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Axelsson, Karin
Publications (10 of 89) Show all publications
Karlsson, E., Zingmark, K., Axelsson, K. & Sävenstedt, S. (2017). Aspects of Self and Identity in Narrations About Recent Events: Communication With Individuals With Alzheimer's Disease Enabled by a Digital Photograph Diary. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(6), 25-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aspects of Self and Identity in Narrations About Recent Events: Communication With Individuals With Alzheimer's Disease Enabled by a Digital Photograph Diary
2017 (English)In: Journal of Gerontological Nursing, ISSN 0098-9134, E-ISSN 1938-243X, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to narrate autobiographical memories is important for maintaining the identity of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The current study explored how the sense of self is manifested in narrations about recent events, enabled via a digital photograph diary. Use of a digital photograph diary was tested with seven individuals with AD and their household members. Narrative analysis was used to analyze audiorecordings of the pairs' communication about recent events shown in the photographs. The results show how individuals with AD understand events illustrated in recent photographs in relation to their sense of self and associated skills and abilities that are facets of their selfhood. This type of digital photograph diary has the potential to support individuals with AD to maintain their sense of self and participation in everyday life, and strengthen their relationships with household members; it could be an important tool in person-centered care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SLACK, 2017
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-64200 (URN)10.3928/00989134-20170126-02 (DOI)000404264400004 ()2-s2.0-85021768839 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-08-14 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-06-19 Created: 2017-06-19 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Marchesoni, M. A., Axelsson, K., Fältholm, Y. & Lindberg, I. (2017). Going from “paper and pen” to ICT systems: Perspectives on managing the change process (ed.). Informatics for Health and Social Care, 42(2), 109-121
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Going from “paper and pen” to ICT systems: Perspectives on managing the change process
2017 (English)In: Informatics for Health and Social Care, ISSN 1753-8157, E-ISSN 1753-8165, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 109-121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Lack of participation from staff when developing information and communication technologies (ICT) has been shown to lead to negative consequences and might be one explanation for failure. Management during development processes has rarely been empirically studied, especially when introducing ICT systems in a municipality context. Objective: To describe and interpret experiences of the management during change processes where ICT was introduced among staff and managers in elderly care. Design: A qualitative interpretive method was chosen for this study and content analysis for analyzing the interviews. Results: “Clear focus–unclear process” demonstrated that focus on ICT solutions was clear but the process of introducing the ICT was not. “First-line managers receiving a system of support” gave a picture of the first-line manager as not playing an active part in the projects. First-line managers and staff described “Low power to influence” when realizing that for some reasons, they had not contributed in the change projects. “Low confirmation” represented the previous and present feelings of staff not being listened to. Lastly, “Reciprocal understanding” pictures how first-line managers and staff, although having some expectations on each other, understood each other’s positions. Conclusions: Empowerment could be useful in creating an organization where critical awareness and reflection over daily practice becomes a routine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
National Category
Nursing Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Nursing; Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3525 (URN)10.3109/17538157.2015.1033526 (DOI)000396842500001 ()27715360 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84990181464 (Scopus ID)15a306be-9c6d-4757-9d68-a682e234889b (Local ID)15a306be-9c6d-4757-9d68-a682e234889b (Archive number)15a306be-9c6d-4757-9d68-a682e234889b (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-03-20 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-11-15Bibliographically approved
Andersson Marchesoni, M., Axelsson, K., Fältholm, Y. & Lindberg, I. (2017). Technologies in older people's care: Values related to a caring rationality. Nursing Ethics, 24(2), 125-137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technologies in older people's care: Values related to a caring rationality
2017 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 125-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUNDThe tension between care-based and technology-based rationalities motivates studies concerning how technology can be used in the care sector to support the relational foundation of care.OBJECTIVESThis study interprets values related to care and technologies connected to the practice of good care.RESEARCH DESIGNThis research study was part of a development project aimed at developing innovative work practices through information and communication technology. Participants and research context: All staff (n = 18) working at two wards in a care facility for older people were asked to participate in interviews, and 12 accepted. We analysed the data using latent content analysis in combination with normative analysis. Ethical considerations: The caregivers were informed that participation was voluntary and that they could drop out at any time without providing any explanation.FINDINGSFour values were identified: 'presence', 'appreciation', 'competence' and 'trust'. Caregivers wanted to focus on care receivers as unique persons, a view that they thought was compromised by time-consuming and beeping electronic devices. Appraising from next-of-kin and been seen as someone who can contribute together with knowledge to handle different situations were other desires. The caregivers also desired positive feedback from next-of-kin, as they wanted to be seen as professionals who have the knowledge and skills to handle difficult situations. In addition, the caregivers wanted their employer to trust them, and they wanted to work in a calm environment.DISCUSSIONCaregivers' desire for disturbance-free interactions, being valued for their skills and working in a trustful working environment were interpreted as their base for providing good care. The caregivers' arguments are based on caring rationality, and sometimes they felt the technological rationality interfered with their main mission, providing quality care.CONCLUSIONIntroducing new technology in caring should support the caring relationship. Although society's overall technology-based approach may have gained popularity as a problem solver, technology-based rationality may compromise a care-based rationality. A shift in attitudes towards care as a concept on all societal levels is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Nursing Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Nursing; Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62879 (URN)10.1177/0969733015594665 (DOI)000397917600002 ()26208722 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018787031 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-04-04 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-04-04 Created: 2017-04-04 Last updated: 2018-11-15Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, S., Vikman, I., Axelsson, K. & Sävenstedt, S. (2015). Self-care for minor illness (ed.). Paper presented at . Primary Health Care Research and Development, 16(1), 71-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care for minor illness
2015 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe experiences with and knowledge of minor illness, self-care interventions used in minor illness and channels of information used when providing self-care for minor illness.Background: Although minor illness is self-limiting, symptoms can be substantial and have a great impact on the affected person’s wellbeing. Possibilities to seek and find information about health and self-care have significantly increased through internet-based communities, forums, and websites. Still, a considerable number of consultations with general practitioners are for conditions that are potentially self-treatable. Seeking advanced care for minor illnesses is costly for society and can create discomfort for patients as they are down-prioritized at emergency departments.Methods: Study participants were recruited randomly from the Swedish Adress Register. A questionnaire was sent out, and the final sample included 317 randomly selected persons aged 18–80 and living in Sweden.Findings: Having experienced a specific illness correlated with self-reported knowledge. Preferred self-care interventions differed between different conditions, but resting and self-medicating were commonly used, along with consulting health care facilities. Compliance to advice was the highest for official information channels, and family members were a popular source of advice.

National Category
Nursing Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3738 (URN)10.1017/S1463423613000522 (DOI)000369919100010 ()24451047 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84973426683 (Scopus ID)1921c3e7-d591-4ac6-bf97-0718bc662fca (Local ID)1921c3e7-d591-4ac6-bf97-0718bc662fca (Archive number)1921c3e7-d591-4ac6-bf97-0718bc662fca (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 1; 20140128 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, E., Axelsson, K., Zingmark, K., Fahlander, K. & Sävenstedt, S. (2014). "Carpe Diem": Supporting conversations between individuals with dementia and their family members (ed.). Paper presented at . Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 40(2), 38-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Carpe Diem": Supporting conversations between individuals with dementia and their family members
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Gerontological Nursing, ISSN 0098-9134, E-ISSN 1938-243X, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 38-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Remembrance of recent events is a major problem for individuals with dementia. Consequently, this article explores the process of acceptance and integration of a digital photograph diary (DPD) as a tool for remembrance of and conversations about daily life events. A design for multiple case studies was used. Seven couples, in which one individual in the couple had Alzheimer's disease, tested the DPD for 6 months. Data were collected in three sequences with interviews, observations, and screening instruments. In the analysis, all data were integrated to find common patterns of content. Some couples became regular users, while others used the DPD more sporadically. Factors contributing to regular use were how the DPD matched expectations, actual use, support, experienced usefulness, and reactions from family and friends. For those couples who became regular users, the DPD facilitated their conversation about recent daily activities

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3668 (URN)17b8c763-7e58-448c-87e6-dc8687a7dec3 (Local ID)17b8c763-7e58-448c-87e6-dc8687a7dec3 (Archive number)17b8c763-7e58-448c-87e6-dc8687a7dec3 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140304 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-02-07Bibliographically approved
Marchesoni, M. A., Axelsson, K. & Lindberg, I. (2014). Digital support for medication administration: a means for reaching the goal of providing good care? (ed.). Paper presented at . Journal of Health Organisation & Management, 28(3), 327-343
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital support for medication administration: a means for reaching the goal of providing good care?
2014 (English)In: Journal of Health Organisation & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 327-343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - To describe staffs’ perceptions of digital support for medication administration (DSM) and out of the perceptions interpret underlying values. Design/methodology/approach - Twenty-two persons working in elder-care participated in the study. The study had a qualitative approach and focus-group interviews were used to collect data. To analyze the manifest content a phenomenographic method was used. An interpretation of perceptions was then undertaken aimed at identifying underlying values. Findings - Three descriptive categories, "Utility", "Impact on working environment" and "Economic impact" were the result of the manifest analysis. The values of having a "Good working environment", "Benefits" and "Good economy" were interpreted as guidance for staffs’ acceptance or rejection of the DSM.Originality/value - This study had a twofold approach with the intention of going beyond descriptions. To gain a deeper understanding a normative interpretation was completed. Ethical conflicts are frequently characterized as conflicts between at least two values. In this study staffs expressed fear of losing prerequisites needed to perform their work well. Prerequisites that were identified as values and these values were threatened by the DSM

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12856 (URN)10.1108/JHOM-11-2012-0222 (DOI)000209891200003 ()2-s2.0-84907067606 (Scopus ID)c0110c95-fa60-4452-b81a-bedd1c2db8ad (Local ID)c0110c95-fa60-4452-b81a-bedd1c2db8ad (Archive number)c0110c95-fa60-4452-b81a-bedd1c2db8ad (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20130918 (marand)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, E., Sävenstedt, S., Axelsson, K. & Zingmark, K. (2014). Stories about life narrated by people with Alzheimer's disease (ed.). Paper presented at . Journal of Advanced Nursing, 70(12), 2791-2799
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stories about life narrated by people with Alzheimer's disease
2014 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 70, no 12, p. 2791-2799Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimTo explore how people with Alzheimer's disease present their life story.BackgroundLife story work is a key concept in a person-centred care. An important aspect in understanding the subjective experience and supporting the identity of people with dementia is to listen to their life stories.DesignA narrative design with interviews was used.MethodNine participants with Alzheimer's disease were encouraged to tell about their lives from childhood, adult life, to present life and about their thoughts on the future. The interviews were conducted between September 2010–March 2011 in the participants' homes, with their spouses present and were analysed with a method for analysis of narratives.FindingsContentment, Connectedness, Self-reliance and Personal growth were identified as core dimensions in the participants' life stories and shown like threads throughout life, from childhood, adult life to present life. All participants expressed an overall contentment with life, and connectedness was related to their relation with significant persons and to be included in the local community. Self-reliance was expressed as a strong confidence in the own ability and an overall curiosity throughout life as a sustained quest for personal growth.ConclusionsIt is important for healthcare professionals, who work with people with dementia, to understand that people with Alzheimer's disease can maintain an overall trusting and hopeful approach to life. It is also important to use life story work to enhance feelings of being connected to the world and thereby support their identity and sense of self.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8084 (URN)10.1111/jan.12429 (DOI)000344851300010 ()24766325 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84909644410 (Scopus ID)6862ae57-3691-4a4c-ad83-fed3cd4366c7 (Local ID)6862ae57-3691-4a4c-ad83-fed3cd4366c7 (Archive number)6862ae57-3691-4a4c-ad83-fed3cd4366c7 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140502 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Wälivaara, B.-M., Sävenstedt, S. & Axelsson, K. (2013). Caring relationships in home-based nursing care: registered nurse's experiences (ed.). Paper presented at . Open Nursing Journal, 7, 89-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring relationships in home-based nursing care: registered nurse's experiences
2013 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 7, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person's genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses' experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person's position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14628 (URN)10.2174/1874434620130516003 (DOI)23894261 (PubMedID)e07571d8-733e-4d94-b544-e0ffa041de96 (Local ID)e07571d8-733e-4d94-b544-e0ffa041de96 (Archive number)e07571d8-733e-4d94-b544-e0ffa041de96 (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2013; 20121213 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M., Lindberg, I., Fältholm, Y. & Axelsson, K. (2013). Digital support for medication administration: Status-enhancing innovation for care workers? (ed.). Paper presented at Equality, Growth and Innovation - In Theory and Practice : 09/10/2013 - 10/10/2013. Paper presented at Equality, Growth and Innovation - In Theory and Practice : 09/10/2013 - 10/10/2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital support for medication administration: Status-enhancing innovation for care workers?
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: There are assumptions that innovative ICT solutions in healthcare can improve the efficiency and contribute to increased quality. Innovation through ICT is also expected to increase status of and attract men to care work.A project aimed at finding innovative ICT solutions was realized between 2009 and 2012. The project involved a healthcare center and two nursing homes. Technicians (all men) were those in the project given the assignment of finding innovative solutions together with staff. Involved in the project were also ICT companies and academic researchers. This research study was undertaken in a nursing home context. A tool for medication administration was under development and to be tested.Purpose; to describe staff’s perceptions of digital support for medication administration and understand staff’s underlying values when arguing for or against the tool.Data collection; focus-group interviews were carried out to collect data. To analyze and interpret the content of the data, a phenomenographic method was used.Findings; Participants questioned the utility and also the need of the ICT solution. Participants also expressed a risk for impaired working environment as an effect of the tool. They also thought the tool would be complicated to use and sometimes would lack in performance. Increased status as an effect of introducing ICT was a belief that was not held by the staff.Conclusions; Setting aside the fact that from the perspective of an outsider, the intention of the project was indeed to do good , staff did not perceive the ICT solution in a positive manner. Politicians and policymakers may be over emphasizing the possibilities of ICT for solving future challenges in healthcare. Focus on technological innovations and a discourse in which care workers are excluded can actually be contra-productive to the possibilities of enhancing the status of care work, which is still predominantly performed by women

National Category
Nursing Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Nursing; Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-29405 (URN)2e066bda-995f-41eb-ad39-c47f8ff1bffd (Local ID)2e066bda-995f-41eb-ad39-c47f8ff1bffd (Archive number)2e066bda-995f-41eb-ad39-c47f8ff1bffd (OAI)
Conference
Equality, Growth and Innovation - In Theory and Practice : 09/10/2013 - 10/10/2013
Note
Godkänd; 2013; 20130918 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-02-13Bibliographically approved
Wälivaara, B.-M., Sävenstedt, S. & Axelsson, K. (2013). Encounters in home-based nursing care: registered nurses' experiences (ed.). Paper presented at . Open Nursing Journal, 7(1), 73-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Encounters in home-based nursing care: registered nurses' experiences
2013 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 73-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The encounter between registered nurses and persons in need of healthcare has been described as fundamental in nursing care. This encounter can take place face-to-face in physical meetings and through meetings via distance-spanning technology. A strong view expressed in the literature is that the face-to-face encounter is important and cannot entirely be replaced by remote encounters. The encounter has been studied in various healthcare contexts but there is a lack of studies with specific focus on the encounter in home-based nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the encounter in home-based nursing care based on registered nurses' experiences. Individual interviews were performed with 24 nurses working in home-based nursing care. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis and six themes were identified: Follows special rules, Needs some doing, Provides unique information and understanding, Facilitates by being known, Brings energy and relieves anxiety, and Can reach a spirit of community. The encounter includes dimensions of being private, being personal and being professional. A good encounter contains dimensions of being personal and being professional and that there is a good balance between these. This is an encounter between two human beings, where the nurse faces the person with herself and the profession steadily and securely in the back. Being personal and professional at the same time could encourage nurses to focus on doing and being during the encounter in home-based nursing care.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14820 (URN)10.2174/1874434620130419001 (DOI)23847697 (PubMedID)e3e05bb5-2546-46a7-9f7c-79517badf277 (Local ID)e3e05bb5-2546-46a7-9f7c-79517badf277 (Archive number)e3e05bb5-2546-46a7-9f7c-79517badf277 (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2013; 20121213 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
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