility for their actions and for the individual patient as a person. Difficulties in providing dignified nursing care and taking personal responsibility cause them to experience feelings of distress and frustration. Shared values and nursing leadership supports being moral and treating patients with respect, having enough time supports being present and connecting with patients, and working as a part of a competent team with critical daily discussions and diversity supports being confident and building trust. The findings suggest that taking personal responsibility is integral to good nursing practice. If unable to improve poor circumstances, nurses might be forced to promote their own survival by refuting or redefining their responsibility. Nurses need to prioritize being with patients and gain support in shaping their own nursing practice. Nursing leadership should provide moral direction and defend humanistic values.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-15243 (URN)10.1111/inm.12230 (DOI)000384528800006 ()27378375 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988433370 (Scopus ID)ebdc8edc-4468-44db-85ab-815773e9228e (Local ID)ebdc8edc-4468-44db-85ab-815773e9228e (Archive number)ebdc8edc-4468-44db-85ab-815773e9228e (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 2016-10-07 (kribac)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Melander, C., Kikhia, B., Olsson, M., Välivaara, B.-M. & Sävenstedt, S. (2015). Assessment and evaluation of interventions in bpsd with the help of a multiple sensor system (ed.). Paper presented at Alzheimer's Association International Conference : 18/07/2015 - 23/07/2015. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 11(7), P164-P165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment and evaluation of interventions in bpsd with the help of a multiple sensor system
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2015 (English)In: Alzheimer's & Dementia, ISSN 1552-5260, E-ISSN 1552-5279, Vol. 11, no 7, p. P164-P165Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-35233 (URN)10.1016/j.jalz.2015.07.110 (DOI)9af13c7b-344c-4000-a62d-5bed6c2e853a (Local ID)9af13c7b-344c-4000-a62d-5bed6c2e853a (Archive number)9af13c7b-344c-4000-a62d-5bed6c2e853a (OAI)
Conference
Alzheimer's Association International Conference : 18/07/2015 - 23/07/2015
Note
Godkänd; 2015; 20151215 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Zotterman, A. N., Skär, L., Olsson, M. & Söderberg, S. (2015). District nurses' views on quality of primary healthcare encounters (ed.). Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 29(3), 418-425
Open this publication in new window or tab >>District nurses' views on quality of primary healthcare encounters
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 418-425Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Good encounters are fundamental for good and professional nursing care, and can be described as treating patients with respect and protecting their integrity and autonomy. This study describes district nurses' views on quality of healthcare encounters in primary healthcare. A purposive sample of 27 district nurses participated in five focus group interviews. The focus groups interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. The interview texts were analysed using a thematic content analysis. The analysis resulted in four themes, including being aware of the importance and difficulties during encounters, being the patient's advocate, being attentive to the unique person and being informed when a meeting turned out poorly. The results show that district nurses believed that encounters formed the basis of their work and it was vital for them to be aware of any difficulties. District nurses found that acting in a professional manner during encounters is the most significant factor, but this type of interaction was sometimes difficult because of stress and lack of time. The district nurses considered themselves to be the patients' advocate in the healthcare system; in addition, the acts of seeing, listening, believing and treating the patient seriously were important for providing good quality care. If a poor encounter occurred between the district nurse and the patient, the district nurses found that it was necessary to arrange a meeting to properly communicate what problems arose during the interaction. The district nurses highlighted that providing an apology and explanation could improve future encounters and establish a better nurse–patient relationship. In conclusion, this study shows the importance of confirming and respecting patients' dignity as the fundamental basis for a good quality encounter in primary healthcare

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8100 (URN)10.1111/scs.12146 (DOI)000359867700003 ()24806952 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84939448067 (Scopus ID)68d7d613-e308-4cec-8b74-1cb4ef84e6c2 (Local ID)68d7d613-e308-4cec-8b74-1cb4ef84e6c2 (Archive number)68d7d613-e308-4cec-8b74-1cb4ef84e6c2 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20140415 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Olsson, M. & Nilsson, C. (2015). Meanings of feeling well among women with Parkinson's disease (ed.). Paper presented at . International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 10, Article ID 28730.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meanings of feeling well among women with Parkinson's disease
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 28730Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We conducted a qualitative inquiry to describe the meanings of feeling well as experienced by women with Parkinson's disease. Nine women were interviewed and we analysed the interviews using a reflective lifeworld approach based on phenomenological epistemology. We present the analysis as five constituents: the body as unnoticed; being able to move on; feeling joy by being connected; finding peace and harmony; and being the director of one's own life. Our findings can be used to understand and promote well-being among women with Parkinson's disease. In care meetings, knowledge about the lived and experienced health processes supports the women's striving to not let illness dominate their experience of daily life.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7387 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v10.28730 (DOI)000363406300001 ()26489404 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84945940528 (Scopus ID)5c22ab19-9707-4bd7-8464-9201bc97b4ec (Local ID)5c22ab19-9707-4bd7-8464-9201bc97b4ec (Archive number)5c22ab19-9707-4bd7-8464-9201bc97b4ec (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20151008 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
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