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Lundberg, M., Engström, S. & Lidelöw, H. (2019). Diffusion of innovation in a contractor company: the impact of the social system structure on the implementation process. Construction Innovation, 19(4), 629-652
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diffusion of innovation in a contractor company: the impact of the social system structure on the implementation process
2019 (English)In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 629-652Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

In the construction industry, it has proven difficult to implement and realize innovation efforts, for example in the development of industrialized construction and use of platform concepts. Thus, the purpose of this study is to characterize the innovation diffusion process in the social system of a large Swedish contractor company. Specifically, the diffusion of three innovative industrialized house-building (IHB) platforms and factors affecting their adoption and implementation (particularly effects of their perceived radicality in relation to the company's decentralized characteristics) are identified and discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was applied, using empirical material including semi-structured interviews and archival records (research reports from earlier studies at different points in time related to each innovation and annual corporate reports). The material was analyzed using Rogers' (2003) five-stage innovation process model, acknowledging the importance of social systems' structures.

Findings

Structural characteristics of the social system strongly affect innovation diffusion. In subsystems that had not been involved in initiation of the innovations, they were regarded as radical, which hindered their adoption and implementation.

Research limitations/implications

This study builds upon the recent findings that successful innovation implementation depends on a range of contingencies in the construction context. Although the diffusion of the innovations per se has been traced over a ten-year period, generalizability is limited because the results come from one construction company.

Practical implications

Contractors have invested substantially in the development of industrialized construction and use of platform concepts, but less in their implementation, so they have obtained little gain. How innovations are perceived and implemented in different subsystems affects the success of their implementation in the overarching social system.Originality/valueThis study adheres to previous calls for more research on firm level in the complex social system of construction companies by adopting a ten-year perspective on the diffusion of innovation at a large contractor addressing in particular the impact of the innovations perceived radicality in relation to the decentralized characteristics of the company.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
Keywords
case study, adoption, radical, subsystem, centralized, decentralized
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Management and Building Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75495 (URN)10.1108/CI-08-2018-0061 (DOI)000486543900007 ()
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-12-06 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-12-06Bibliographically approved
Edskär, I. & Lidelöw, H. (2019). Dynamic Properties of Cross-Laminated Timber and Timber Truss Building Systems. Engineering structures, 186, 525-535
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic Properties of Cross-Laminated Timber and Timber Truss Building Systems
2019 (English)In: Engineering structures, ISSN 0141-0296, E-ISSN 1873-7323, Vol. 186, p. 525-535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Incorrect prediction of dynamic properties of tall buildings can lead to discomfort for humans. It is therefore important to understand the dynamic characteristics such as natural frequency, mode shape and damping and the influence they have on acceleration levels. The aim of this study is to compare two timber building system, one with cross laminated panels and one with post-and-beam elements with diagonals for stabilisation. Empirical formulae for predicting the natural frequency and mode shape are compared to measured and numerical results. Tall building assumptions such as ‘line-like’ behaviour and lumped mass at certain points were evaluated for both systems. The post-and-beam system showed a stiffer behaviour than the cross laminated system where more shear deformation occurred. Empirical formulae should be used with care until more data is collected.  For the post-and-beam systems an assumption of linearity may be appropriate, but for cross laminated systems the approximation can give results on the unsafe side. Finally, the relationship between stiffness and mass for cross laminated timber systems and its effect on dynamic properties needs to be further investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
serviceability limit state, tall building, wind-induced vibration, mode shape, natural frequency, modal analysis, modal mass
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Management and Building Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71699 (URN)10.1016/j.engstruct.2019.01.136 (DOI)000462104900042 ()2-s2.0-85062095214 (Scopus ID)
Projects
BioInnovation - Framtidens biobaserade byggande och boende
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-03-07 (inah)

Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Wernicke, B., Lidelöw, H. & Simu, K. (2019). Flow Dimensions at Swedish Construction Contractors. Lean Construction Journal, 2019, 24-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flow Dimensions at Swedish Construction Contractors
2019 (English)In: Lean Construction Journal, ISSN 1555-1369, E-ISSN 1555-1369, Vol. 2019, p. 24-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research Question: How do different flow dimensions and their interrelations appear in Swedish construction settings?

Purpose: To contribute to the ongoing discussion on flow in construction by providing empirical data to a proposed flow model and widening the current understanding within Lean Construction with theory from industrialized construction and operations management.

Research Design: Transcriptions of nine in-depth interviews with managers at different Swedish contractors were utilized to identify different flow dimensions.

Findings: Results show different patterns which describe contractors’ focus on different flow dimensions.

Limitations: The study is performed in Swedish construction companies with limited generalizability to construction in general. Data collection based on interviews might struggle with objectivity and multi-case studies do not coincide with in-depth research in each single case.

Implications: Different flow dimensions are relevant within construction contractors and should be addressed by either management activities or an operations strategy.

Value for practitioners: Increased understanding of flow in construction based on empirical data enables management of different flow dimensions to evolve contractors’ operations strategies towards Lean Construction or industrialized construction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Arlington, US: Lean Construction Institute, 2019
Keywords
Industrialized construction, Lean Construction, operations management, operations strategy
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Management and Building Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76263 (URN)2-s2.0-85075594319 (Scopus ID)
Funder
European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), 174314
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 1;2019-10-15 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-12-10Bibliographically approved
Simu, K. & Lidelöw, H. (2019). Middle managers’ perceptions of operations strategies at construction contractors. Construction Management and Economics, 37(6), 351-366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Middle managers’ perceptions of operations strategies at construction contractors
2019 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 351-366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Operations strategies focus on how a firm delivers value, while business strategies focus on what to deliver and where. Lean is an operations strategy prioritizing flow efficiency. In construction, empirical underpinning of operations strategies has been limited. The aim is to capture how perceptions of operations strategy in construction practice aligns with existing theories of operations strategy organized in decision categories. Nine in-depth interviews with contractor middle managers were transcribed and analyzed to capture their perceptions of operations strategies. Results show: (1) decision categories in construction differ from manufacturing, and (2) differences between resource and flow efficient operations strategies exist. A resource efficient strategy focuses cost and delivery as competitive criteria, while customer value is targeted in a flow efficient strategy. Proposed structural decision categories are standardization, organization and production planning, supply chain, and infrastructural decision categories are human resources, continuous improvement, long-term perspective, process vs. project, and performance measurements. Infrastructural categories are more difficult to replicate and render competitive advantage if successfully aligned with business strategy. An operations strategy strictly focused on project delivery, such as lean construction, is not automatically aligned with the business strategy, but can achieve satisfactory project performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Competitive advantage, construction management, decision categories, Lean Construction, project management
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Management and Building Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-74379 (URN)10.1080/01446193.2018.1542739 (DOI)000468654100001 ()2-s2.0-85066086477 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-06-11 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Tsao, C. & Lidelöw, H. (2017). Development of a materials management strategy to enable continuous work flow on-site. In: Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R. (Ed.), IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017. Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017 (pp. 853-860). The International Group for Lean Construction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a materials management strategy to enable continuous work flow on-site
2017 (English)In: IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017 / [ed] Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R., The International Group for Lean Construction , 2017, p. 853-860Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When project teams are pressured to limit internal or external Lean coaching due to budgetary concerns, Lean coaches may not have sufficient time to guide project teams in materials management to support milestones. Consequently, while organized project teams will make the time to develop a strategy for managing key materials that impact the critical path, disorganized project teams will more likely manage most materials on an ad-hoc basis. This lack of a materials management strategy then leads to unrealized profits and hidden wastes on projects. As a result, this research seeks to investigate how to develop a basic materials management framework to help project teams begin determining which bulky materials should be: (1) Using a pull system (e.g., through the use of Kanban cards or milk runs) to coordinate deliveries, (2) Kitted off-site vs. on-site, and (3) Organized into prefabricated assemblies. Specifically, this paper will identify various questions, calculations, and artefacts (e.g., equipment for handling and staging materials, signage used to make the materials management strategy transparent to all project participants) that contribute to establishing a comprehensive materials management strategy. In particular, space management emerges as an important tool to organize the flow of materials to match job-site installation rates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The International Group for Lean Construction, 2017
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65883 (URN)10.24928/2017/0331 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029591158 (Scopus ID)
Conference
25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Wernicke, B., Lidelöw, H. & Stehn, L. (2017). Flow and resource efficiency measurement method in off-site production. In: Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R. (Ed.), IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017. Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017 (pp. 861-868). The International Group for Lean Construction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flow and resource efficiency measurement method in off-site production
2017 (English)In: IGLC 2017: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction 2017 / [ed] Brilakis I.,Walsh K.,Sacks R., The International Group for Lean Construction , 2017, p. 861-868Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Although the focus remains primarily on high resource efficiency, the significance of flow efficiency in construction is continuously increasing. Flow and resource efficiency describe two competing target viewpoints, which focus on reducing non-value adding activities and maximizing resource utilization, respectively. Recent research has shown that balancing both perspectives provides a viable solution. However, the exact measurement of flow and resource efficiency in construction remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this work is to evaluate a possible flow and resource efficiency measurement method in the off-site production context of volumetric element construction, and assess the industrial relevance thereof. Work sampling has been used to collect data from a building project flowing through the off-site production system. The validity of the method has been checked statistically, through a focus-group workshop and with calculation figures from the case company. Work sampling allows flow and resource efficiency measurements in an off-site production system. The method delivers current status figures of companies, yielding a balance between flow and resource efficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The International Group for Lean Construction, 2017
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65882 (URN)10.24928/2017/0094 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029593743 (Scopus ID)
Conference
25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 9-12 July 2017
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Wernicke, B. & Lidelöw, H. (2017). Foundation for Balancing Resources and Flow Efficiency in Industrialized Construction. In: Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y. (Ed.), ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016. Paper presented at 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management, ICCREM 2016, Edmonton, Canada, 29 September - 1 October 2016 (pp. 103-110). Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foundation for Balancing Resources and Flow Efficiency in Industrialized Construction
2017 (English)In: ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016 / [ed] Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y., Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017, p. 103-110Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Construction companies traditionally try to optimize their resource efficiency to minimize costs. Today's demand for value stream optimization along the whole supply chain cannot be resolved by that approach. To be able to strengthen the performance of the fragmented construction, supply chain measuring flow efficiency is essential to meet the customer's demand of shorter lead times. A literature study and an exploratory case study on a construction company and its supplier have been done to map existing key performance indicators (KPIs) for measuring both resource and flow efficiency. The outcomes from the literature study show possible KPIs and the connections between them. Results from the case study indicate that basic data for flow efficiency measurements exist in companies but these are underutilized. Balancing resource and flow efficiency is a challenge for all companies. Decisions made on how to manage production and construction affect this balance, thus creating a dynamic situation where the balance is different between building projects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65900 (URN)10.1061/9780784480274.013 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029600004 (Scopus ID)9780784480274 (ISBN)
Conference
2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management, ICCREM 2016, Edmonton, Canada, 29 September - 1 October 2016
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, M., Lidelöw, H. & Engström, S. (2017). Methods used for knowledge management and organizational learning in the practice of construction projects: a systematic literature review. In: Craig Thomson (Ed.), Proceedings of working papers from the ARCOM and BEAM Centre Early Career Researcher and Doctoral Workshop on Building Asset Management: . Paper presented at ARCOM and BEAM Centre Early Career Researcher and Doctoral Workshop on Building Asset Management, Glasgow, 20 January 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methods used for knowledge management and organizational learning in the practice of construction projects: a systematic literature review
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of working papers from the ARCOM and BEAM Centre Early Career Researcher and Doctoral Workshop on Building Asset Management / [ed] Craig Thomson, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66767 (URN)
Conference
ARCOM and BEAM Centre Early Career Researcher and Doctoral Workshop on Building Asset Management, Glasgow, 20 January 2017
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2019-11-28Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, M., Lidelöw, H. & Engström, S. (2017). Methods used in the everyday practice of construction projects for knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer. In: : . Paper presented at 5th International Workshop When Social Science Meets Lean and BIM, Aalborg, Denmark, 26-27 of January, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methods used in the everyday practice of construction projects for knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many construction practitioners and researchers would agree that acquiring the knowledge created in construction projects is a prerequisite for organizational learning and improved practice. This applies also to continuous improvement by a lean strategy. Various technological tools and methods for knowledge acquisition have been proposed, but their success depends on acknowledging the involved individuals and on the interaction between project actors, i.e. embracing the principle of respect for people in a lean strategy. A systematic literature review to identify methods used in the everyday practice in construction projects for the sharing and transfer of tacit knowledge has been performed.

Findings indicate that a combination of technological and social methods are used for knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer in construction projects. Social methods such as workshops, different kinds of often informal face-to-face meetings, various forms of reviews, mentorships, and site visits, are commonly used for sharing and transfer of tacit knowledge. Therefore, these methods which also often involve different actors should form part of a lean construction strategy.

National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Management and Building Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-67614 (URN)
Conference
5th International Workshop When Social Science Meets Lean and BIM, Aalborg, Denmark, 26-27 of January, 2017
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2019-11-28Bibliographically approved
Viklund, E., Sandberg, M., Lidelöw, H. & Jansson, G. (2017). Modularization based on commonalities in house-building requirements. In: Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y. (Ed.), ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016. Paper presented at 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management, ICCREM 2016, Edmonton, Canada, 29 September - 1 October 2016 (pp. 126-134). Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modularization based on commonalities in house-building requirements
2017 (English)In: ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016 / [ed] Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y., Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017, p. 126-134Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Some of the requirements governing the design of houses are common between projects. This opens up for using modularization based on product commonalities. Though modularization is well known in the manufacturing industry, its use in house-building contexts is less studied. Even more scarce is research focusing on how requirement commonalities between one-of-a-kind products are found and managed in a modularization process. In this research, modularization from a requirements management perspective is empirically explored using a case study approach. Though the studied modularization process can be described as sequential, the process steps are highly interrelated, with overlaps and iterations. Commonalities are found by functional decomposition of the customer's portfolio projects, tracing technical solutions back to their initial requirements. These are balanced with the customer's requirements on the product and on the design automation tool. The requirement list is continuously updated based on portfolio analysis and communication of modularization results to the customer

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017
National Category
Civil Engineering Building Technologies Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management; Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-60844 (URN)10.1061/9780784480274.016 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029590804 (Scopus ID)9780784480274 (ISBN)
Conference
2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management, ICCREM 2016, Edmonton, Canada, 29 September - 1 October 2016
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5907-7788

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