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Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Karlsson, A., Larsson, L. & Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A. (2018). Product-Service System Innovation Capabilities: Linkages between the Fuzzy Front End and subsequent development phases. International Journal of Production Research, 56(6), 2218-2232
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Product-Service System Innovation Capabilities: Linkages between the Fuzzy Front End and subsequent development phases
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 2218-2232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In an attempt to remain competitive, manufacturers increasingly offer integrated product-service systems (PSSs). This transition from physical products to PSSs calls for new ways of working, for example in the product development process. However, so far only limited attention has been put on capabilities needed to succeed with PSS innovation in the very early development phases – often referred to as the fuzzy front end (FFE). This article, therefore, has a dual aim: first, to further our understanding of capabilities for PSS innovation in the FFE, and second, to determine how these capabilities are linked to PSS innovation capabilities needed in subsequent development phases. Empirical data were collected from an ongoing industrial project developing an innovative PSS offering in a large manufacturing company. Individuals connected to the project reported major challenges, both experienced in the FFE and anticipated in later phases, which provided valuable information regarding capabilities needed to succeed with the endeavour. Findings reveal four links of PSS innovation capabilities: (1) adapting vocabulary and mental models to PSS, (2) handling the ‘intangible aspect’, (3) bridging organisational structures, and (4) managing new business models. PSS innovation capabilities in the FFE are also found to be of higher order (dynamic) compared to capabilities in later development phases

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Product Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63019 (URN)10.1080/00207543.2017.1365181 (DOI)000433967100009 ()
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-06-01 (svasva)

Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Lind, E., Karlsson, A. & Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A. (2017). Constraints and Capacities in Small Established Firms: The Role of Managerial Levers in the Innovation Process. In: XXVIII ISPIM Conference: Composing the Innovation Symphony. Paper presented at 28th ISPIM Conference, Vienna, 18-21 June 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constraints and Capacities in Small Established Firms: The Role of Managerial Levers in the Innovation Process
2017 (English)In: XXVIII ISPIM Conference: Composing the Innovation Symphony, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
SME, Multiple Case study, Innovation phases, Resources, Liability of smallness
National Category
Engineering and Technology Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Product Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65707 (URN)
Conference
28th ISPIM Conference, Vienna, 18-21 June 2017
Available from: 2017-09-18 Created: 2017-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, A. & Björk, J. (2017). Establishing and managing a network for continuous innovation: Invoking organizational pressure. Paper presented at 16th International CINet Conference, Stockholm, 13-15 September 2015. Creativity and Innovation Management, 26(2), 128-141
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Establishing and managing a network for continuous innovation: Invoking organizational pressure
2017 (English)In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 128-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social networks in organizations have been identified as important both in terms of increasing our understanding of innovation and for organizations to realize innovation outcomes. While previous studies have informed us of the importance of networks for innovation, we know little of how companies intentionally can design and utilize networks to achieve continuous innovation. The aim of this paper is to explore how a network for continuous innovation can be established and managed. A longitudinal case study has been performed using data covering the establishment and subsequent management of a network for supporting continuous innovation, spanning the product management and R&D department of a large multinational company. The results reveal the potential to use intra-organizational networks to invoke organizational pressure conducive for making innovation happen. This pressure is induced by autonomy and self-organizing in the network and consists of reciprocal expectations and demands between the top (management) and the bottom (employees involved in the network) of the organizational hierarchy. Implications for theory and practice are discussed

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Product Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63317 (URN)10.1111/caim.12215 (DOI)000404288900003 ()2-s2.0-85019169288 (Scopus ID)
Conference
16th International CINet Conference, Stockholm, 13-15 September 2015
Note

2017-05-11 (andbra);Konferensartikel i tidskrift

Available from: 2017-05-11 Created: 2017-05-11 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, S., Björk, J. & Karlsson, A. (2017). Exploring critical situations in the realization of radical innovation ideas. In: : . Paper presented at 18th International CINet Conference, Digitalization and innovation: designing the organization of the future, Potsdam, Germany, 10-12 September 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring critical situations in the realization of radical innovation ideas
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents an investigation of how critical situations enabling and hindering the realization of a radical innovation idea in an established and large company are managed. By gaining access to rich data through interviews with key stakeholder associated to a recently launched radical innovation the study is able to bring light to why uncertainties and complexities in a radical innovation project varies over time and how the combination of different novelty dimensions is contributing. The critical situations identified are found to all relate to events or periods when people inside the organization either are or are not convinced about and motivated by the potential and feasibility of the innovation. This observation is emphasizing a need to better understand how the management of internal resistance to radical innovation can be improved. Particularly how, when and what roles, different management functions or other people in the organization play over time.

Keywords
Radical innovation, Innovation management
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Product Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66391 (URN)
Conference
18th International CINet Conference, Digitalization and innovation: designing the organization of the future, Potsdam, Germany, 10-12 September 2017
Projects
Flow-oriented innovation-support
Available from: 2017-11-06 Created: 2017-11-06 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, A., Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A. & Lind, E. (2017). Innovation processes in SMEs: Exploring the influence of varying degrees of control. In: M.,Maier A.M.,Fadel G.,Salustri F.,Oehmen J.,Van der Loos M.,Skec S.,Kim H. (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED: . Paper presented at 21st International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED 2017, University of British Columbia (UBC) Campus, Vancouver, Canada, 21-25 August 2017 (pp. 447-456). Zagreb: The Design Society, 2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovation processes in SMEs: Exploring the influence of varying degrees of control
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED / [ed] M.,Maier A.M.,Fadel G.,Salustri F.,Oehmen J.,Van der Loos M.,Skec S.,Kim H., Zagreb: The Design Society, 2017, Vol. 2, p. 447-456Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Previous research in the field of product innovation management has focused on large firms. This is unfortunate because small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have features that clearly distinguish them from their larger counterparts and also play an important role in the global economy. In addition, SMEs often have more varying control of the whole innovation process-from identification of a customer need to delivering customer value-compared to larger companies. This article addresses this research gap by exploring how SMEs with growth ambitions, and varying degree of control, can leverage their innovation process. The article outlines results from a SWOT analysis utilizing data from a multiple case study of eight SMEs. Both 'product owning' companies (with either in-house or outsourced manufacturing) as well as manufacturing industry subcontractors were sampled. The results show indications of the influence of varying degree of control of the innovation process-relating to different phases, how knowledge and competence are considered and being reliant on others-and how SMEs and their offerings can be considered as parts of larger systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Zagreb: The Design Society, 2017
Series
DS, ISSN 2220-4334 ; 87
Keywords
Organizational processes, Case study, Organisation of product development, SWOT, Established SMEs
National Category
Engineering and Technology Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Product Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65710 (URN)2-s2.0-85029774386 (Scopus ID)
Conference
21st International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED 2017, University of British Columbia (UBC) Campus, Vancouver, Canada, 21-25 August 2017
Available from: 2017-09-18 Created: 2017-09-18 Last updated: 2018-05-25Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, A. & Bengtsson, L. (2017). The managerial challenge of setting goals conducive to individual ambidexterity. In: The managerial challenge of setting goals conducive to individual ambidexterity: . Paper presented at 18th International CINet Conference, Digitalization and innovation: designing the organization of the future, Potsdam, Germany, 10-12 September 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The managerial challenge of setting goals conducive to individual ambidexterity
2017 (English)In: The managerial challenge of setting goals conducive to individual ambidexterity, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study explores how managers’ goal setting can enable individuals to pursue both explorative and exploitative activities, i.e. individual ambidexterity. The study is based on multisource data covering the goal-setting approaches of 28 managers and perceptions of the ambidextrous climate from their departments. The results show that managers prefer different task-goal attributes when setting goals for innovation and operational activities. Innovation goals were more challenging, ambiguous, learning oriented, self-generated, long term, without a specific deadline and non-quantifiable compared to goals set for operational activities. Managers in departments characterized by a high-ambidexterity climate were also inclined to distinguish more between goals set for innovative and operative activities than other departments, particularly for the goal attributes "Attainable versus Challenging" and "Time-bound versus No specific deadline". We can therefore conclude that the way individual goals for innovation and operational activities are set relates to the level of ambidexterity on both individual and departmental levels.

Keywords
goal attributes, exploration, exploitation, innovation activities, operational activities
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Product Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66388 (URN)
Conference
18th International CINet Conference, Digitalization and innovation: designing the organization of the future, Potsdam, Germany, 10-12 September 2017
Available from: 2017-11-06 Created: 2017-11-06 Last updated: 2018-01-15Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, A. & Törlind, P. (2016). Managing the paradox of early production involvement and Innovativeness: To involve or evolve, is that the question? (ed.). In: (Ed.), N. Bojcetic ; D. Marjanovic ; N. Pavkovic; M. Storga; S. Skec (Ed.), Proceedings of International Design Conference - Design 2016: . Paper presented at International Design Conference : 16/05/2016 - 19/05/2016 (pp. 1065-1074). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing the paradox of early production involvement and Innovativeness: To involve or evolve, is that the question?
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of International Design Conference - Design 2016 / [ed] N. Bojcetic ; D. Marjanovic ; N. Pavkovic; M. Storga; S. Skec, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture , 2016, p. 1065-1074Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Early involvement of production can on the one hand create products better adapted for realization, but on the other hand introduce the risk that incremental adjustments of existing operations and processes is favoured at the expense of more radical ones. The research reported in this paper aims to explore how innovative projectteams manage this paradox of early production involvement and innovativeness. Results show that a number of separation strategies at the micro level in the organization play an important role in practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, 2016
Series
DESIGN 2016 - Proceedings, ISSN 1847-9073 ; 84
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Product Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-30023 (URN)000395390600108 ()3b02b0f4-94fb-4277-a0c0-619550a4b94e (Local ID)3b02b0f4-94fb-4277-a0c0-619550a4b94e (Archive number)3b02b0f4-94fb-4277-a0c0-619550a4b94e (OAI)
Conference
International Design Conference : 16/05/2016 - 19/05/2016
Projects
PIEp - Product Innovation Engineering Programme
Note

Godkänd; 2016; 20160403 (petert)

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, A. & Törlind, P. (2016). Mitigating lack of knowledge: a study of ideas in innovative projects (ed.). International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation, 4(3-4), 144-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mitigating lack of knowledge: a study of ideas in innovative projects
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation, ISSN 2165-0349, E-ISSN 2165-0357, Vol. 4, no 3-4, p. 144-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ideas and concepts are the carriers of innovation, which many regard as a critical source of competitive advantage. At the same time, an initial idea is untested and unrealized, i.e., it is always surrounded by a lack of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how different types of ideas develop and interact with knowledge, by focusing on remediating activities performed by design teams. Results are based on a retrospective interview study involving respondents from eight projects, all selected for their high degree of innovativeness. The analysis emphasized two types of ideas (product ideas and concept ideas) and three spaces of design knowledge (the why-space, the what-space, and the how-space). The results reveal two possibilities: either the content of the knowledge space differs depending on the type of idea, or different knowledge spaces exist. Moreover, activities conducted to improve the idea have different characteristics depending on the type of idea. It is thus important to distinguish between different types of ideas and to choose corresponding mitigation activities to support idea development.

National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Product Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11274 (URN)10.1080/21650349.2014.961553 (DOI)000377988200002 ()2-s2.0-85017263575 (Scopus ID)a349b3dd-af87-4331-b5a8-c98bf66a86d0 (Local ID)a349b3dd-af87-4331-b5a8-c98bf66a86d0 (Archive number)a349b3dd-af87-4331-b5a8-c98bf66a86d0 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 1; 20140917 (petert)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, A. & Larsson, L. (2016). Overcoming innovation inertia in production processes: Managing the innovation process (ed.). In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at Innovation and Product Development Management Conference, : 12/06/2016 - 14/06/2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Overcoming innovation inertia in production processes: Managing the innovation process
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Product Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-35108 (URN)982e194e-f8fc-408d-932d-c01d77014037 (Local ID)982e194e-f8fc-408d-932d-c01d77014037 (Archive number)982e194e-f8fc-408d-932d-c01d77014037 (OAI)
Conference
Innovation and Product Development Management Conference, : 12/06/2016 - 14/06/2016
Projects
Production Innovation
Note

För godkännande; 2016; 20160823 (lislar)

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, A. & Björk, J. (2015). Establish and Manage a network for continuous innovation: - Invoking organizational pressure (ed.). Paper presented at CINet Conference 2015 : 13/09/2015 - 15/09/2015. Paper presented at CINet Conference 2015 : 13/09/2015 - 15/09/2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Establish and Manage a network for continuous innovation: - Invoking organizational pressure
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Social networks and relationships between actors have been identified as important both in terms of increasing our understanding of innovation and for organizations’ to realize innovation outcomes. While previous studies have informed us how knowledge creation in informal network structures can be influenced and managed by subtle management techniques, we know little of how companies intentionally can create and utilize networks for continuous innovation. The aim of this paper is to explore how a network for continuous innovation can be established and managed. A longitudinal case study have been performed using data covering the establishment and subsequent management of a network for supporting continuous innovation, spanning the product management and R&D department of a large multinational company. The results argue for the importance of the creation of a support structure as one layer within the network in order to uphold the development and evolvement of the network over time through support with competence development and influence the network through different kinds of subtle management techniques. Moreover, the paper argues for the importance of invoking organizational pressure for innovation outcome.

National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Product Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-31158 (URN)53ed150b-df33-4f43-b26a-72d9bd941d90 (Local ID)53ed150b-df33-4f43-b26a-72d9bd941d90 (Archive number)53ed150b-df33-4f43-b26a-72d9bd941d90 (OAI)
Conference
CINet Conference 2015 : 13/09/2015 - 15/09/2015
Note
Godkänd; 2015; 20150717 (kannar)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2062-4318

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