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Edskär, I. & Lidelöw, H. (2019). Dynamic Properties of Cross-Laminated Timber and Timber Truss Building Systems. Engineering structures, 186, 525-535
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic Properties of Cross-Laminated Timber and Timber Truss Building Systems
2019 (English)In: Engineering structures, ISSN 0141-0296, E-ISSN 1873-7323, Vol. 186, p. 525-535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Incorrect prediction of dynamic properties of tall buildings can lead to discomfort for humans. It is therefore important to understand the dynamic characteristics such as natural frequency, mode shape and damping and the influence they have on acceleration levels. The aim of this study is to compare two timber building system, one with cross laminated panels and one with post-and-beam elements with diagonals for stabilisation. Empirical formulae for predicting the natural frequency and mode shape are compared to measured and numerical results. Tall building assumptions such as ‘line-like’ behaviour and lumped mass at certain points were evaluated for both systems. The post-and-beam system showed a stiffer behaviour than the cross laminated system where more shear deformation occurred. Empirical formulae should be used with care until more data is collected.  For the post-and-beam systems an assumption of linearity may be appropriate, but for cross laminated systems the approximation can give results on the unsafe side. Finally, the relationship between stiffness and mass for cross laminated timber systems and its effect on dynamic properties needs to be further investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
serviceability limit state, tall building, wind-induced vibration, mode shape, natural frequency, modal analysis, modal mass
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Management and Building Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71699 (URN)10.1016/j.engstruct.2019.01.136 (DOI)000462104900042 ()2-s2.0-85062095214 (Scopus ID)
Projects
BioInnovation - Framtidens biobaserade byggande och boende
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-03-07 (inah)

Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Tsao, C. & Lidelöw, H. (2017). Development of a materials management strategy to enable continuous work flow on-site. In: Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R. (Ed.), IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017. Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017 (pp. 853-860). The International Group for Lean Construction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a materials management strategy to enable continuous work flow on-site
2017 (English)In: IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017 / [ed] Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R., The International Group for Lean Construction , 2017, p. 853-860Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When project teams are pressured to limit internal or external Lean coaching due to budgetary concerns, Lean coaches may not have sufficient time to guide project teams in materials management to support milestones. Consequently, while organized project teams will make the time to develop a strategy for managing key materials that impact the critical path, disorganized project teams will more likely manage most materials on an ad-hoc basis. This lack of a materials management strategy then leads to unrealized profits and hidden wastes on projects. As a result, this research seeks to investigate how to develop a basic materials management framework to help project teams begin determining which bulky materials should be: (1) Using a pull system (e.g., through the use of Kanban cards or milk runs) to coordinate deliveries, (2) Kitted off-site vs. on-site, and (3) Organized into prefabricated assemblies. Specifically, this paper will identify various questions, calculations, and artefacts (e.g., equipment for handling and staging materials, signage used to make the materials management strategy transparent to all project participants) that contribute to establishing a comprehensive materials management strategy. In particular, space management emerges as an important tool to organize the flow of materials to match job-site installation rates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The International Group for Lean Construction, 2017
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65883 (URN)10.24928/2017/0331 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029591158 (Scopus ID)
Conference
25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Wernicke, B., Lidelöw, H. & Stehn, L. (2017). Flow and resource efficiency measurement method in off-site production. In: Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R. (Ed.), IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017. Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017 (pp. 861-868). The International Group for Lean Construction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flow and resource efficiency measurement method in off-site production
2017 (English)In: IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017 / [ed] Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R., The International Group for Lean Construction , 2017, p. 861-868Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Although the focus remains primarily on high resource efficiency, the significance of flow efficiency in construction is continuously increasing. Flow and resource efficiency describe two competing target viewpoints, which focus on reducing non-value adding activities and maximizing resource utilization, respectively. Recent research has shown that balancing both perspectives provides a viable solution. However, the exact measurement of flow and resource efficiency in construction remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this work is to evaluate a possible flow and resource efficiency measurement method in the off-site production context of volumetric element construction, and assess the industrial relevance thereof. Work sampling has been used to collect data from a building project flowing through the off-site production system. The validity of the method has been checked statistically, through a focus-group workshop and with calculation figures from the case company. Work sampling allows flow and resource efficiency measurements in an off-site production system. The method delivers current status figures of companies, yielding a balance between flow and resource efficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The International Group for Lean Construction, 2017
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65882 (URN)10.24928/2017/0094 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029593743 (Scopus ID)
Conference
25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Wernicke, B. & Lidelöw, H. (2017). Foundation for Balancing Resources and Flow Efficiency in Industrialized Construction. In: Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y. (Ed.), ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016. Paper presented at 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management, ICCREM 2016, Edmonton, Canada, 29 September - 1 October 2016 (pp. 103-110). Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foundation for Balancing Resources and Flow Efficiency in Industrialized Construction
2017 (English)In: ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016 / [ed] Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y., Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017, p. 103-110Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Construction companies traditionally try to optimize their resource efficiency to minimize costs. Today's demand for value stream optimization along the whole supply chain cannot be resolved by that approach. To be able to strengthen the performance of the fragmented construction, supply chain measuring flow efficiency is essential to meet the customer's demand of shorter lead times. A literature study and an exploratory case study on a construction company and its supplier have been done to map existing key performance indicators (KPIs) for measuring both resource and flow efficiency. The outcomes from the literature study show possible KPIs and the connections between them. Results from the case study indicate that basic data for flow efficiency measurements exist in companies but these are underutilized. Balancing resource and flow efficiency is a challenge for all companies. Decisions made on how to manage production and construction affect this balance, thus creating a dynamic situation where the balance is different between building projects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65900 (URN)10.1061/9780784480274.013 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029600004 (Scopus ID)9780784480274 (ISBN)
Conference
2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management, ICCREM 2016, Edmonton, Canada, 29 September - 1 October 2016
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Viklund, E., Sandberg, M., Lidelöw, H. & Jansson, G. (2017). Modularization based on commonalities in house-building requirements. In: Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y. (Ed.), ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016. Paper presented at 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management, ICCREM 2016, Edmonton, Canada, 29 September - 1 October 2016 (pp. 126-134). Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modularization based on commonalities in house-building requirements
2017 (English)In: ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016 / [ed] Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y., Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017, p. 126-134Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Some of the requirements governing the design of houses are common between projects. This opens up for using modularization based on product commonalities. Though modularization is well known in the manufacturing industry, its use in house-building contexts is less studied. Even more scarce is research focusing on how requirement commonalities between one-of-a-kind products are found and managed in a modularization process. In this research, modularization from a requirements management perspective is empirically explored using a case study approach. Though the studied modularization process can be described as sequential, the process steps are highly interrelated, with overlaps and iterations. Commonalities are found by functional decomposition of the customer's portfolio projects, tracing technical solutions back to their initial requirements. These are balanced with the customer's requirements on the product and on the design automation tool. The requirement list is continuously updated based on portfolio analysis and communication of modularization results to the customer

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017
National Category
Civil Engineering Building Technologies Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management; Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-60844 (URN)10.1061/9780784480274.016 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029590804 (Scopus ID)9780784480274 (ISBN)
Conference
2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management, ICCREM 2016, Edmonton, Canada, 29 September - 1 October 2016
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Lidelöw, H. (2017). Offsite construction in Sweden: From technology-driven to integrated processes. In: Ryan E Smith; John D Quale (Ed.), Offsite Architecture: Constructing the future (pp. 214-223). London: Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Offsite construction in Sweden: From technology-driven to integrated processes
2017 (English)In: Offsite Architecture: Constructing the future / [ed] Ryan E Smith; John D Quale, London: Taylor & Francis, 2017, p. 214-223Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis, 2017
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-64791 (URN)10.4324/9781315743332 (DOI)2-s2.0-85020964055 (Scopus ID)9781317588825 (ISBN)9781138821378 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-07-05 Created: 2017-07-05 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Lidelöw, H. & Jansson, G. (2017). The effect of pre-engineering on design management methods. In: Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R. (Ed.), IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017. Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017 (pp. 523-530). The International Group for Lean Construction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of pre-engineering on design management methods
2017 (English)In: IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017 / [ed] Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R., The International Group for Lean Construction , 2017, p. 523-530Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Several methods exist for design management such as Agile project management, the Last Planner System®, and configuration in diverse variants. Construction can be realized using different degrees of pre-engineering i.e. different production strategies, which can affect the design management method. The research aim is to describe different design management methods and discuss their capacity to function in existing production strategies in construction. Data was collected as secondary data from earlier publications on Agile project management, the Last Planner® system, configuration, and visual planning. Agile project management has a strong focus on customer value and lends itself well to situations with little pre-engineering. The Last Planner System® in design has a strong focus on the co-creation of flow and coordination of actions. In industrialised housing a dialect of Last Planner System® named KI-VP is implemented drawing upon predefinition of design tasks through standardized work. Configuration is the ultimate predefined design stage, where everything can be automated based on product variants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The International Group for Lean Construction, 2017
National Category
Building Technologies Construction Management
Research subject
Timber Structures; Construction Engineering and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65884 (URN)10.24928/2017/0107 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029585650 (Scopus ID)
Conference
25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Lidelöw, H. (2017). The ER design simulation game: Experience and reflect. In: Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R. (Ed.), IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017. Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017 (pp. 515-522). The International Group for Lean Construction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ER design simulation game: Experience and reflect
2017 (English)In: IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017 / [ed] Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R., The International Group for Lean Construction , 2017, p. 515-522Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Most simulation games that exist are targeted towards experiencing and reflecting on Lean principles such as tact time, pull, Kanban, continuous improvements etc. The design phase in construction is characterised by information not being available, iterative work, specialized work tasks, and high uncertainty. The research aim is to develop and test a design simulation game that explains the design principles: lack of information, iterative work, and specialized work in order to let inexperienced people experience and reflect (ER) on the design phase. The method to develop the ER design game was to alter an already existing production sequence simulation game developed to illustrate one-piece flow. Action cards were entered into the game, changing work tasks and their sequencing as the game progressed. The ER design game demonstrates the difficulties in characterising and improving the design flow, but it does not show any methods to improve it. Lack of information, iterative work, specialized work, stop-start effects, and tact time issues all surfaced during playing the ER design game. The time frame for the game set was 45 minutes, which makes it feasible to incorporate in Lean method training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The International Group for Lean Construction, 2017
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65885 (URN)10.24928/2017/0106 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029604449 (Scopus ID)
Conference
25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Lidelöw, H. & Olofsson, T. (2017). The Structure and Predefinition of the Industrialized Construction Value Chain. In: Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y. (Ed.), ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016. Paper presented at 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management, ICCREM 2016, Edmonton, Canada, 29 September - 1 October 2016 (pp. 117-125). Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Structure and Predefinition of the Industrialized Construction Value Chain
2017 (English)In: ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016 / [ed] Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y., Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017, p. 117-125Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Industrialized construction means predefinition of products and processes. The level of predefinition is balanced against the level of needed flexibility to create the desired customer value. There is a range from no predefinition up to complete predefinition. This pattern can be repeated in different dimensions defining several decoupling points in the value chain. The aim of this paper is to map different situations of predefinition in design, supply, and production dimensions in order to understand the structure of industrialized construction value chains. A multiple case study was organized using secondary data collection from earlier work of the authors originally collected through interviews with key actors in industrialized construction companies in Sweden. The results show that long-term supplier agreements and cooperations are important to sustain industrialization of construction. A high degree of predefinition in design is a prerequisite to succeed in construction industrialization. However, there is no coupling between a high degree of predefinition in design and a high degree of mechanization and automation in production

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017
National Category
Construction Management Building Technologies
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management; Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65886 (URN)10.1061/9780784480274.015 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029603072 (Scopus ID)9780784480274 (ISBN)
Conference
2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management, ICCREM 2016, Edmonton, Canada, 29 September - 1 October 2016
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Edskär, I. & Lidelöw, H. (2017). Wind-Induced Vibrations in Timber Buildings-Parameter Study of Cross-Laminated Timber Residential Structures. Structural Engineering International, 27(2), 205-216
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wind-Induced Vibrations in Timber Buildings-Parameter Study of Cross-Laminated Timber Residential Structures
2017 (English)In: Structural Engineering International, ISSN 1016-8664, E-ISSN 1683-0350, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 205-216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A current trend (2016) to construct high-rise timber buildings is seen. In order to understand the limitations posed by the timber material, wind-induced dynamic behaviour causing vibrations in the serviceability limit state has to be studied. The aim of this research is to calculate the natural frequency and acceleration levels of timber buildings having a cross-laminated timber structure to further the understanding of its behaviour and how a change in parameters affects building performance as reflected against comfort criteria. The results were calculated through finite element modelling using commercial software and by performing a modal analysis. The parameters under scrutiny were material stiffness, wall density, damping ratio, building height, and building footprint. The results show that even at moderate building heights (12-14 storeys), the comfort criteria are not fulfilled. Furthermore, the interaction between stiffness and mass for timber buildings needs to be explored further. And since the change of building footprint has a strong influence on the dynamic behaviour, the interplay between architectural and structural design becomes more important. Finally, more data on measurements of damping in timber buildings need to be collected to further validate simulation models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering, 2017
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63686 (URN)10.2749/101686617X14881932435619 (DOI)000400418500008 ()2-s2.0-85021183724 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-06-02 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-06-02 Created: 2017-06-02 Last updated: 2018-11-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5907-7788

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