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Höök, Matilda
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Höök, M., Stehn, L. & Berge, S. (2015). The development of a portfolio of business models: a longitudinal case study of a building material company (ed.). Paper presented at Annual ARCOM Conference : 07/09/2015 - 09/09/2015. Construction Management and Economics, 33(5-6), 334-348
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The development of a portfolio of business models: a longitudinal case study of a building material company
2015 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 33, no 5-6, p. 334-348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dynamic aspects of intended company change can be related to the development and management of a portfolio of business models with regard to competence deployment and to performance. A portfolio of business models is seen as a reflection of the realized strategy of a company, and the dynamics aspects of company change are connected to internal and external critical strategic incidents. The business model elements considered in this research are market position, offering, and operational platform enabling a differentiation between strategic and operational effectiveness. The evolution of a Swedish supplier of building components and systems during a 15-year period is examined. The process data consists of temporal phases where a shift of phase is defined as a change of a specific portfolio of business models. The concept of a portfolio of business models helped to discover new and conflicting standardized or customized business models that were not always intended by the company. The findings indicate that unawareness of intended actions led to unintended allocation of resources or integration mechanisms that negatively affected company performance. On the other hand gains can be achieved if a strategy is deliberately managed as a portfolio of business models which then also can be a tool for managing change in a company

National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-16303 (URN)10.1080/01446193.2015.1075052 (DOI)000361189600002 ()2-s2.0-84941807030 (Scopus ID)fed26102-b1e3-45f0-95e3-aeb97286d95f (Local ID)fed26102-b1e3-45f0-95e3-aeb97286d95f (Archive number)fed26102-b1e3-45f0-95e3-aeb97286d95f (OAI)
Conference
Annual ARCOM Conference : 07/09/2015 - 09/09/2015
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20150826 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Höök, M. & Stehn, L. (2014). Exploring the management of multiple business models in one company (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), Proceedings 30th Annual Association of Researchers in Construction Management Conference: . Paper presented at Annual ARCOM Conference : 01/09/2014 - 03/09/2014 (pp. 1315-1324). : Association of Researchers in Construction Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the management of multiple business models in one company
2014 (English)In: Proceedings 30th Annual Association of Researchers in Construction Management Conference, Association of Researchers in Construction Management , 2014, p. 1315-1324Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Increased demands for responsiveness and efficiency have led specialized Swedish manufacturing firms and contractors to adopt new production and product strategies. Some firms have adopted multiple business models (BMs) concurrently in order to be competitive in the modern market. A BM can be seen as a conceptual blueprint of a company's money earning logic, and can act as a guiding instrument towards competitiveness. It is known that companies trying to compete with both low-cost and differentiation BMs face challenges such as conflicting value chains and straddling costs. However, further understanding of various aspects of BMs, their implementation and effects (particularly in the construction industry) is required. Thus, the aim of this paper is to explore BM management in a manufacturing firm in the Swedish construction industry, which has adopted evolving BMs (some concurrently) in recent years. The results, based on analysis of long-term (15 years) process data, indicate that strategic events and decisions influence the management of parallel BMs, and that strategic events are important for competitiveness. They also show that successful balancing of concurrent BMs can yield synergistic benefits, such as resource flexibility and lower vulnerability in the construction market. Due to its exploratory nature, this work serves as a first step towards a wider and more general understanding of the management of multiple BMs in construction firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association of Researchers in Construction Management, 2014
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-30978 (URN)500b925c-df27-49aa-8bb9-2e7f8ab7278a (Local ID)978-09-5523-908-3 (ISBN)500b925c-df27-49aa-8bb9-2e7f8ab7278a (Archive number)500b925c-df27-49aa-8bb9-2e7f8ab7278a (OAI)
Conference
Annual ARCOM Conference : 01/09/2014 - 03/09/2014
Note
Godkänd; 2014; 20141202 (johsod)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Höök, M. & Stehn, L. (2008). Applicability of lean principles and practices in industrialized housing production (ed.). Paper presented at . Construction Management and Economics, 26(10), 1091-1100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applicability of lean principles and practices in industrialized housing production
2008 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1091-1100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The applicability of lean principles and practices to industrialized housing in Sweden are examined, taking the production culture into consideration. The factory production of industrialized housing shows apparent similarities to manufacturing, but areas related to fully integrated lean production practices, such as error proofing and standardized work floor and equipment maintenance, are scarce. Hence, applicability of lean principles and practices to industrialized housing production is clearly influenced by a production culture that has similarities to a traditional construction culture. Setting up industrialized housing production thus requires careful implementation of lean principles if workers from traditional building are moved into factories, and managers still adhere to the prevailing site-based production mentality. However, the influence of the traditional construction project culture is not solely a constraint; flexible teams that take their own responsibility are also important in a lean culture. Hence, retaining parts of the existing construction mentality, context and way of working is also central when discussing lean applicability in industrialized housing.

National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12446 (URN)10.1080/01446190802422179 (DOI)2-s2.0-57749088414 (Scopus ID)b98bf5a0-de20-11dd-bf31-000ea68e967b (Local ID)b98bf5a0-de20-11dd-bf31-000ea68e967b (Archive number)b98bf5a0-de20-11dd-bf31-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2008; 20090109 (bajo)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Höök, M. (2008). Lean culture in industrialized housing: a study of timber volume element prefabrication (ed.). (Doctoral dissertation). Paper presented at . Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lean culture in industrialized housing: a study of timber volume element prefabrication
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Industrialization and the use of timber have been put forward by means of its potential for increased efficiency in housing construction. Industrialized housing is related to learning from manufacturing, but the construction culture still has to be considered when development is discussed. There is room for further improvements in industrialized housing, especially related to culture. Most scientific work on industrialized housing is based on learning from the lean concept, which also has been argued to act as a catalyst for cultural change. Cultural change related to the lean concept is however a lacking area in construction research and specifically in industrialized housing. The aim of the thesis is thus to describe and understand how to approach a lean culture in industrialized housing. Based on a theoretical future state (from a lean culture perspective) and an empirical-based current state of Swedish industrialized Timber Volume Element (TVE) housing, this thesis evaluates the gap between the two states and proposes strategies for change. The thesis is based on four appended papers and a cover paper, where papers and the cover paper have their theoretical basis in the lean concept and the construction culture. Empirical results are based on data gathered in a multiple case study and three focus group surveys with four Swedish industrialized (TVE) housing companies, a production questionnaire with workers at the TVE companies, and a single case study at one of the TVE companies. A survey comprising 64 potential customers was also used in the collection of empirical data. Results in the thesis show that industrialized TVE housing has similarities to manufacturing e.g. due to stable supplier relations, a single process owner and the repetitive factory production. However, it is found that the construction culture (based on norms of traditional, on-site and project-based construction) still influence the organizational culture of industrialized housing, e.g., lacking standardization of work and routines, lacking employee loyalty to settled strategies and a lack of top-management support and clear strategies. It is shown that a long-term influence and cultural change towards a lean culture in industrialized housing is achieved by: - Standardization of process - Managing unique projects in repetitive process - A top-down (performance focused) and bottom-up (person focused) change process - Small-step changes

Abstract [sv]

Industriellt och träbaserat byggande har lyfts fram för sin potential för en ökad effektivitet i husbyggandet. Industriellt husbyggande kan relateras till lärande från tillverkningsindustrin, men byggandekulturen måste fortfarande beaktas när utveckling av industriellt husbyggande diskuteras. Det finns möjligheter till ytterligare förbättringar och dessa är speciellt relaterade till kultur. Forskning inom industriellt husbyggande är främst baserat på lärande från lean-konceptet, vilket också har argumenterats vara en katalysator för att uppnå förändringar i kultur. Kulturella förändringar relaterade till lean-konceptet utgör däremot ett glapp i byggforskningen och i synnerhet när det gäller industriellt husbyggande. Avhandlingens syfte är därmed att beskriva och förstå hur en lean kultur kan uppnås i industriellt husbyggande. Baserat på ett teoretiskt börläge (från ett kulturellt perspektiv) och ett empiriskt baserat nuläge för Svenskt industriellt TräVolymByggande (TVB), utvärderar denna avhandling glappet mellan nuläget och börläget och öreslårförändringsstrategier.Avhandlingen baseras på fyra artiklar och en kappa, där artiklarna och kappan har sin teoretiska bas i lean-teori och byggandekultur. Empiriska resultat är baserade på data insamlade genom en multipel fallstudie och tre fokusgruppintervjuer med fyra svenska TVB-företag, en produktionsenkät med arbetare vid TVB-företagen samt en fallstudie vid ett av TVB-företagen. Intervjuer med 64 potentiella kunder har också använts vid insamlandet av empirisk data. De funna resultaten i avhandlingen visar att trävolymbyggande har likheter med tillverkningsindustrin, såsom stabila leverantörsrelationer, en processägare och en repetitiv fabriksproduktion. Däremot påverkar byggandekulturen (som är baserad på värden i traditionellt plats- och projektbaserat byggande), fortfarande organisationskulturen i industriellt husbyggande, t.ex. när det gäller bristen på standardiserade arbetssätt och rutiner, bristande lojalitet hos anställda gällande fastställda strategier, samt bristande support och tydliga strategier från företagsledningen. En långsiktig påverkan och förändring av kulturen mot en lean kultur i industriellt husbyggande kan uppnås genom: -Standardisering av processer - Hantering av unika projekt i en återkommande process - Förändringsprocesser med ett samtidigt "top-down" (prestationsbaserat) och "bottom-up" (personrelaterat) perspektiv - Förändringar i små steg

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2008
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544 ; 2008:21
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-25744 (URN)aed7ba00-1c14-11dd-8384-000ea68e967b (Local ID)aed7ba00-1c14-11dd-8384-000ea68e967b (Archive number)aed7ba00-1c14-11dd-8384-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2008; 20080507 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Stehn, L. & Höök, M. (2008). Lean principles in industrialized housing production: the need for a cultural change (ed.). Paper presented at . Lean Construction Journal, 20-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lean principles in industrialized housing production: the need for a cultural change
2008 (English)In: Lean Construction Journal, ISSN 1555-1369, E-ISSN 1555-1369, p. 20-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The deep-rooted project culture in construction, e.g. including the one-of-a-kindness of the project, the production set up, the construction site and the temporary organization, is stated to be a hindrance when applying lean principles. However, the biggest challenge to achieving a long-term benefit of lean application in industrialized housing production (80 % of the work in a factory environment) is here argued to be to approach a lean culture. The aim of this paper is therefore to deepen the understanding of how to approach a lean culture in industrialized housing production. A production questionnaire shows that industrialized housing production displays a projectbased culture similar to that found in on-site construction with low motivation for, e.g., error-proofing and continuous improvement. Results from the questionnaire and a case study show that workers rather fix problems as they arise ahead of focusing on errorproofing and continuous improvement. Lean Construction research has traditionally (up to latest years) focused on a top-down (top-management initiated project performance) tool approach to improve construction projects. However, theoretical and empirical proofs show that error-proofing and continuous improvement is statistically connected to worker motivation, and that workers follow standardized routines if they are visual and clear to workers. It is also shown that workers do not take own responsibility to obtain standardization in work and maintenance of equipment and tools. Therefore a simultaneous top-down/bottom-up (person focused) approach to achieve a lean culture in industrialized housing production is proposed. Generally, the study also points to more research to obtain a deeper understanding of lean culture and cultural change in construction.

National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-13115 (URN)c4a5a560-9926-11dd-bc49-000ea68e967b (Local ID)c4a5a560-9926-11dd-bc49-000ea68e967b (Archive number)c4a5a560-9926-11dd-bc49-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2008; 20081013 (lms)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Höök, M. (2006). Customer value in lean prefabrication of housing considering both construction and manufacturing (ed.). In: (Ed.), R. Sacks; S. Bertelsen (Ed.), Understanding and Managing the Construction Process: Theory and Practice: Proceedings of the 14th Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction. Paper presented at Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction : 25/07/2006 - 27/07/2006 (pp. 583-594). : Catholic University of Chile, School of Engineering
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Customer value in lean prefabrication of housing considering both construction and manufacturing
2006 (English)In: Understanding and Managing the Construction Process: Theory and Practice: Proceedings of the 14th Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction / [ed] R. Sacks; S. Bertelsen, Catholic University of Chile, School of Engineering , 2006, p. 583-594Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Prefabrication increases standardisation and repetitiveness both in processes and products and yields a progress of a construction process that is more comparable to manufacturing than on-site construction. Previous research shows that house prefabrication reduces waste and resolves some of the peculiarities of construction (e.g. one-of-a-kindness, on-site production and a temporary organisation). However, the need for value creation by considering construction peculiarities in prefabrication is also discussed within the IGLC community. Hence, the aim of this research is to contribute to the understanding of how to obtain a lean prefabrication strategy, i.e., a strategy that considers both waste reduction and value generation.To find suggestions for development within value creation of a prefabrication strategy, a multiple case study of the total population of Swedish timber volume element (TVE) prefabrication, and a customer survey of 57 potential and previous real-estate trustees of the TVE building system was performed. The result shows that value generation is connected to meeting customer needs formulated within the deep-rooted culture of construction based on historical knowledge and attitudes. Traditional on-site production is still apparently perceived to allow a higher degree of control, trust and flexibility. To obtain a lean prefabrication strategy both waste reduction, through the use of manufacturing related project orientation, and consideration of the construction culture is therefore needed. Previous researches suggest flexibility, customisation and convincing design have to be met to obtain value generation and this is empirically confirmed by this research. However, the research also shows that a lean prefabrication strategy still has to meet the traditional needs of the process, as control and trust of the production process and the product, trust of the manufacturer together with information transfer, to obtain customer value. Control and trust can be supported by information transfer via strategic alliances and demonstration houses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Catholic University of Chile, School of Engineering, 2006
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-40115 (URN)f1b35640-9bf0-11db-8975-000ea68e967b (Local ID)f1b35640-9bf0-11db-8975-000ea68e967b (Archive number)f1b35640-9bf0-11db-8975-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Conference
Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction : 25/07/2006 - 27/07/2006
Note
Godkänd; 2006; 20070104 (ysko)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Höök, M. (2006). Träbyggande: Volymbyggnad (ed.). Paper presented at . Bygg & Teknik (4), 48-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Träbyggande: Volymbyggnad
2006 (Swedish)In: Bygg & Teknik, ISSN 0281-658X, no 4, p. 48-52Article in journal (Other academic) Published
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-13943 (URN)d42a03c0-a31b-11dc-8fee-000ea68e967b (Local ID)d42a03c0-a31b-11dc-8fee-000ea68e967b (Archive number)d42a03c0-a31b-11dc-8fee-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2006; 20071205 (mathoo)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Höök, M. & Stehn, L. (2005). Connecting lean construction to prefabrication complexity in Swedish volume element housing (ed.). In: (Ed.), Russell Kenley (Ed.), Proceedings: 13th Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction. Paper presented at Annual conference of the International Group for Lean Construction : 18/07/2005 - 21/07/2005 (pp. 317-325). Sydney: International group for lean construction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connecting lean construction to prefabrication complexity in Swedish volume element housing
2005 (English)In: Proceedings: 13th Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction / [ed] Russell Kenley, Sydney: International group for lean construction , 2005, p. 317-325Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Lean is about waste elimination and value creation and prefabrication of houses seems to be one way to create structure and decreased complexity and waste generated by variation. However, prefabrication decreases some types of complexity and waste but introduces other ones through new roles of the actors and a shift of focus to manufacturing. The aim of this paper is to develop an understanding of a prefabrication strategy and to show the increased need for a novel comprehension in lean construction regarding different types of prefabrication deliveries and thus different types of complexity. Complexity as such, in this paper used in a contingency context, cannot be generalized and this study explores the differences in peculiarities of on-site construction, element prefabrication and volume element prefabrication. Peculiarities in volume element prefabrication are found to consist of two connected parts; Product complexity including building element design and product design (built-in knowledge) and process complexity including internal logistics, breadth of required knowledge and integration between product and process design. The sources of complexity in volume element prefabrication are thus connected to the in-house production system, differing from on-site construction and element prefabrication peculiarities connected to fragmentation and uncertainty among actors in the value chain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sydney: International group for lean construction, 2005
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-30755 (URN)84866067448 (Scopus ID)4ae63fb0-d892-11db-a1bf-000ea68e967b (Local ID)1877040347 (ISBN)4ae63fb0-d892-11db-a1bf-000ea68e967b (Archive number)4ae63fb0-d892-11db-a1bf-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Conference
Annual conference of the International Group for Lean Construction : 18/07/2005 - 21/07/2005
Note
Godkänd; 2005; 20070322 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Höök, M. (2005). Timber volume element prefabrication: production and market aspects (ed.). (Licentiate dissertation). Paper presented at . Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Timber volume element prefabrication: production and market aspects
2005 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Problems discussed within the Swedish housing industry are lack of competition, quality and increased costs. Improvements to cope with these problems have shown to be low compared to manufacturing and other industries. Explanations are argued to be industry specific differences, peculiarities and the culture of construction, and thus implicate a need for development of innovations that can manage the peculiarities and culture of construction. The industry specific differences between manufacturing and construction also detain transfer of competitive management principles from process oriented manufacturing to project oriented construction. Timber prefabrication is argued to be a possible catalyst for improvements towards industrialization and process orientation in Swedish housing construction. The comprehensive aim of this research is therefore to develop the understanding of obstacles and feasible improvements in Swedish housing based on timber prefabrication through the investigation of timber component supplying generally and timber volume element prefabrication specifically. The study embrace one comparative multiple case study including five different material component suppliers, and investigates differences in business and market strategies for timber components suppliers compared to steel and concrete components suppliers. Secondly a multiple case study including the five leading Swedish timber volume element manufacturers are performed. The case study describes hindrance and possibilities of timber volume element production. Third, a survey of 57 possible customers of timber volume element prefabricated houses is performed to increase the understanding of the low adoption rate of timber volume element prefabrication in commercial buildings and multi-family and multi-storey housing. To support and develop the understanding of hindrances and possibilities for timber prefabrication and timber volume element prefabrication, literature studies are executed within complex system theory, innovation diffusion and adoption theory and lean and agile production. To reach the same improvements as manufacturing and to enable transfer of management principles to construction, the results in this thesis has shown a need for increased structure in construction. It is argued that timber volume element prefabrication has the possibility to increase structure and hence the building system can serve as a platform for transfer of management principles from manufacturing to construction. However, findings also demonstrate that there is a missing link for customer adoption of timber volume element prefabrication in multi-storey housing. The building system has not always the possibility to respond to customers' needs of contemporaneous flexibility in design together with low costs and short lead times. Potential customers are positive to timber volume element prefabrication for two-storey houses, but findings also suggest that adoption is prevented by a distrust of timber volume element prefabrication as a building system for multi-storey housing. To obtain increased use of timber prefabrication and thus potential development in housing, this study indicates that there is a need for increased information transfer to potential customers to obtain trust towards the timber manufacturers and the building systems. Thus, to enable adoption of innovations in housing construction that is deep-rooted in historical knowledge and attitudes, this research shows that innovation diffusion and adoption have to be supported by visual and personal experienced knowledge, e.g. via demonstration objects and strategic alliances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2005. p. 65
Series
Licentiate thesis / Luleå University of Technology, ISSN 1402-1757 ; 2005:65
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-17693 (URN)4b3b4f90-8b59-11db-8975-000ea68e967b (Local ID)4b3b4f90-8b59-11db-8975-000ea68e967b (Archive number)4b3b4f90-8b59-11db-8975-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2005; 20061214 (haneit)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Stehn, L. & Höök, M. (2004). Innovative and lean construction success factors for building systems manufacturers (ed.). In: (Ed.), Sven Bertelsen; Carlos T. Formoso (Ed.), 12th Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction: proceedings of IGLC-12 : Helsingør, Denmark, August, 3-5, 2004. Paper presented at Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction : 03/08/2004 - 05/08/2004.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovative and lean construction success factors for building systems manufacturers
2004 (English)In: 12th Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction: proceedings of IGLC-12 : Helsingør, Denmark, August, 3-5, 2004 / [ed] Sven Bertelsen; Carlos T. Formoso, 2004Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-30951 (URN)4f95d0f0-613d-11dc-ac97-000ea68e967b (Local ID)8777567323 (ISBN)4f95d0f0-613d-11dc-ac97-000ea68e967b (Archive number)4f95d0f0-613d-11dc-ac97-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Conference
Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction : 03/08/2004 - 05/08/2004
Note
Godkänd; 2004; 20070912 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
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