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Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Kudahettige-Nilsson, R., Holmgren, M., Madavi, B., Nilsson, R. & Sellstedt, A. (2016). Adaptability of Trametes versicolor to the lignocellulosic inhibitors furfural, HMF, phenol and levulinic acid during ethanol fermentation (ed.). Biomass and Bioenergy, 90, 95-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptability of Trametes versicolor to the lignocellulosic inhibitors furfural, HMF, phenol and levulinic acid during ethanol fermentation
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2016 (English)In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 90, p. 95-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ligno-cellulosic biofuels, notably ethanol produced in processes involving biological fermentation, have high potential as renewable alternatives to fossil fuels. However, ligno-cellulose pretreatment procedures generate substances that inhibit current biocatalysts. Thus, efficient methods are required for improving these organisms' tolerance or developing new biocatalysts with higher tolerance to the inhibitors. For this, greater knowledge of the mechanisms involved is needed. Therefore, we examined effects of common inhibitors (phenol, levulinic acid, HMF (hydroxymethylfurfural) and furfural) on growth, utilization of sugars (xylose, mannose and glucose) and enzyme activities of a tolerant organism, the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor, during 15-day incubations. The fungus metabolized and grew in the presence of all the inhibitors (singly and together) at the applied concentration (0.2–0.6 g/L). When all inhibitors were added, no significant effect of sugar utilization was shown. However, levulinic acid added solely reduced xylose (but not xylose-degrading enzymes) and mannose utilization, but not glucose utilization. Physiological and biotechnological implications of the findings are discussed such as usage of T. versicolor as a detoxifying agent in ethanol production.

National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9788 (URN)10.1016/j.biombioe.2016.03.030 (DOI)000377740200012 ()2-s2.0-84962448771 (Scopus ID)877fa52f-3650-4d96-86a7-a9d222109758 (Local ID)877fa52f-3650-4d96-86a7-a9d222109758 (Archive number)877fa52f-3650-4d96-86a7-a9d222109758 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20160410 (robnil)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Lingman, P., Eriksson, T., Marklund, J., Lindström, C. & Nilsson, R. (2016). Gamifcation in web based dynamical simulations (ed.). Paper presented at Control Systems conference : 27/04/2016 - 28/04/2016. Paper presented at Control Systems conference : 27/04/2016 - 28/04/2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gamifcation in web based dynamical simulations
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-31207 (URN)5524c344-8476-438b-9664-15066d09bfdd (Local ID)5524c344-8476-438b-9664-15066d09bfdd (Archive number)5524c344-8476-438b-9664-15066d09bfdd (OAI)
Conference
Control Systems conference : 27/04/2016 - 28/04/2016
Note
Godkänd; 2016; 20160811 (robnil)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Kudahettige-Nilsson, R., Helmerius, J., Nilsson, R., Sjöblom, M., Hodge, D. & Rova, U. (2015). Biobutanol Production by Clostridium acetobutylicum Using Xylose Recovered from Birch Kraft Black Liquor (ed.). Paper presented at . Bioresource Technology, 176, 71-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biobutanol Production by Clostridium acetobutylicum Using Xylose Recovered from Birch Kraft Black Liquor
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2015 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 176, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation was studied using acid-hydrolyzed xylan recovered from hardwood Kraft black liquor by CO2 acidification as the only carbon source. Detoxification of hydrolyzate using activated carbon was conducted to evaluate the impact of inhibitor removal and fermentation. Xylose hydrolysis yields as high as 18.4% were demonstrated at the highest severity hydrolysis condition. Detoxification using active carbon was effective for removal of both phenolics (76-81%) and HMF (38-52%). Batch fermentation of the hydrolyzate and semi-defined P2 media resulted in a total solvent yield of 0.12-0.13 g/g and 0.34 g/g, corresponding to a butanol concentration of 1.8-2.1 g/L and 7.3 g/L respectively. This work is the first study of a process for the production of a biologically-derived biofuel from hemicelluloses solubilized during Kraft pulping and demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing xylan recovered directly from industrial Kraft pulping liquors as a feedstock for biological production of biofuels such as butanol.

National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4797 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2014.11.012 (DOI)000345982900010 ()25460986 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84911458413 (Scopus ID)2c895ab4-6af7-4339-905d-929fa257f811 (Local ID)2c895ab4-6af7-4339-905d-929fa257f811 (Archive number)2c895ab4-6af7-4339-905d-929fa257f811 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; Nivå 2; 20141114 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Bonturi, N., Matsakas, L., Nilsson, R., Christakopoulos, P., Miranda, E. A., Berglund, K. & Rova, U. (2015). Single Cell Oil Producing Yeasts Lipomyces starkeyi and Rhodosporidium toruloides: Selection of Extraction Strategies and Biodiesel Property Prediction (ed.). Paper presented at . Energies, 8(6), 5040-5052
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single Cell Oil Producing Yeasts Lipomyces starkeyi and Rhodosporidium toruloides: Selection of Extraction Strategies and Biodiesel Property Prediction
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2015 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 5040-5052Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Single cell oils (SCOs) are considered potential raw material for the production of biodiesel. Rhodosporidium sp. and Lipomyces sp. are good candidates for SCO production. Lipid extractability differs according to yeast species and literature on the most suitable method for each oleaginous yeast species is scarce. This work aimed to investigate the efficiency of the most cited strategies for extracting lipids from intact and pretreated cells of Rhodosporidium toruloides and Lipomyces starkeyi. Lipid extractions were conducted using hexane or combinations of chloroform and methanol. The Folch method resulted in the highest lipid yields for both yeasts (42% for R. toruloides and 48% for L. starkeyi). Also, this method eliminates the cell pretreatment step. The Bligh and Dyer method underestimated the lipid content in the tested strains (25% for R. toruloides and 34% for L. starkeyi). Lipid extractability increased after acid pretreatment for the Pedersen, hexane, and Bligh and Dyer methods. For R. toruloides unexpected fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) composition were found for some lipid extraction strategies tested. Therefore, this work provides useful information for analytical and process development aiming at biodiesel production from the SCO of these two yeast species.

National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3915 (URN)10.3390/en8065040 (DOI)000357489700020 ()2-s2.0-84933567980 (Scopus ID)1c41c552-648e-4799-baab-13687688f144 (Local ID)1c41c552-648e-4799-baab-13687688f144 (Archive number)1c41c552-648e-4799-baab-13687688f144 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20150528 (leomat)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, R., Bauer, F., Mesfun, S., Hulteberg, C., Lundgren, J., Wännström, S., . . . Berglund, K. (2014). Techno-economics of carbon preserving butanol production using a combined fermentative and catalytic approach (ed.). Paper presented at . Bioresource Technology, 161, 263-269
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Techno-economics of carbon preserving butanol production using a combined fermentative and catalytic approach
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2014 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 161, p. 263-269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a novel process for n-butanol production which combines a fermentation consuming carbon dioxide (succinic acid fermentation) with subsequent catalytic reduction steps to add hydrogen to form butanol. Process simulations in Aspen Plus have been the basis for the techno-economic analyses performed. The overall economy for the novel process cannot be justified, as production of succinic acid by fermentation is too costly. Though, succinic acid price is expected to drop drastically in a near future. By fully integrating the succinic acid fermentation with the catalytic conversion the need for costly recovery operations could be reduced. The hybrid process would need 22% less raw material than the butanol fermentation at a succinic acid fermentation yield of 0.7 g/g substrate. Additionally, a carbon dioxide fixation of up to 13 ktonnes could be achieved at a plant with an annual butanol production of 10 ktonnes

National Category
Bioprocess Technology Energy Engineering
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering; Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14267 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2014.03.055 (DOI)000335436000034 ()24717319 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84897933882 (Scopus ID)d9f200c0-23e2-4b12-95fe-cf7875940e6c (Local ID)d9f200c0-23e2-4b12-95fe-cf7875940e6c (Archive number)d9f200c0-23e2-4b12-95fe-cf7875940e6c (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140324 (robnil)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Bauer, F., Berglund, K., Hulteberg, C., Lundgren, J., Mesfun, S., Nilsson, R., . . . Wännström, S. (2013). Comparative system analysis of carbon preserving fermentations for biofuels production (ed.). Paper presented at . Göteborg: The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Renewable Transportation Fuels (f3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative system analysis of carbon preserving fermentations for biofuels production
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2013 (English)Report (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Renewable Transportation Fuels (f3), 2013. p. 40
Series
f3 report ; 2013:16
National Category
Energy Engineering Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Energy Engineering; Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-25267 (URN)e77db833-8e0d-4472-a978-e70e34003fef (Local ID)e77db833-8e0d-4472-a978-e70e34003fef (Archive number)e77db833-8e0d-4472-a978-e70e34003fef (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2013; 20141207 (senmes)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Srivastava, V., Obudulu, O., Löfstedt, T., Rydén, P., Nilsson, R., Ahnlund, M., . . . Wingsle, G. (2013). OnPLS integration of transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data shows multi-level oxidative stress responses in the cambium of transgenic hipI- superoxide dismutase Populus plants (ed.). Paper presented at . BMC Genomics, 14(893)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>OnPLS integration of transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data shows multi-level oxidative stress responses in the cambium of transgenic hipI- superoxide dismutase Populus plants
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2013 (English)In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 14, no 893Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10716 (URN)10.1186/1471-2164-14-893 (DOI)000329365900001 ()2-s2.0-84890282232 (Scopus ID)98eed323-08ff-4b8a-b914-7f59df024cb3 (Local ID)98eed323-08ff-4b8a-b914-7f59df024cb3 (Archive number)98eed323-08ff-4b8a-b914-7f59df024cb3 (OAI)
Note
Upprättat; 2013; 20131219 (robnil)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, R., Bollhöner, B., Wingsle, G. & Tuominen, H. (2011). Metacaspase Substrate Screening using Filter Aided Sample Preparation (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), HUPO-2011: 10th World Congress of the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO): Geneva, Switzerland, September 3rd-7th, 2011: Proceedings-Posters: .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metacaspase Substrate Screening using Filter Aided Sample Preparation
2011 (English)In: HUPO-2011: 10th World Congress of the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO): Geneva, Switzerland, September 3rd-7th, 2011: Proceedings-Posters, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background Metacaspases are proteases essential for programmed cell death (apoptosis) in plants, though most of their substrates remain unknown (1). The activity of metacaspases is a key issue in understanding wood (dead xylem cells) formation in trees. Here, we performed a substrate screening using a recombinant metacaspase that have an expression profile associated with the programmed cell death during wood formation in poplar. Methods Substrate preparation was initiated by total protein extraction from xylem tissue of plants down-regulated (RNA interference) in the expression of the metacaspase gene. Proper conditions intended for screening of the enzyme substrates were achieved by combinations of enzyme and substrate ultrafiltration. Utilizing the low pH activation of the enzyme allowed prompt activation and minute monitoring of newly formed peptides. Peptides were analysed by LC-MSMS using a nano-LC system coupled to a Synapt G2 mass spectrometer. Additional extractions including wild-type plants were performed to support detected substrate processing. Results The results revealed an enzyme active at low temperature (< 7 °C) with properties fitting criteria for cold-adapted enzymes. High specific activity was detected at low temperature and degradation products from the enzyme were formed after 30 min incubation at room temperature. Conclusions Our preliminary data suggest a substrate that has global responses that would clarify the metacaspase involvement in programmed cell death and wood formation. 1.Sundstrom, J. F., Vaculova, A., Smertenko, A. P., Savenkov, E. I., Golovko, A., Minina, E., Tiwari, B. S., Rodriguez-Nieto, S., Zamyatnin, A. A., Valineva, T., Saarikettu, J., Frilander, M. J., Suarez, M. F., Zavialov, A., Stahl, U., Hussey, P. J., Silvennoinen, O., Sundberg, E., Zhivotovsky, B., and Bozhkov, P. V. (2009) Tudor staphylococcal nuclease is an evolutionarily conserved component of the programmed cell death degradome. Nat. Cell Biol. 11, 1347-U198.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-32268 (URN)6b54379d-ffbd-490f-bef7-139aadb9afa1 (Local ID)6b54379d-ffbd-490f-bef7-139aadb9afa1 (Archive number)6b54379d-ffbd-490f-bef7-139aadb9afa1 (OAI)
Note
Upprättat; 2011; 20130415 (robnil)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Gendre, D., Oh, J., Boutté, Y., Best, J., Samuels, L., Nilsson, R., . . . Bhalerao, R. P. . (2011). The conserved Arabidopsis ECHIDNA protein mediates trans-Golgi-network trafficking and cell elongation (ed.). Paper presented at . Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108(19), 8048-8053
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The conserved Arabidopsis ECHIDNA protein mediates trans-Golgi-network trafficking and cell elongation
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2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 108, no 19, p. 8048-8053Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Multiple steps of plant growth and development rely on rapid cell elongation during which secretory and endocytic trafficking via the trans-Golgi network (TGN) plays a central role. Here, we identify the ECHIDNA (ECH) protein from Arabidopsis thaliana as a TGN-localized component crucial for TGN function. ECH partially complements loss of budding yeast TVP23 function and a Populus ECH complements the Arabidopsis ech mutant, suggesting functional conservation of the genes. Compared with wild-type, the Arabidopsis ech mutant exhibits severely perturbed cell elongation as well as defects in TGN structure and function, manifested by the reduced association between Golgi bodies and TGN as well as mislocalization of several TGN-localized proteins including vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit a1 (VHA-a1). Strikingly, ech is defective in secretory trafficking, whereas endocytosis appears unaffected in the mutant. Some aspects of the ech mutant phenotype can be phenocopied by treatment with a specific inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPases, concanamycin A, indicating that mislocalization of VHA-a1 may account for part of the defects in ech. Hence, ECH is an evolutionarily conserved component of the TGN with a central role in TGN structure and function.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9819 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1018371108 (DOI)8818fa75-b77b-4a54-867f-be5636e740ae (Local ID)8818fa75-b77b-4a54-867f-be5636e740ae (Archive number)8818fa75-b77b-4a54-867f-be5636e740ae (OAI)
Note
Upprättat; 2011; 20130207 (robnil)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, R. (2010). A study of the molecular pathways of wood formation using peptide mass spectrometry (ed.). (Doctoral dissertation). Paper presented at . Umeå: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A study of the molecular pathways of wood formation using peptide mass spectrometry
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Wood consists essentially of secondary plant cell walls, composed of a cellulose and hemicellulose network impregnated with lignin. It is formed via the development of derivatives of a thin layer of cells (the vascular cambium) into xylem cells through cell division, expansion, secondary wall formation, lignification and, finally, programmed cell death. Throughout the formation of the resulting, complex matrix (wood) diverse proteins are involved. Hence, biosynthesis of wood is tightly regulated at the molecular level, primarily by transcriptional regulation, together with various post-transcriptional processes. In the studies this thesis is based upon, a key technique for studying proteins, liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, was used to elucidate pathways of wood formation. First, proteins involved in the central transcriptional unit Mediator, regulating most essential processes in plants, were identified in arabidopsis. Mediator subunits that most likely provide secondary cell wall activity are differentiated paralogous subunits located in the tail part of the complex. Point mutations in the Mediator tail subunit, Med5#2 affect secondary cell wall lignification. Moreover, control of xylem expansion may be indirectly regulated by Med25. A strategy to integrate transcript-, protein- and metabolite-data was then developed, using data acquired from analyses of poplar mutants with perturbed wood development. The results showed that lignin biosynthesis is heavily affected at both transcript and protein levels in the mutant with the strongest phenotypic deviations. Interestingly, when transcript levels are decreased, the protein levels are increased. Finally, the front of cell wall synthesis at poplar plasma membranes was dissected. A high coverage of proteins known to be involved in the cell wall synthesizing machinery and associated components was captured, as well as several potential new ones.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, 2010. p. 84
Series
Acta Universitatis Agriculturae Sueciae, ISSN 1652-6880 ; 2010:64
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-26323 (URN)db901ffd-2270-4e45-ad42-c857ec292d8d (Local ID)978-91-576-7477-7 (ISBN)db901ffd-2270-4e45-ad42-c857ec292d8d (Archive number)db901ffd-2270-4e45-ad42-c857ec292d8d (OAI)
Note
Upprättat; 2010; 20130421 (robnil)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8373-244x

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