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Meiling, John
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Lundkvist, R., Meiling, J. & Sandberg, M. (2014). A proactive plan-do-check-act approach to defect management based on a Swedish construction project (ed.). Paper presented at . Construction Management and Economics, 32(11), 1051-1065
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A proactive plan-do-check-act approach to defect management based on a Swedish construction project
2014 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1051-1065Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to continuously improve quality and avoid reoccurrence of defects, defect management (DM) in construction needs to take a more proactive approach. The classification of construction information is important for the efficient exchange and integration of data between the many roles and phases of construction and facility management, but it also provides a framework for standardization, which in turn is paramount for improvement. In order to better understand how defects can be managed proactively we conducted a case study on inspection practices at a large construction project in Sweden, using observation and analysis of inspection reports. We identified opportunities and obstacles in the classification of defect data. The project’s defect descriptions were often ambiguous and the records lacked important contextual information. We believe that this was because current practice is not designed with proactivity in mind, and there are only regulatory requirements on the data, making classification difficult. In addition, by viewing the project’s practices through the lenses of continuous improvement and plan-do-check-act theory to identify missing or inadequate steps, we propose a framework for a proactive version of the current defect management process that could potentially help to prioritize improvement work and reduce the incidence of defects

Keywords
Building defects, Classification, Continuous Improvement, Inspection, Quality Management, Civil engineering and architecture - Building manufacturing engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Byggproduktionsteknik
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10184 (URN)10.1080/01446193.2014.966733 (DOI)2-s2.0-84908134760 (Scopus ID)8f12f5f8-ab48-4a80-826f-0c9afc0c0ca2 (Local ID)8f12f5f8-ab48-4a80-826f-0c9afc0c0ca2 (Archive number)8f12f5f8-ab48-4a80-826f-0c9afc0c0ca2 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140926 (marsan)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Meiling, J., Sandberg, M. & Johnsson, H. (2014). A study of a plan-do-check-act method used in less industrialized activities: two cases from industrialized housebuilding (ed.). Paper presented at . Construction Management and Economics, 32(1-2), 109-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A study of a plan-do-check-act method used in less industrialized activities: two cases from industrialized housebuilding
2014 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 32, no 1-2, p. 109-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In construction projects, a large number of deviations are usually found during inspections and adjusted in a reactive manner. For projects to become proactive, root causes need to be identified and eliminated as a part of a process of continuous improvement (CI). Plan-do-check-act (PDCA) methods are part of CI and have been used with success within the manufacturing industry for decades. Research studies of PDCA in construction are less common, which could be explained by the past dominance of the project-based nature of construction compared to the process-based nature of manufacture. Industrialized construction, however, has changed this picture somewhat, and it is of interest to find out how well it works for less industrialized activities in construction. A PDCA method was tested in two cases selected from one medium-sized Swedish industrialized housebuilder, which uses a building system based on offsite manufactured modules. Empirical results are based on systematic data gathered through interviews and participant observations. Results from the two cases show that the PDCA method worked even when processes were divided into industrialized parts within a factory and non-industrial parts at the construction site although this might lead to temporary corrective actions rather than permanent process actions

National Category
Construction Management Building Technologies
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management; Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12872 (URN)10.1080/01446193.2013.812227 (DOI)2-s2.0-84896521963 (Scopus ID)c04cd708-99f9-4cf0-8b2a-40bf3a68f860 (Local ID)c04cd708-99f9-4cf0-8b2a-40bf3a68f860 (Archive number)c04cd708-99f9-4cf0-8b2a-40bf3a68f860 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20130123 (marsan)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Meiling, J., Backlund, F. & Johnsson, H. (2012). Managing for continuous improvement in off-site construction: Evaluation of lean management principles (ed.). Paper presented at . Engineering Construction and Architectural Management, 19(2), 141-158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing for continuous improvement in off-site construction: Evaluation of lean management principles
2012 (English)In: Engineering Construction and Architectural Management, ISSN 0969-9988, E-ISSN 1365-232X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 141-158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – Several off-site manufacturing companies in Sweden have attempted to apply lean management to improve process effectiveness and efficiency. A state of continuous improvement is a key goal of lean management, as described in, e.g. Likers 4P model. The aim of this study is to test a method to measure the degree to which lean management principles have been adopted by companies that base their production on off-site manufacturing, as a prerequisite for a sustainable approach to continuous improvement. Design/methodology/approach – A survey is applied as research method, using a questionnaire based on the authors' perceptions of best practices corresponding to each lean management principle. Two questionnaires were distributed to both management and factory production personnel in two off-site manufacturing firms in Sweden. Findings – The Likert scores regarding the degree to which lean principles have been applied in the two studied companies showed similar patterns (and similar differences between the management and production personnel's responses), indicating that the results can be generalised within an off-site construction context. The study shows that continuous improvements must emerge and evolve simultaneously with a focus on processes, people and long-term thinking. Research limitations/implications – In order to obtain more generalised and detailed results a more extensive survey covering several companies, as well as more detailed case studies and more questions regarding each principle, are needed. A multivariate analysis will also scan the material for further dependences. Originality/value – The paper highlights several aspects that are important for management to be aware of when aiming for continuous improvements in off-site manufacturing.

National Category
Construction Management Reliability and Maintenance Building Technologies
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management; Quality Technology and Management; Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7119 (URN)10.1108/09699981211206089 (DOI)2-s2.0-84857752097 (Scopus ID)56f7d332-2580-4889-8c71-6ecb13abd329 (Local ID)56f7d332-2580-4889-8c71-6ecb13abd329 (Archive number)56f7d332-2580-4889-8c71-6ecb13abd329 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120307 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Meiling, J., Lundkvist, R. & Magnusson, O. (2011). Erfarenhetsåterföring: Dags för klargörande, omtag och nya nivåer (ed.). Paper presented at . Samhällsbyggaren, 2011(2), pp. 16-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Erfarenhetsåterföring: Dags för klargörande, omtag och nya nivåer
2011 (Swedish)In: Samhällsbyggaren, ISSN 2000-2408, Vol. 2011, no 2, p. 16-21Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Vad är egentligen erfarenhetsåterförign? Begreppet är väl använt men innebörden är oklar- Vi slänger oss med detta begrepp och upprepar det som ett mantra i hopp om att vi ska komma till jobbet en dag och då ha tillgång till allt vi och våra kollegor någonsin har lärt oss. Tyvärr räcker det inte med önskningar, utan detta är något som i allra högsta grad kräver långsiktigt engagemang, hårt arbete och ett stort mått av uthållighet och öppna sinnen.

Keywords
Civil engineering and architecture - Building manufacturing engineering, Erfarenhetsåterföring, Experience feedback, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Byggproduktionsteknik
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4107 (URN)1fab9f86-bbf9-45f9-988a-3ee64e928e7e (Local ID)1fab9f86-bbf9-45f9-988a-3ee64e928e7e (Archive number)1fab9f86-bbf9-45f9-988a-3ee64e928e7e (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2011; 20110809 (roblun)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-05-24Bibliographically approved
Lundkvist, R. & Meiling, J. (2011). Towards an experience feedback system from building inspections through classification of construction works (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), Proceedings of the CIB W78-W102 2011: International Conference: . Paper presented at International Conference CIB W78-W102 2011 : 26/10/2011 - 28/10/2011. : ArCiBel Editores
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards an experience feedback system from building inspections through classification of construction works
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the CIB W78-W102 2011: International Conference, ArCiBel Editores, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Different studies on the construction industry have shown that new buildings are produced with a large number of defects. The common practice in the industry to deal with defects is in a reactive way, i.e. to wait for the final inspection, rectify and then move on to the next project. There are competitive incentives for companies to learn from mistakes, i.e. through Experience Feedback, although the peculiarities of project-based organizations make these activities difficult. These difficulties might frighten companies from investing in new and complex feedback activities. We suggest that the information about defects from Final Inspections could be a way towards Experience Feedback, when the inspections are mandatory and therefore already entrenched in the industry. Taking this as a starting-point, this paper aims at evaluating the generation of defects information from final inspections of a large conference centre project and to present and discuss the results through the lens of Classification and System theory. The paper will show what kind of information that can be drawn from a current de facto ‘best practice’ of Final Inspection report in Sweden. It is suggested that the quality of defects information can be enhanced by classification of data with a suitable object classification system for construction work, such as the Swedish BSAB system. Eventually, the horizon of future research is discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ArCiBel Editores, 2011
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-29459 (URN)2f29235e-8023-4c4f-bbf5-2e0de8b071d9 (Local ID)2f29235e-8023-4c4f-bbf5-2e0de8b071d9 (Archive number)2f29235e-8023-4c4f-bbf5-2e0de8b071d9 (OAI)
Conference
International Conference CIB W78-W102 2011 : 26/10/2011 - 28/10/2011
Note
Godkänd; 2012; 20120201 (roblun)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-05-24Bibliographically approved
Meiling, J. (2010). Continuous improvement and experience feedback in off-site construction: timber-framed module prefabrication (ed.). (Doctoral dissertation). Paper presented at . Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuous improvement and experience feedback in off-site construction: timber-framed module prefabrication
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Continuous improvement implies an incremental, ongoing effort to improve products, services or processes. Some construction companies have chosen to face competition by adopting an off-site construction strategy, one form of which is timber-framed module prefabrication. These housebuilders strive to transform their activities from conventional, loosely controlled construction into tightly controlled, continuously improved production processes.The rationale for developing and implementing methods for continuous improvement is well documented. Regardless of the choice of production strategy common denominators are needs to recognise problems and a continuous quality improvement program that incorporates learning from mistakes and success. There is greater scope for such experience feedback in off-site module manufacturing than in on-site construction, because there are higher levels of repetition and process control. The purpose of adopting a continuous improvement strategy is to create knowledge that results in improvements aligned with company vision and goals. This thesis presents and discusses a series of studies intended to elucidate the role and status of continuous improvement in Swedish off-site construction. Quantitative and qualitative data have been gathered in six studies of timber-framed module prefabrication companies: three multiple case studies, two questionnaire-based surveys, and one archival analysis. The six studies have investigated building inspection defects, current practice of experience feedback, application of stepwise problemsolving, and Lean management in an off-site construction context. The results show that application of a continuous improvement strategy through stepwise problem solving enables pull for experience feedback in the studied companies. Furthermore, stepwise problem solving can reduce defects, enhance learning and target accuracy when solving problems in module prefabrication. The investigated problems acted as vehicles for experience feedback for both internal and external customers, in a feedback generating loop. Communication was improved as it was demanded by the problem-solving activity. Further work is needed to understand how continuous improvements and the stepwise problem solving methodology could be fully implemented and integrated in working processes in the off-site construction context, in terms of supporting leadership, ensuring availability of resources, building trust among employees, providing challenging work and thus attaining sustainable quality advantages in contrast to short-term benefits. In addition, a sufficient level of standardisation must be applied in off-site construction to gain the benefits of systematic problem solving.

Abstract [sv]

Konceptet ständiga förbättringar innebär många små förbättringar av ett företags produkter, tjänster och processer. Några svenska byggföretag har valt att möta konkurrensen på husbyggnadsmarknaden genom att tillämpa prefabriceringsstrategier, så kallat industriellt byggande, för tillverkning av flerfamiljshus. En av dessa industriella strategier är modultillverkning med trästomme. De företag som tillämpar denna strategi söker omvandla konventionell husbyggnadsteknik, med låg produktionskontroll, till industriell linjeproduktion med tillämpning av ständiga förbättringar.Motiven för att införa och tillämpa metoder för ständiga förbättringar är väl underbyggda. Oavsett vilken produktionsform som tillämpas innebär införandet av ständiga förbättringar införandet av ett kvalitetstänkande där problem ses som möjligheter till förbättring. Detta synsätt inbegriper att dra lärdom av fel och misstag genom erfarenhetsåterföring och systematisk problemlösning. Prefabricering av moduler inbegriper en högre grad av processkontroll och repetitiva arbeten än traditionell platsbyggnadsteknik, vilket gör dem mer mottagliga för erfarenhetsåterföring. Motivet för att arbeta med ständiga förbättringar är att generera ny kunskap som kan omsättas till förbättringar som svarar mot ett företags långsiktiga visioner och mål. Denna avhandling presenterar undersökningar som syftar till att beskriva hur ständiga förbättringar kan tillämpas inom industriellt byggande i Sverige.Kvantitativa och kvalitativa data har samlats i sex studier utförda på företag som tillverkar prefabricerade moduler med trästomme: tre multipla fallstudier, två enkätbaserade studier, och en arkivbaserad analysstudie. De sex studierna har undersökt felnoteringar från byggbesiktningar, tillämpningen av erfarenhetsåterföring, stegvis problemlösning, och Leant ledarskap inom industriellt byggande.Resultaten visar att tillämpning av ständiga förbättringar och stegvis problemlösning medför ett dragande system för erfarenhetsåterföring. Det innebär också att antalet fel kan minskas, medan lärandet och precisionen i problemlösningen kan ökas. Problemen som undersöktes i fallstudierna var bärare av erfarenheter från externa och interna kunder. Kommunikationen förbättrades eftersom det inbegrips i de aktiviteter som följer av problemlösningen.Mera forskning behövs för att till fullo förstå hur ständiga förbättringar och stegvis problemlösning kan införas och integreras i industriellt byggande. Flera faktorer påverkar hur man kan uppnå långsiktig framgång med detta arbete: stödjande ledarskap, resurstilldelning, förtroende bland medarbetarna och en upplevelse av utmaning i arbetet. Ständiga förbättringar är starkt beroende av standardiserat arbete, där graden av standardisering bör utforskas bättre.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2010. p. 121
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
National Category
Building Technologies Construction Management
Research subject
Timber Structures; Construction Engineering and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-18178 (URN)74f76e50-f08a-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (Local ID)978-91-7439-180-0 (ISBN)74f76e50-f08a-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (Archive number)74f76e50-f08a-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2010; 20101115 (johmei); DISPUTATION Ämnesområde: Träbyggnad/Timber Structures Opponent: PhD Micke Oostra, TNO Delft, Nederländerna Ordförande: Docent Helena Johnsson, Luleå tekniska universitet Tid: Fredag den 17 december 2010, kl 10.00 Plats: F1031, Luleå tekniska universitetAvailable from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Lundkvist, R., Meiling, J. & Vennström, A. (2010). Digitalization of inspection data: a means for enhancing learning and continuous improvements? (ed.). In: (Ed.), Charles O. Egbu; Eric Lou (Ed.), ARCOM twenty-Sixth Annual Conference 2010, September 6-8, Leeds: . Paper presented at Annual ARCOM Conference : 06/09/2010 - 08/09/2010 (pp. 829-838). Reading: Association of Researchers in Construction Management, 2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digitalization of inspection data: a means for enhancing learning and continuous improvements?
2010 (English)In: ARCOM twenty-Sixth Annual Conference 2010, September 6-8, Leeds / [ed] Charles O. Egbu; Eric Lou, Reading: Association of Researchers in Construction Management , 2010, Vol. 2, p. 829-838Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

According to Total Quality Management (TQM), Lean Production and Six Sigma literature, companies should develop organisational arrangements that foster learning from experience and base decisions on facts, since continuous improvements require continuous experience feedback in some form. In Sweden every construction project is checked in several inspections, and data about defects are collected in paper-based “punch lists”, but what happens to these data after the defects have been corrected and the building is delivered to the client? This study describes the current inspection regime in terms of the scope it provides for collecting experience feedback in the Swedish construction industry, and evaluates the extent to which Swedish construction companies recognise this scope. Empirically, it is based on a survey of the views of field superintendents in medium-sized to large building/construction contractors regarding the use of inspection data as a source of experience feedback in their respective companies. The results show that contractors are generally aware that inspection data can provide valuable information for experience feedback and constant improvements, but currently they do not have systems or processes for feeding back experience from inspections. The possibility of replacing paper-based punch lists with a digital system to process and access inspection data is discussed, which it is proposed could provide a means for improving organisational experience feedback-based learning among construction contractors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reading: Association of Researchers in Construction Management, 2010
Keywords
Civil engineering and architecture - Building manufacturing engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Byggproduktionsteknik
National Category
Construction Management Building Technologies
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management; Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-39150 (URN)dc8d4710-c0c9-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (Local ID)0-9552390-4-4 (ISBN)dc8d4710-c0c9-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (Archive number)dc8d4710-c0c9-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Conference
Annual ARCOM Conference : 06/09/2010 - 08/09/2010
Note
Godkänd; 2010; Bibliografisk uppgift: The ’Paul Townsend’ Commemorative Award; 20100915 (roblun)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-05-24Bibliographically approved
Lundkvist, R. & Meiling, J. (2010). Förbättringsarbete genom erfarenhetsåterföring inom byggentreprenadföretag: Resultat från en webbaserad enkät (ed.). Paper presented at . Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Förbättringsarbete genom erfarenhetsåterföring inom byggentreprenadföretag: Resultat från en webbaserad enkät
2010 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Alternative title[en]
Improvement Work through Experience Feedback within Construction Contractor Companies : A survey study
Abstract [sv]

Denna rapport redovisar resultaten av en enkätundersökning på svenska byggentreprenörer, som genomfördes februari-september 2010. Undersökningen skulle besvara hur de svenska byggentreprenörerna använder olika former av erfarenhetsåterföring, och i vilken utsträckning. Enkäten bestod av 23 frågor av olika form och täckte områdena kvalitetssystem, erfarenhetsmöten, entreprenadbesiktningar samt förbättringsförslag. Resultaten rörande besiktningar har tidigare publicerats i Lundkvist, Meiling och Vennström (2010), som visade att entreprenörer gärna ser besiktningsanmärkningar som en värdefull källa till kunskap, men att de saknar system som stödjer hanteringen av alla anmärkningar och ett vidare användande av statistiken. De andra frågegrupperna är ännu ej analyserade och fler publiceringar av resultat kommer att ske framgent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2010. p. 31
Series
Technical report / Luleå University of Technology, ISSN 1402-1536
Keywords
Civil engineering and architecture - Building manufacturing engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Byggproduktionsteknik
National Category
Construction Management Building Technologies
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management; Timber Structures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-25437 (URN)f328a5c0-ecb4-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (Local ID)978-91-7439-175-6 (ISBN)f328a5c0-ecb4-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (Archive number)f328a5c0-ecb4-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2010; 20101110 (roblun)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-05-24Bibliographically approved
Erikshammar, J., Meiling, J., Jansson, G. & Levander, E. (2010). Industriellt träbyggande förenar ekonomi och byggbarhet (ed.). Paper presented at . Samhällsbyggaren (2), 32-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industriellt träbyggande förenar ekonomi och byggbarhet
2010 (Swedish)In: Samhällsbyggaren, ISSN 2000-2408, no 2, p. 32-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

Industrialized Timber Housing is based on repetition of the predefined building processes compared with traditional building where the business transaction and the customer are arranged into unique projects. Since the construction process consists of recurring activities, the industrial methods do not only improve the design and production phase, but the positive impact stretches well into the management phase. The market today can be offered cost-effective housing, with higher flexibility and better quality if the client, contractor and supplier takes control of the construction process.

Abstract [sv]

Industriellt träbyggande baseras på en återupprepning av givna byggprocesser jämfört med traditionellt byggande där affären och kunden ordnas in i unika projekt. Eftersom byggprocessen består av återkommande aktiviteter kan de industriella metoderna förbättra inte bara projektering och produktion, utan de positiva effekterna stäcker sig ända in i förvaltningsfasen. Marknaden kan redan idag erbjudas kostnadseffektivare bostäder, med högre flexibilitet och bättre kvalitet genom att beställaren, entreprenören och leverantören tar kontroll över byggprocessen.

Keywords
Civil engineering and architecture - Building manufacturing engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Byggproduktionsteknik
National Category
Building Technologies Construction Management
Research subject
Timber Structures; Construction Engineering and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14142 (URN)d7a31f90-4ea0-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (Local ID)d7a31f90-4ea0-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (Archive number)d7a31f90-4ea0-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Projects
TräIN
Note
Godkänd; 2010; 20100423 (jarkko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Olofsson, T., Schade, J., Meiling, J., Heikkilä, K., Dehllin, S., Benning, P., . . . Hirvonen, T. (2010). The InPro Lifecycle Design Framework for Buildings (ed.). Paper presented at .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The InPro Lifecycle Design Framework for Buildings
Show others...
2010 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

On average, by the time 1% of project costs are spent, roughly 70% of the lifecycle costof the building has been committed indicating that benefits of integration are largest inthe early phases of a project. The building shape, selected materials, structural system,internal room distribution, and building services systems are some of the most importantfactors that influence the costs of operation and upgrading throughout the lifecycle.The main goal of the InPro project is to shift focus from the detail design to the earlyphase where the majority of the decisions are taken that influence the total performanceof the building. Therefore, the work in task 2.4 has been aimed at developing an integratedformalized iterative lifecycle design where project goals can be matched againstkey performance indictors (KPI:s) in the design process. The methodology used is acombination of literature reviews; interviews with clients, contractors and energy consultants;the participants own experience; workshops and project meetings within theInPro consortium and the development of demonstration scenarios.The building life cycle treated in this report has been limited to the early design includingmainly the operational aspects on costs and environment. The effect of repair, replacementand demolishing has not been treated.The result of task 2.4 is the InPro life cycle design framework consisting of: The InPro Smart decision making where project goals and functional needs aremapped to building performance requirements. The InPro stage/gate design where the information maturity is adapted to theproject specific decision making process. The InPro lifecycle maturity levels to guide the project management using theInPro design framework. Change management procedures are applied on approvedmaturity levels in the Open Information Platform (OIP). The InPro workflow process between two decision quality gates containing performancerequirement processing, developing a design strategy, concurrentdesign and analysis process and information quality assurance.The InPro early design framework is demonstrated in three design scenarios with focuson energy performance, environmental assessment and operation.The following recommendations are made regarding the investigated life cycle aspect: Analysis of energy and indoor climate related KPI:s and comparison with performancerequirements can be made when the OIP maturity is such that indoorclimate simulation is possible to perform on room level. Energy performance analyses should be conducted before the structural andHVAC system design is finalized since the result will guide the structural andbuilding service designer in the selection of structural system, the buildingshell and the HVAC system. Training and commitment of the end users are also needed to motivate changetowards a more sustainability and energy saving behaviour of the users byproviding feedback and user-friendly control of building installations. The procedure for environmental evaluation is based on the LCA method andcomplemented with a check of the occurrence of hazardous chemical substances. Requirements on environmental performance should be clearly defined foreach project with respect to the client’s values.Report – The InPro Lifecycle Design Framework for Buildings ■ January 2010 6/164 Objects in the models need to be complemented with information that can belinked to cost information in building parts libraries to speed-up the cost estimationsprocess. However, the model based cost estimation covers only a partof the total Life Cycle Cost and need to be complemented with other investmentsand operational aspects not directly linked to the models.The following important actors/roles/competences have been identified in the earlystages of the InPro Life Cycle design framework: It is recommended that the client is actively involved not only via briefing sessionand decision-making at decision making quality gates, but also in the designthrough the open information platform giving access to monitor and interactdirectly with the design team throughout the design process. Energy and environmental analyst should actively take part in the design process,given the opportunity to affect the building design in the early phases of aproject. This will guide architects, structural engineers and HVAC designers ina more sustainable direction. The Facility and Maintenance specialist plays an important role bridging thegap between design and construction and operations. Their knowledge and experienceprovide valuable contribution in the early design process of a buildingslife cycle performance. A new role as project information manager is proposed handling model aggregationand the quality assurance of the information stored in the OIP. In a shared information environment like InPro the responsible and risk involvedwith quantity surveying must be resolved. It is suggested that onerole/actor is dedicated to the responsibility of quantity surveying and to updatequantities in the OIP when new design models are created or changed. Towork well, the risk as well as the quantity information needs to be sharedamong project participants.Regarding the implementation of the InPro Life Cycle framework the following steps arerecommended: The visualisation step: The participating organisation need to be trained inmodel based working routines where different design disciplines 3D models areaggregated in digital mock-ups. Gains in clarification of project objectives forstakeholders and resolving of coordination issues between different design disciplinescan justify the relative inexpensive investments made on project level. The integration step rely on computer based methods to exchange data amongdifferent modelling and analysis application either using standard formats suchas IFC (International Foundation Classes) or propriety formats. Lessons fromthe manufacturing domain has shown that an integrated concurrent engineeringdesign process need to be stage/gated and supported by central repositoryof shared information under change management control. The integration stepwill be more expensive to implement and requires long term relations betweenparticipating organisations (over several projects).

Publisher
p. 164
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-24328 (URN)a82a7a3f-c5b0-4207-93ee-0364d68b6a7e (Local ID)a82a7a3f-c5b0-4207-93ee-0364d68b6a7e (Archive number)a82a7a3f-c5b0-4207-93ee-0364d68b6a7e (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2010; 20111221 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
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