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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Pauelsen, M., Vikman, I., Johansson, V., Larsson, A. & Röijezon, U. (2018). Decline in sensorimotor systems explains reduced falls self-efficacy. Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology, 42, 104-110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decline in sensorimotor systems explains reduced falls self-efficacy
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology, ISSN 1050-6411, E-ISSN 1873-5711, Vol. 42, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical performance including balance tasks is one of the main factors explaining the variance in falls self-efficacy in older adults. Balance performance is often measured by use of gross assessment scales, which assess the result of integration of all systems involved in postural control. We aimed to investigate which measurements of postural control correlate to falls self-efficacy scores as measured by the FES-I instrument, and which sensory and motor systems best explain them. A cross sectional study was designed, in which 45 older adults performed quiet stance and limits of stability trials during which their center of pressure (CoP) excursion was recorded. Falls self-efficacy was measured using the Falls Efficacy Scale - International. Eyesight, vestibular function, proprioception, reaction time and strength were also measured. Hierarchical orthogonal projection of latent structures was used to model FES-I with the CoP trials and then with the sensory and muscle function data. Fes-I could be explained to 39%, with the eyes open trials and the limits of stability trials loading the heaviest. The base model could be explained to 40% using the sensory and muscle function data, with lower limb strength, leg proprioception, neck proprioception, reaction time and eyesight loading the heaviest.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70143 (URN)10.1016/j.jelekin.2018.07.001 (DOI)000441876400013 ()30015133 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049755548 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-08-08 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-07-20 Created: 2018-07-20 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Blomgren, J., Strandell, E., Jull, G., Vikman, I. & Röijezon, U. (2018). Effects of deep cervical flexor training on impaired physiological functions associated with chronic neck pain: a systematic review. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 19, Article ID 415.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of deep cervical flexor training on impaired physiological functions associated with chronic neck pain: a systematic review
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2018 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, article id 415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:Neck pain is a major health issue with high rates of recurrence. It presents with a variety ofaltered sensorimotor functions. Exercise is a cornerstone of rehabilitation and many training methods areused. Exercise is evaluated in most randomized controlled trials on its pain relieving effects. No review hasassessed the effect of exercise on the altered physiological functions or determined if there are differentialeffects of particular training methods. This review investigated the effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF)training, a training method commonly used for patients with neck pain, and compared it to other trainingmethodsornotrainingonoutcomesofcervicalneuromuscular function, muscle size, kinematics and kinetics.Methods:Web of Science, Scopus, CINAHL, PubMed were searched from inception until January 2018. Twelverandomized controlled trials were included that compared DCF training as sole intervention to other trainingor no interventions in persons with neck pain. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to assess the methodquality. All outcome measures were analysed descriptively and meta-analyses were performed for measuresevaluated in three or more studies.Results:DCF training was compared to cervical endurance, strength, proprioception and mobility training,muscle stretching, and no intervention control groups. Physiological outcome measures includedneuromuscular co-ordination (craniocervical flexion test), functional tasks, muscle fatigability, muscle size,kinematics (joint position sense, posture and range of motion) and kinetics (strength, endurance andcontraction accuracy). Strong evidence was found for effectiveness of DCF training on neuromuscularcoordination, but it had no or small effects on strength and endurance at higher loads. DCF trainingimproved head and cervical posture, while evidence was limited or contradictory for other measures.Conclusions:DCF training can successfully address impaired neuromuscular coordination, but not cervicalflexor strength and endurance at higher contraction intensities. A multimodal training regime is proposedwhen the aim is to specifically address various impaired physiological functions associated with neck pain

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMC, 2018
Keywords
Neck pain, Deep cervical flexor training, Strength training, Physiological outcome measures, Systematic review
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71831 (URN)10.1186/s12891-018-2324-z (DOI)000451547900001 ()30486819 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057572353 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-11-30 (inah)

Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, A., Vikman, I., Välivaara, B.-M. & Engström, Å. (2018). Patterns of changes in patients' postoperative recovery from a short-term perspective (ed.). Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 33(2), 188-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of changes in patients' postoperative recovery from a short-term perspective
2018 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

To explore patterns of changes in patients' postoperative recovery over 1 month within different surgery groups.

Design

A quantitative longitudinal survey design was used.

Methods

A standardized questionnaire was used (N = 167 patients); the postoperative recovery profile for self-assessment of recovery. The postoperative recovery profile developed for hospitalized patients contains 17 items distributed over five dimensions: physical symptoms, physical function, psychological function, social function, and activity.

Findings

Overall, orthopaedic patients perceived a lower recovery than general surgery patients. All major surgery groups and subgroups except for joint replacement patients indicated significant systematic changes toward lower levels of problems. The orthopaedic patients assessed their psychological functioning as impaired, and the gastric bypass group was the most recovered.

Conclusions

The patients' expectations should be charted initially, and patients should be given realistic information to achieve a realistic hope for a good life in the future. A patient's recovery trajectory may not start after the surgery is completed. Rather, it has already commenced before surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
recovery, changes, patterns, orthopaedic, general surgery, acute, elective
National Category
Nursing Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6209 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2016.03.015 (DOI)000429206400011 ()2-s2.0-85016440739 (Scopus ID)467eea8e-597d-4be8-ba67-c88956f488e9 (Local ID)467eea8e-597d-4be8-ba67-c88956f488e9 (Archive number)467eea8e-597d-4be8-ba67-c88956f488e9 (OAI)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-04-06 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-04-26Bibliographically approved
Strömbäck, U., Engström, Å., Lundqvist, R., Lundblad, D. & Vikman, I. (2018). The second myocardial infarction: Is there any difference in symptoms and prehospital delay compared to the first myocardial infarction?. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 17(7), 652-659
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The second myocardial infarction: Is there any difference in symptoms and prehospital delay compared to the first myocardial infarction?
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 652-659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Knowledge is limited concerning the type of symptoms and the time from onset of symptoms to first medical contact at first and second myocardial infarction in the same patient.

AIM:

This study aimed to describe the type of symptoms and the time from onset of symptoms to first medical contact in first and second myocardial infarctions in men and women affected by two myocardial infarctions. Furthermore, the aim was to identify factors associated with prehospital delays ≥2 h at second myocardial infarction.

METHODS:

A retrospective cohort study with 820 patients aged 31-74 years with a first and a second myocardial infarction from 1986 through 2009 registered in the Northern Sweden MONICA registry.

RESULTS:

The most common symptoms reported among patients affected by two myocardial infarctions are typical symptoms at both myocardial infarction events. Significantly more women reported atypical symptoms at the second myocardial infarction compared to the first. Ten per cent of the men did not report the same type of symptoms at the first and second myocardial infarctions; the corresponding figure for women was 16.2%. The time from onset of symptoms to first medical contact was shorter at the second myocardial infarction compared to the first myocardial infarction. Patients with prehospital delay ≥2 h at the first myocardial infarction were more likely to have a prehospital delay ≥2 h at the second myocardial infarction.

CONCLUSIONS:

Symptoms of second myocardial infarctions are not necessarily the same as those of first myocardial infarctions. A patient's behaviour at the first myocardial infarction could predict how he or she would behave at a second myocardial infarction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
First and second myocardial infarction, prehospital delay, typical and atypical symptoms
National Category
Nursing Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68457 (URN)10.1177/1474515118777391 (DOI)000446099600011 ()29749753 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046824489 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-10-03 (marisr)

Available from: 2018-04-23 Created: 2018-04-23 Last updated: 2018-11-05Bibliographically approved
Pauelsen, M., Nyberg, L., Röijezon, U. & Vikman, I. (2017). Fear, morale, and physical performance, not past falls, mediate fallsefficacy in community dwelling older people. In: WCPT 2017 congress proceedings: . Paper presented at World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2017, Cape Town, South Africa, 2-4 July 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fear, morale, and physical performance, not past falls, mediate fallsefficacy in community dwelling older people
2017 (English)In: WCPT 2017 congress proceedings, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Fallrelatedconcerns have a large impact on wellbeing,balance performance and future falls. Theprimary focus in fallrelatedconcern research has generally been related to physical factors andprevious falls. This is mirrored by the use of the traditional fear avoidance model for falls in clinicalsettings, in which actual falls play a pivotal part in creating and perpetuating the cycle of fear activityavoidance fallsfear.Many researchers and clinicians, however, have started toacknowledge that more factors play a part in this complex issue.

Purpose: We aimed at investigating fallsefficacyin relation to several psychological, demographic andphysical factors in an effort to discover a more fitting model for explaining fallrelatedconcern.

Methods: We have visited a random population sample of 115 people, aged 70 or more and living in amunicipality in Northern Sweden. The participants were assessed for falls efficacy by means of theFalls Efficacy Scale International(FESI).We also collected data on selected potential covariatessuch as fear of falling, fall consequence concerns, falls history, physical performance, activity,cognitive performance, morale, medication and selected demographics. We then used multipleregression analyses in order to model covariate associations to prevalence and degree of fallrelatedconcern.

Results: The analyses show the following: The sample presents a median FESIscore of 21, and 36 % (CI.95limits: 27 %; 44 %) score 22 or higher, indicating poor fallrelatedefficacy. Further, 39% (CI.95 limits:30 %; 48 %) express some degree of fear of falling while 54 % (CI.95 limits: 45 %; 63 %) areconcerned about sustaining injuries from a fall (consequence concern). The correlation betweenfear of falling and falls efficacy seems weak (r = .55), indicating related but separate phenomena.Moreover, data indicate no significant associations between previous falls and falls efficacy, fear offalling, or consequence concern. On the other hand, FESIscores seem to be explained to a degreeof 48 % by the three variables physical performance, fear of falling, and morale (as measured by thePhiladelphia Geriatric Centre Morale scale).

Conclusion(s): These findings may contribute to a better understanding of fallrelatedconcerns. Perhaps fear,morale, and physical ability are stronger mediators than actual falls experience in itself. If so, thiswould call for the development of a new model which more adequately describes how fallrelatedconcerns are mediated while excluding falls as a cause.

Implications: The clinical implications of this model would mean a shift to include more psychosocial aspects toreduce fallrelatedconcern and risk of falling. An approach directed more towards morale, as well asincreasing efficacy and improving physical performance.

Keywords
Aged, Fallrelated Concern, Morale
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66094 (URN)
Conference
World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2017, Cape Town, South Africa, 2-4 July 2017
Projects
BAHRT
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-10-12 Created: 2017-10-12 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, A., Vikman, I., Välivaara, B.-M. & Engström, Å. (2017). Patients' perceptions of quality of care during the perioperative procedure. ACORN: The Journal of Perioperative Nursing in Australia, 30(3), 13-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' perceptions of quality of care during the perioperative procedure
2017 (English)In: ACORN: The Journal of Perioperative Nursing in Australia, ISSN 1448-7535, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe patients' perceptions of quality of care during the perioperative period and to identify areas for quality improvement. Design: A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used. Method: The data was collected (N=170) using a questionnaire for perioperative care. The methods were descriptive statistics, reported as percentages, and a manifest content analysis of the free text. Finding: The areas identified for improvement were information and participation. The participants lacked knowledge, preferred to hand over decision making to the hospital staff, and indicated that having personalised information about the surgery and perioperative period was important. However, too detailed information before surgery could cause increased anxiety. Conclusions: This study indicates that participation and information needs in perioperative settings seem to be situation specific. In addition, these needs seem to be personal and surgery specific. Further studies are required to clarify the differences in the satisfaction and quality of care between groups of patients in the perioperative context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Australian College of Perioperative Nurses, 2017
National Category
Nursing Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65770 (URN)10.26550/303/13.22 (DOI)2-s2.0-85030831854 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-22 Created: 2017-09-22 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Strömbäck, U., Vikman, I., Lundblad, D., Lundqvist, R. & Engström, Å. (2017). The second myocardial infarction: Higher risk factor burden and earlier second myocardial infarction in women compared to men : The Northern Sweden MONICA study. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 16(5), 418-424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The second myocardial infarction: Higher risk factor burden and earlier second myocardial infarction in women compared to men : The Northern Sweden MONICA study
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 418-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Several studies have examined various parameters and experiences when patients suffer their first myocardial infarction (MI), but knowledge about when they suffer their second MI is limited.

AIM:

To compare risk factors for MI, that is, diabetes, hypertension and smoking, for the first and second MI events in men and women affected by two MIs and to analyse the time intervals between the first and second MIs.

METHODS:

A retrospective cohort study of 1017 patients aged 25-74 years with first and second MIs from 1990 through 2009 registered in the Northern Sweden MONICA registry.

RESULTS:

More women than men have diabetes and hypertension and are smokers at the first MI. Similar differences between the genders remain at the time of the second MI for diabetes and hypertension, although both risk factors have increased. Smoking decreased at the second MI without any remaining difference between genders. Women suffer their second MI within a shorter time interval than men do. Within 16 months of their first MI, 50% of women had a second MI. The corresponding time interval for men was 33 months.

CONCLUSION:

Patients affected by an MI should be made aware of their risk of recurrent MI and that the risk of recurrence is highest during the first few years after an MI. In patients affected by two MIs, women have a higher risk factor burden and suffer their second MI earlier than men do and thus may need more aggressive and more prompt secondary prevention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Other Health Sciences Physiotherapy Nursing
Research subject
Health Science; Physiotherapy; Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-61085 (URN)10.1177/1474515116686229 (DOI)000402662800008 ()28029268 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85020204387 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-06-05 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-12-15 Created: 2016-12-15 Last updated: 2018-11-05Bibliographically approved
Strömbäck, U., Lundblad, D., Vikman, I. & Engström, Å. (2017). The second myocardial infarction: Higher risk factor burden and earlier second myocardial infarction in women compared with men. In: EuroHeartCare 2017: . Paper presented at EuroHeartCare 2017, Jonkoping, Sweden, 18 - 20 May 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The second myocardial infarction: Higher risk factor burden and earlier second myocardial infarction in women compared with men
2017 (English)In: EuroHeartCare 2017, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Nursing Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-61963 (URN)
Conference
EuroHeartCare 2017, Jonkoping, Sweden, 18 - 20 May 2017
Available from: 2017-02-13 Created: 2017-02-13 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Strömbäck, U., Vikman, I., Lundblad, D., Lundqvist, R. & Engström, Å. (2017). The second myocardial infarction: Women have a higher risk factor burden and suffer a second myocardial infarction earlier than men do. The Northern Sweden MONICA study. Paper presented at EuroHeartCare 2017, Jonkoping, Sweden, 18 - 20 May 2017. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 16(Suppl. 1), S62-S63, Article ID 165.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The second myocardial infarction: Women have a higher risk factor burden and suffer a second myocardial infarction earlier than men do. The Northern Sweden MONICA study
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S62-S63, article id 165Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Other Health Sciences Physiotherapy Nursing
Research subject
Health Science; Physiotherapy; Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63793 (URN)10.1177/1474515117700580 (DOI)000401775600104 ()28530115 (PubMedID)
Conference
EuroHeartCare 2017, Jonkoping, Sweden, 18 - 20 May 2017
Available from: 2017-06-08 Created: 2017-06-08 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, S., Martinsson, J., Välivaara, B.-M., Vikman, I. & Sävenstedt, S. (2016). Influence of self-care advice on patient satisfaction and healthcare utilization (ed.). Journal of Advanced Nursing, 72(8), 1789-1799
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of self-care advice on patient satisfaction and healthcare utilization
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 1789-1799Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThe aim of this study is to explore the influence of nurse-led self-care advice on healthcare utilization and patients' satisfaction with telephone nursing.BackgroundMany consultations in high-cost settings are for conditions that are manageable through self-care and callers with greater satisfaction with the nurse interaction are nearly four times more likely to engage in self-care.DesignCross-sectional study.MethodsQuestionnaires were sent out to 500 randomly selected callers to the Swedish Healthcare Direct in Northern Sweden during March 2014. Callers were asked about their satisfaction with the consultation, their intended actions prior to consultation, the recommendation given by the nurse and the action undertaken after the call.ResultsYoung callers and persons recommended watchful waiting or recurrence if no improvements were significantly less satisfied with their care. When calling on their own behalf, both men and women rated the severity of their symptoms equally and were advised to self-care to the same extent. Self-care advice had a constricting influence on self-reported healthcare utilization, with 66·1% of cases resulting in a lower level of care than first intended. Feeling reassured after the call was the aspect of nursing care that influenced satisfaction the most.ConclusionReceiving self-care advice rather than referral to a general practitioner influences patient satisfaction negatively. Feeling reassured after consultation is strongly related to satisfaction, which in turn has been found to increase the likelihood of engaging in self-care behaviour.

National Category
Nursing Probability Theory and Statistics Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Matemathical Statistics; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7453 (URN)10.1111/jan.12950 (DOI)000379932000007 ()27001441 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028243147 (Scopus ID)5d53ffb8-d712-4795-bf3f-07728a299db7 (Local ID)5d53ffb8-d712-4795-bf3f-07728a299db7 (Archive number)5d53ffb8-d712-4795-bf3f-07728a299db7 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20160323 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1682-8326

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