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Kumpiene, J., Antelo, J., Brännvall, E., Carabante, I., Ek, K., Komárek, M., . . . Wårell, L. (2019). In situ chemical stabilization of trace element-contaminated soil: Field demonstrations and barriers to transition from laboratory to the field : A review. Applied Geochemistry, 100, 335-351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In situ chemical stabilization of trace element-contaminated soil: Field demonstrations and barriers to transition from laboratory to the field : A review
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2019 (English)In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 100, p. 335-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The chemical stabilization, or immobilization, of trace elements (metals and metalloids; TE) in contaminated soil has been studied for decades. A vast number of scientific publications are available on the method performance in laboratory settings, reporting that the application of various soil amendments to contaminated soil reduces TE mobility, bioavailability and toxicity. The most commonly used soil amendments include organic matter, iron oxides, phosphates, ashes, and lately biochar, alone or in combination with each other and/or lime. Most of the implemented field studies show a certain degree of improvement in soil and/or vegetation status following amendment. Regardless the positive performance of the technique in the laboratory, field validations and demonstrations remain scarce. The establishment of a field experiment often involves permits from authorities and agreements with site owners, both of which are considerably more time-consuming than laboratory tests. Due to conservative institutional structures, public authorities have been slow to adopt alternative remediation technologies, especially when the total TE concentration in soil remains the same and all of the associated risks are not yet convincingly described. For this reason, researchers should also focus on enhancing public knowledge of alternative remediation techniques so that future projects which aim to demonstrate the effectiveness of in situ immobilization techniques under natural conditions will be supported.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Soil remediation, Immobilization, Soil amendments, Leaching, Bioavailability
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering Economics
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology; Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72432 (URN)10.1016/j.apgeochem.2018.12.003 (DOI)000454459100032 ()2-s2.0-85058489499 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-01-04 (svasva)

Available from: 2019-01-03 Created: 2019-01-03 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Quintela-Sabarís, C., Marchand, L., Kidd, P. S., Friesl-Hanl, W., Puschenreiter, M., Kumpiene, J., . . . Mench, M. (2017). Assessing phytotoxicity of trace element-contaminated soils phytomanaged with gentle remediation options at ten European field trials. Science of the Total Environment, 599-600, 1388-1398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing phytotoxicity of trace element-contaminated soils phytomanaged with gentle remediation options at ten European field trials
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2017 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 599-600, p. 1388-1398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gentle remediation options (GRO), i.e. in situ stabilisation, (aided) phytoextraction and (aided) phytostabilisation, were implemented at ten European sites contaminated with trace elements (TE) from various anthropogenic sources: mining, atmospheric fallout, landfill leachates, wood preservatives, dredged-sediments, and dumped wastes. To assess the performance of the GRO options, topsoil was collected from each field trial, potted, and cultivated with lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) for 48 days. Shoot dry weight (DW) yield, photosynthesis efficiency and major element and TE concentrations in the soil pore water and lettuce shoots were measured.

GRO implementation had a limited effect on TE concentrations in the soil pore water, although use of multivariate Co-inertia Analysis revealed a clear amelioration effect in phytomanaged soils. Phytomanagement increased shoot DW yield at all industrial and mine sites, whereas in agricultural soils improvements were produced in one out of five sites. Photosynthesis efficiency was less sensitive than changes in shoot biomass and did not discriminate changes in soil conditions.

Based on lettuce shoot DW yield, compost amendment followed by phytoextraction yielded better results than phytostabilisation; moreover shoot ionome data proved that, depending on initial soil conditions, recurrent compost application may be required to maintain crop production with common shoot nutrient concentrations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63411 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.187 (DOI)000405253500035 ()28531917 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019170393 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-05-17 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Kumpiene, J., Giagnoni, L., Marschner, B., Denys, S., Mench, M., Andriaensen, K., . . . Renella, G. (2017). Assessment of Methods for Determining Bioavailability of Trace Elements in Soils: A Review. Pedosphere, 27(3), 389-406
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of Methods for Determining Bioavailability of Trace Elements in Soils: A Review
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2017 (English)In: Pedosphere, ISSN 1002-0160, E-ISSN 2210-5107, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 389-406Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trace element-contaminated soils (TECSs) are one of the consequences of the past industrial development worldwide. Excessive exposure to trace elements (TEs) represents a permanent threat to ecosystems and humans worldwide owing to the capacity of metal(loid)s to cross the cell membranes of living organisms and of human epithelia, and their interference with cell metabolism. Quantification of TE bioavailability in soils is complicated due to the polyphasic and reactive nature of soil constituents. To unravel critical factors controlling soil TE bioavailability and to quantify the ecological toxicity of TECSs, TEs are pivotal for evaluating excessive exposure or deficiencies and controlling the ecological risks. While current knowledge on TE bioavailability and related cumulative consequences is growing, the lack of an integrated use of this concept still hinders its utilization for a more holistic view of ecosystem vulnerability and risks for human health. Bioavailability is not generally included in models for decision making in the appraisal of TECS remediation options. In this review we describe the methods for determining the TE bioavailability and technological developments, gaps in current knowledge, and research needed to better understand how TE bioavailability can be controlled by sustainable TECS management altering key chemical properties, which would allow policy decisions for environmental protection and risk management

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-64039 (URN)10.1016/S1002-0160(17)60337-0 (DOI)000405059600002 ()2-s2.0-85020730579 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-06-15 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Bert, V., Neu, S., Zdanevitch, I., Friesl-Hanl, W., Collet, S., Gaucher, R., . . . Kumpiene, J. (2017). How to manage plant biomass originated from phytotechnologies?: Gathering perceptions from end-users. International journal of phytoremediation, 19(10), 947-954
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to manage plant biomass originated from phytotechnologies?: Gathering perceptions from end-users
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2017 (English)In: International journal of phytoremediation, ISSN 1522-6514, E-ISSN 1549-7879, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 947-954Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A questionnaire survey was carried out in 4 European countries to gather end-user's perceptions of using plants from phytotechnologies in combustion and anaerobic digestion (AD). 9 actors of the wood energy sector from France, Germany and Sweden, and 11 AD platform operators from France, Germany and Austria were interviewed. Questions related to installation, input materials, performed analyses, phytostabilization and phytoextraction. Although the majority of respondents did not know phytotechnologies, results suggested that plant biomass from phytomanaged areas could be used in AD and combustion, under certain conditions. As a potential advantage, these plants would not compete with plants grown on agricultural lands, contaminated lands being not suitable for agriculture production. Main limitations would be related to additional controls in process' inputs and end-products and installations that might generate additional costs. In most cases, price of phytotechnologies biomass was mentioned as a driver to potentially use plants from metal-contaminated soils. Plants used in phytostabilisation or phytoexclusion were thought to be less risky and, consequently, benefited from a better theoretical acceptance than those issued from phytoextraction. Results were discussed according to national regulations. One issue related to the regulatory gap concerning the status of the plant biomass produced on contaminated land.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62697 (URN)10.1080/15226514.2017.1303814 (DOI)000416503500011 ()28323452 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85029766779 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-09-22 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-03-27 Created: 2017-03-27 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Lidelöw, S., Macsik, J., Carabante, I. & Kumpiene, J. (2017). Leaching behaviour of copper slag, construction and demolition waste and crushed rock used in a full-scale road construction. Journal of Environmental Management, 204(1), 695-703
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leaching behaviour of copper slag, construction and demolition waste and crushed rock used in a full-scale road construction
2017 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 204, no 1, p. 695-703Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The leaching behaviour of a road construction with fayalitic copper slag, recycled concrete and crushed rock as sub-base materials was monitored over ten years. All studied materials used in the road construction, including crushed rock, contained concentrations of several elements exceeding the guideline values recommended by the Swedish EPA for total element concentrations for waste materials used in constructions. Despite that, leaching from the road construction under field conditions in general was relatively low. The leachates from the recycled materials contained higher concentrations of several constituents than the leachates from the reference section with crushed rock. The leaching of the elements of interest (Cr, Mo, Ni, Zn) reached peak concentrations during the second and fourth (Cu) years and decreased over the observation period to levels below the Swedish recommended values. Carbonation of the concrete aggregates caused a substantial but short-term increase in the leaching of oxyanions such as chromate. The environmental risks related to element leaching are highest at the beginning of the road life. Ageing of materials or pre-treatment through leaching is needed prior to their use in construction to avoid peak concentrations. Also, the design of road constructions should be adjusted so that recycled materials are covered with low-permeability covers, which would minimize the exposure to atmospheric precipitation and weathering.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Building Technologies Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Timber Structures; Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65880 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.09.032 (DOI)000413878300071 ()28963970 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030104861 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-09-29 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Touceda-Gonzalez, M., Prieto-Fernandez, A., Renella, G., Giagnoni, L., Sessitsch, A., Brader, G., . . . Kidd, P. S. (2017). Microbial community structure and activity in trace elementcontaminatedsoils phytomanaged by Gentle Remediation Options (GRO). Environmental Pollution, 231(1), 237-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial community structure and activity in trace elementcontaminatedsoils phytomanaged by Gentle Remediation Options (GRO)
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2017 (English)In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 231, no 1, p. 237-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gentle remediation options (GRO) are based on the combined use of plants, associated microorganisms and soil amendments, which can potentially restore soil functions and quality. We studied the effects of three GRO (aided-phytostabilisation, in situ stabilisation and phytoexclusion, and aided-phytoextraction) on the soil microbial biomass and respiration, the activities of hydrolase enzymes involved in the biogeochemical cycles of C, N, P, and S, and bacterial community structure of trace element contaminated soils (TECS) from six field trials across Europe. Community structure was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of Bacteria, α- and β-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Streptomycetaceae, and sequencing of DGGE bands characteristic of specific treatments. The number of copies of genes involved in ammonia oxidation and denitrification were determined by qPCR.

Phytomanagement increased soil microbial biomass at three sites and respiration at the Biogeco site (France). Enzyme activities were consistently higher in treated soils compared to untreated soils at the Biogeco site. At this site, microbial biomass increased from 696 to 2352 mg ATP kg−1 soil, respiration increased from 7.4 to 40.1 mg C-CO2 kg−1 soil d−1, and enzyme activities were 2–11-fold higher in treated soils compared to untreated soil. Phytomanagement induced shifts in the bacterial community structure at both, the total community and functional group levels, and generally increased the number of copies of genes involved in the N cycle (nirK, nirS, nosZ, and amoA). The influence of the main soil physico-chemical properties and trace element availability were assessed and eventual site-specific effects elucidated. Overall, our results demonstrate that phytomanagement of TECS influences soil biological activity in the long term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65156 (URN)10.1016/j.envpol.2017.07.097 (DOI)000414881000024 ()28802993 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85031023807 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-08-17 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-08-17 Created: 2017-08-17 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Kumpiene, J., Nordmark, D., Carabante, I., Sužiedelytė-Visockienė, J. & Česlovas Aksamitauskas, V. (2017). Remediation of soil contaminated with organic and inorganic wood impregnation chemicals by soil washing. Chemosphere, 184, 13-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Remediation of soil contaminated with organic and inorganic wood impregnation chemicals by soil washing
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2017 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 184, p. 13-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a large scale washing/wet sieving technique for a soil contaminated with wood impregnation chemicals by 1) defining the final distribution of trace elements (As, Cu, Cr, Zn) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in separated soil particle size fractions; and 2) defining the leaching behavior of the contaminants in these soil fractions. A soil washing experiment was implemented at waste management facility in Sweden using a full scale soil sorting and washing equipment. Five tons of soil was loaded to the equipment and wet-sieved into the following fractions: >16 mm, 8–16 mm, 2–8 mm, 0.2–2 mm, <0.2 mm and a fraction that floated on top of the slurry before the final separation phase, composed of organic matter (OM). Analysis of total concentrations of contaminants in all soil fractions indicated that wet sieving/soil washing was not efficient to reduce the total volume of soil that needs further treatment. Even the coarsest soil fractions (>8 mm) contained elevated concentrations of total As and PAH. Leaching of As from all washed soil fractions was so high, that none of the particle size fractions could be disposed of without additional treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63542 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.05.140 (DOI)000407525500002 ()28575800 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85020001717 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-06-02 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Kasiuliene, A., Paulauskas, V. A. & Kumpiene, J. (2016). Chelant-Assisted Accumulation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) Biomass as a Renewable Energy Feedstock (ed.). Polish Journal of Environmental Studies, 25(5), 1985-1993
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chelant-Assisted Accumulation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) Biomass as a Renewable Energy Feedstock
2016 (English)In: Polish Journal of Environmental Studies, ISSN 1230-1485, E-ISSN 2083-5906, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 1985-1993Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article discusses the environmental concerns regarding soil contamination by heavy metals and the possibility of growing a high biomass-yielding crop (i.e., rapeseed) as a tool of phytoremediation. The aim of our research was to investigate the growth parameters and the capacity of rapeseed to accumulate Cd, Cu, and Zn from the contaminated soil and to investigate the effects of the chelants (EDTA, EDDS) as potential heavy metal mobility-enhancing agents. A pot experiment was performed under greenhouse conditions where rapeseed was grown on heavy metal-contaminated soil taken from former septic drain fields. Chelants were applied twice using doses of 3 mmol kg(-1) of wet soil weight. Plants from contaminated soil produced more biomass and heavier seeds. The highest Cd concentrations were detected in rapeseed stems and leaves: Cu in roots and Zn in seeds and stems with leaves. Rapeseed in some cases exhibited translocation factor values for single plant parts greater than unity, whereas the bioconcentration factor was always below unity. Detected concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Zn in the biomass indicate that rapeseed may be considered an excluder rather than accumulator. Chelant application did not provide the expected enhancing effect on heavy metal uptake by rapeseed.

National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-5234 (URN)000385472400021 ()2-s2.0-8499274027 (Scopus ID)3475025d-74df-47d5-8824-b4ea0ebdb381 (Local ID)3475025d-74df-47d5-8824-b4ea0ebdb381 (Archive number)3475025d-74df-47d5-8824-b4ea0ebdb381 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 2016-11-14 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Kumpiene, J. & Niero, L. (2016). Contaminated soil for landfill covers: Risk mitigation by arsenic immobilization. In: Bhattacharya, Prosun; Vahter, Marie; Jarsjo, Jerker; Kumpiene, Jurate; Charlotte, Sparrenbom (Ed.), Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability: Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016. Paper presented at 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016, Stockholm, 19-23 June 2016 (pp. 579-580). London: CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contaminated soil for landfill covers: Risk mitigation by arsenic immobilization
2016 (English)In: Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability: Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 / [ed] Bhattacharya, Prosun; Vahter, Marie; Jarsjo, Jerker; Kumpiene, Jurate; Charlotte, Sparrenbom, London: CRC Press, 2016, p. 579-580Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to evaluate the risks of arsenic (As) spreading from soil that was used in a landfill cover. The As-contaminated soil was treated with iron, and a combination of iron and peat and placed in a pilot-scale landfill cover. The main exposure pathways concerning risks to human health and the environment were studied by analysing dissolved As in soil pore water, As phytotoxicity and bioaccessibility. The results showed that the stabilization of As-contaminated soil with a combination of Fe0and peat signifi-cantly reduced the As concentration in soil pore water, uptake by plants and improved the main morphological parameters of plants. The soil treatment also reduced the bioaccessibility As indicating the reduced risks to human health. Using Fe0amendment alone, the positive impact on the measured indicators was considerably smaller or not significant

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: CRC Press, 2016
Series
Arsenic in the environment., Proceedings
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63071 (URN)2-s2.0-85016965857 (Scopus ID)9781315629438 (ISBN)
Conference
6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016, Stockholm, 19-23 June 2016
Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Bhattacharya, P., Vahter, M. E., Jaresjö, J., Kumpiene, J., Ahmad, A., Sparrenbom, C. J., . . . Naidu, R. (2016). Editors’ foreword. In: Bhattacharya, Prosun; Vahter, Marie; Jarsjo, Jerker; Kumpiene, Jurate; Charlotte, Sparrenbom (Ed.), Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability: Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016. Paper presented at 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016, Stockholm, 19-23 June 2016 (pp. xlv-xlvi). London: CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editors’ foreword
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2016 (English)In: Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability: Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 / [ed] Bhattacharya, Prosun; Vahter, Marie; Jarsjo, Jerker; Kumpiene, Jurate; Charlotte, Sparrenbom, London: CRC Press, 2016, p. xlv-xlviConference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: CRC Press, 2016
Series
Arsenic in the environment., Proceedings
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63072 (URN)2-s2.0-85017018853 (Scopus ID)9781315629438 (ISBN)
Conference
6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016, Stockholm, 19-23 June 2016
Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1442-1573

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