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Lidelöw, S., Örn, T., Luciani, A. & Rizzo, A. (2019). Energy-efficiency measures for heritage buildings: a literature review. Sustainable cities and society, 45, 231-242
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy-efficiency measures for heritage buildings: a literature review
2019 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 45, p. 231-242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The energy performance of heritage buildings is attracting growing interest in research and practice. Accordingly, as shown by our literature review, increasing numbers of articles on energy-efficiency measures for heritage buildings are being published in peer-reviewed journals. However, there is no overview of how energy efficiency and heritage conservation have been approached in the studies. To address this gap we categorized and assessed the identified studies in terms of two key elements of such investigations: energy analysis and analysis of cultural heritage values. Most of the studies evaluate and propose measures to reduce the operational energy use of single heritage buildings, and fewer have applied a broader system perspective. Moreover, the underlying notion of the buildings’ cultural heritage values seems to have been derived mainly from international conventions and agreements, while potentially significant architectural, cultural and historical factors have been rarely discussed. Our findings highlight that, when considering energy improvements, cultural heritage values should be more explicitly articulated and analysed in relation to established conservation principles or methodologies. Besides further scientific study, this point to the need of designing best-practice approaches that allow transparency and knowledge sharing about the complex relationships between energy efficiency and heritage conservation of buildings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Energy analysis, energy performance, energy use, conservation, historic preservation, cultural heritage
National Category
Architectural Engineering Construction Management
Research subject
Architecture; Construction Management and Building Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71085 (URN)10.1016/j.scs.2018.09.029 (DOI)000455274500021 ()2-s2.0-85057621729 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-01-25 (inah)

Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2019-01-25Bibliographically approved
Rizzo, A. (2019). Megaprojects and the limits of ‘green resilience’ in the global South: Two cases from Malaysia and Qatar. Urban Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Megaprojects and the limits of ‘green resilience’ in the global South: Two cases from Malaysia and Qatar
2019 (English)In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The emergence of the climate change discourse in urban planning emphasises resilience as a key concept to deal with issues such as climate mitigation and adaptation, and urban health. What we have termed in this article ‘green resilience’, the coalescence of technological solutions and resilience thinking to solve cities’ ecological issues, is constantly gaining traction in urban planning research. However, green resilience often fails to take into account the socio-political and spatial processes that pertain to the exploitation of land for urban development particularly in the global South. Based on our latest research on two urban megaprojects, in Johor-Singapore (Malaysia) and Doha (Qatar), in this article we build a critique of green resilience and urbanism by leveraging research in the fields of environmental humanities and urban planning. © Urban Studies Journal Limited 2019.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
global South, green resilience, green urbanism, megaprojects
National Category
Architectural Engineering
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73491 (URN)10.1177/0042098018812009 (DOI)2-s2.0-85062856606 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-12-10
Rizzo, A. (2019). Predatory cities: unravelling the consequences of resource-predatory projects in the global South. Urban geography, 40(1), 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predatory cities: unravelling the consequences of resource-predatory projects in the global South
2019 (English)In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we outline a framework to study what we have termed "Predatory Cities", using the artificial offshore island of The Pearl in Qatar as a case study. By focusing on the nexus between urbanisation and resources, we will argue that the master-planning of new cities in the booming global South implies both the access and cheap exploitation of a set of, on the one hand, intangible and, on the other hand, tangible resources that exceed the traditional boundaries. Our point of departure is that the cheap appropriation and exploitation of alien architecture images and resource networks for the making of new, master-planned cities has become a necessary, but highly unsustainable, strategy to survive an increasingly competitive global offering of new destinations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Megaprojects, predatory cities, resource-urbanisation nexus, global South
National Category
Architectural Engineering
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73306 (URN)10.1080/02723638.2018.1505156 (DOI)000456341700001 ()2-s2.0-85058522816 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-03-25 (inah)

Available from: 2019-03-25 Created: 2019-03-25 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Chapman, D., Nilsson, K. L., Rizzo, A. & Larsson, A. (2019). Winter City Urbanism: Enabling All Year Connectivity for Soft Mobility. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(10), Article ID 1820.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Winter City Urbanism: Enabling All Year Connectivity for Soft Mobility
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 10, article id 1820Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores connectivity for soft mobility in the winter season. Working with residents from the sub-arctic city of Luleå, Sweden, the research examines how the interaction between the built environment and winter season affects people’s use of the outdoor environment. The research questions for this study are, 1) how do residents perceive the effects of winter on an areas spatial structure and pattern of streets and pathways? and 2) what enablers and barriers impact resident soft mobility choices and use of the public realm in winter? Methods used were mental mapping and photo elicitation exercises. These were used to gain a better understanding of people’s perception of soft mobility in winter. The results were analysed to identify how soft mobility is influenced by the winter season. The discussion highlights that at the neighbourhood scale, residents perceive that the winter alters an areas spatial structure and pattern of streets and pathways. It was also seen to reduce ease of understanding of the public realm and townscape. In conclusion, it is argued that new and re-tooled town planning strategies, such as extending blue/ green infrastructure planning to include white space could help better enable all year outdoor activity in winter cities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
urban design, soft mobility, walkable environment, physical activity, health outcomes, active living
National Category
Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70506 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16101820 (DOI)000470967500154 ()31121986 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066831352 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-06-27 (johcin);

Artikeln har tidigare förekommit som manuskript i avhandling.

Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Ebrahimabadi, S., Johansson, C., Rizzo, A. & Nilsson, K. (2018). Microclimate assessment method for urban design: A case study in subarctic climate (ed.). Urban Design International, 23(2), 116-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microclimate assessment method for urban design: A case study in subarctic climate
2018 (English)In: Urban Design International, ISSN 1357-5317, E-ISSN 1468-4519, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 116-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interest in climate-sensitive urban design has grown in recent decades. Nevertheless, there are various difficulties associated with such an approach. One of these is the lack of simple comfort assessment tools. This paper presents a method for microclimate assessment that is composed of a wind comfort analysis and a microclimate assessment based on measuring a combination of solar access and wind velocity. The study includes analysis of a proposed urban project situated in Kiruna, a Swedish town located in the subarctic region of the country. The results from the simulations were then overlaid to produce combined microclimate maps for three specific dates: winter solstice, spring equinox and summer solstice. The maps illustrate relative microclimate differences between areas in the proposed project based on combinations of wind/lee and sun/shadow conditions. The outcomes showed that only a small proportion of the area studied had favourable microclimate conditions at the winter solstice and spring equinox. The thermal comfort Index OUT_SET* was calculated for the summer solstice in the study area. Comparisons between the spatial distribution of OUT_SET* values and the microclimate assessment map showed a large degree of correlation. The method is intended to be a simple and representative evaluation of microclimate

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2018
Keywords
microclimate assessment, outdoor comfort, wind comfort, urban design, subarctic climate, Civil engineering and architecture - Architecture and architectural conservation and restoration, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Arkitektur och bebyggelsevård
National Category
Architectural Engineering
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12071 (URN)10.1057/udi.2015.26 (DOI)000455278000005 ()2-s2.0-85050957324 (Scopus ID)b1edd3cf-8278-43ef-881b-cf27748aa7ce (Local ID)b1edd3cf-8278-43ef-881b-cf27748aa7ce (Archive number)b1edd3cf-8278-43ef-881b-cf27748aa7ce (OAI)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-08-07 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Chapman, D., Nilsson, K., Larsson, A. & Rizzo, A. (2017). Climatic barriers to soft-mobility in winter: Lulea, Sweden as case study. Sustainable cities and society, 35, 574-580
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climatic barriers to soft-mobility in winter: Lulea, Sweden as case study
2017 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 35, p. 574-580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urban form can moderate the effects of weather on human movement. As such, the interrelationship between built environment, weather and human movement is a critical component of urban design. This paper explores the impacts of weather on non-motorised human movement (soft-mobility). Throughout we look at soft-mobility from the citizen’s perspective and highlight the barriers to soft-mobility in winter.

The aim of this study was to test the traditional pallet of winter city urban design considerations. Those of solar-access, wind and snow management and explore other weather and terrain conditions that act as barriers to soft-mobility in winter. This study is based on survey responses from 344 citizens in the sub-arctic area of Sweden. Outcomes from the research highlight that rain, icy surfaces and darkness are today’s most significant barriers to soft-mobility in winter.

Results from this study link changing barriers to soft-mobility in winter with climate change. The paper concludes that future urban design and planning for winter cities needs to consider a wider pallet of weather conditions, especially rain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Winter Cities, Resilience, Outdoor Activity, Walkability, Urban Microclimate
National Category
Social Sciences Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65555 (URN)10.1016/j.scs.2017.09.003 (DOI)000415898200049 ()2-s2.0-85029311543 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-09-14 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-09-10 Created: 2017-09-10 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Rizzo, A. (2017). From Petro-Urbanism to Knowledge Megaprojects in the Persian Gulf: Qatar Foundation's Education City. In: Ayona Datta, Abdul Shaban (Ed.), Ayona Datta; Abdul Shaban (Ed.), Mega-Urbanization in the Global South: Fast Cities and New Urban Utopias of the Postcolonial State (pp. 101-122). Paper presented at . New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Petro-Urbanism to Knowledge Megaprojects in the Persian Gulf: Qatar Foundation's Education City
2017 (English)In: Mega-Urbanization in the Global South: Fast Cities and New Urban Utopias of the Postcolonial State / [ed] Ayona Datta, Abdul Shaban, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 101-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2017
Series
Routledge Studies in Urbanism and the City
National Category
Architectural Engineering
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-21084 (URN)2-s2.0-85027197204 (Scopus ID)b06e8fb8-7759-4123-85fc-a24795c9b1a1 (Local ID)978-0-415-74551-2 (ISBN)b06e8fb8-7759-4123-85fc-a24795c9b1a1 (Archive number)b06e8fb8-7759-4123-85fc-a24795c9b1a1 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Rizzo, A. (2017). Green Megaprojects and Displacement in the Global South: Uncovering the Rationales of State-Led Development in Malaysia and Qatar (ed.). In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at Resilient Cities for Human Flourishing: Governing the Asia-Pacific Urban Transition in the Anthropocene (NUS, Singapore, 2-3 Mars 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Green Megaprojects and Displacement in the Global South: Uncovering the Rationales of State-Led Development in Malaysia and Qatar
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The “Green” rhetoric is constantly gaining traction in urban planning research. In line with anthropocenic thinking, the study of green cities and infrastructures has promised a straightforward recipe to solve many urban issues (e.g., climate mitigation and resilience, urban health, etc.). However, green city/infrastructure proponents, while emphasizing the positive environmental, economic, and health aspects of these projects, often neglect important socio-political and spatial considerations that are crucial for understanding the dramatic transformation of non-urbanized and peri-urban territories. Based on my latest research on urban megaprojects in Johor, Malaysia, and Doha, Qatar, in this paper I will critically re-discuss the green city/infrastructure idea by analyzing megaprojects’ biogeophysical and social displacements in peri-urban territories in the global South.

National Category
Architectural Engineering
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-24031 (URN)962666fd-e3c0-4241-a78c-b4f0910e7255 (Local ID)962666fd-e3c0-4241-a78c-b4f0910e7255 (Archive number)962666fd-e3c0-4241-a78c-b4f0910e7255 (OAI)
Conference
Resilient Cities for Human Flourishing: Governing the Asia-Pacific Urban Transition in the Anthropocene (NUS, Singapore, 2-3 Mars 2017
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2019-01-17
Rizzo, A. (2017). Managing the energy transition in a tourism-driven economy: The case of Malta. Sustainable cities and society, 33, 126-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing the energy transition in a tourism-driven economy: The case of Malta
2017 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 33, p. 126-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to assess Malta’s government capacity to manage the possible environmental and social conflicts arising from the implementation of its renewable energy agenda to comply with EU’s 2020 energy package. The country has targeted photovoltaic technologies to achieve a 10% of renewable energy share in the final consumption of energy by 2020. Malta is a popular tourist destination, it hosts three UNESCO world heritage sites, and it is one of the smallest, although densely populated, countries in the European Union. From the encroachment of PV parks with the existing urban/rural landscape, we found a number of issues worth to be investigated such as the location of solar power plants, participatory planning mechanisms, and aesthetic-design considerations for integrating photovoltaic into the existing urban fabric. The study is based on exploratory interviews with institutional stakeholders and document analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Architectural Engineering
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-61254 (URN)10.1016/j.scs.2016.12.005 (DOI)000406309500010 ()2-s2.0-85011094604 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-06-27 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2016-12-27 Created: 2016-12-27 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Rizzo, A. & Galanakis, M. (2017). Problematizing transdisciplinary urbanism research: A reply to “Seeking Northlake” [Letter to the editor]. Cities, 64, 98-99
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Problematizing transdisciplinary urbanism research: A reply to “Seeking Northlake”
2017 (English)In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 64, p. 98-99Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Architectural Engineering
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-60715 (URN)10.1016/j.cities.2016.11.001 (DOI)000397552400011 ()2-s2.0-85007303144 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-28 Created: 2016-11-28 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6831-8857

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