Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Ericsson, Magnus
Publications (10 of 47) Show all publications
Ericsson, M. (2019). Introduction. Mineral Economics, 32(2), 127-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2019 (English)In: Mineral Economics, ISSN 2191-2203, E-ISSN 2191-2211, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 127-129Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75266 (URN)10.1007/s13563-019-00194-3 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067839456 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Löf, A., Ericsson, M. & Löf, O. (2019). Iron ore market review 2018. CIS Iron and Steel Review, 17, 4-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Iron ore market review 2018
2019 (English)In: CIS Iron and Steel Review, ISSN 2072-0815, Vol. 17, p. 4-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Iron ore prices remained at relatively high levels during 2018. Premia paid for high quality ores increased and are substantial. Global iron ore production is estimated to grow by around 2% in 2018. Sharp cuts in production of un-beneficiated ore have taken place in China during 2018. Demand for iron ore in general and for high grade products in particular has however increased. Future developments in China, both in the steel and iron ore industries, will be crucial to the global iron ore markets in 2019. This review is written in March 2019 and incorporates as much as possible figures and trends for the full year 2018, in some cases this is however not yet possible. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ore & Metals Publishing House, 2019
Keywords
China, Export, Forecast, Global markets, Import, Iron ore, Prices
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75636 (URN)10.17580/cisisr.2019.01.01 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Priester, M., Ericsson, M., Dolega, P. & Löf, O. (2019). Mineral grades: an important indicator for environmental impact of mineral exploitation. Mineral Economics, 32(1), 49-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mineral grades: an important indicator for environmental impact of mineral exploitation
2019 (English)In: Mineral Economics, ISSN 2191-2203, E-ISSN 2191-2211, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 49-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We have collected and analysed grade information for nine metals: copper, gold, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, PGM, tin, and zinc. Based on this analysis, we have developed a proposal of “grade classes”, i.e., what could be considered low-grade, average-grade, and high-grade deposits for all these metals. We discuss the implications of possible developments into the future of the grades of ores, from which these metals are extracted. A focus on high-grade deposits will naturally reduce the environmental impact of mining. For six metals (copper, gold, iron, nickel, PGM, and zinc), we have further analysed the volumes available for the 10% cohort of projects and operating mines with the highest grades. Three metals (iron, PGM, and zinc) show considerable volumes, between 15 and 20% of total metal content in resources in this high-grade percentile. Copper and gold have between 5 and 10% while nickel has only 1.7% in the highest 10% grade percentile.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Ore grades, Environmental impact, Mineral availability, Mineral deposits
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73816 (URN)10.1007/s13563-018-00168-x (DOI)000464850300004 ()2-s2.0-85064341395 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-05-02 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-05-02 Created: 2019-05-02 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved
Ericsson, M. & Löf, O. (2019). Mining’s contribution to national economies between 1996 and 2016. Mineral Economics, 32(2), 223-250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mining’s contribution to national economies between 1996 and 2016
2019 (English)In: Mineral Economics, ISSN 2191-2203, E-ISSN 2191-2211, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 223-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In several low- and middle-income countries rich in non-fuel mineral resources, mining makes significant contributions to national economic development as measured by the revised Mining Contribution Index (MCI-Wr). Ten countries among the 20 countries where mining contributes most (highest MCI-Wr score) have moved up one or two steps in the World Bank’s country classification between 1996 and 2016. In particular, African countries have benefitted. Socio-economic development indicators also show signs of progress for African mineral-rich countries. This paper provides an update and expansion of an earlier study within the framework of the United Nations University (UNU) World Institute for Development Economics Research (WIDER) initiative Extractives for Development. Based on the detailed data available for the sector, such as production, export, prices, mineral rents, exploration expenditure and government revenues, an analysis is carried out of the current situation for 2016, and trends in mining’s contribution to economic development for the years 1996–2016. The contribution of minerals and mining to GDP and exports reached a maximum at the peak of the mining boom in 2011. Naturally, the figures for mining’s contribution had declined for most countries by 2016, but importantly the levels were still considerably higher than in 1996. The results of this survey contradict the widespread view that mineral resources create a dependency that might not be conducive to economic and social development. In addition, this paper presents an attempt to use already available socio-economic indicators for African mineral-rich countries to measure socio-economic developments. One preliminary conclusion of this survey is that mining countries perform better than oil-producing countries and non-mineral countries in Africa as measured by these indices of human development and governance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Extractive industries, Mining contribution, Mineral rent, Africa, Super cycle, Mineral export, Exploration, Mine production
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75267 (URN)10.1007/s13563-019-00191-6 (DOI)000472970500009 ()2-s2.0-85067814470 (Scopus ID)
Note

Konferensartikel i tidskrift

Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Florén, H., Frishammar, J., Löf, A. & Ericsson, M. (2019). Raw materials management in iron and steelmaking firms. Mineral Economics, 32(1), 39-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Raw materials management in iron and steelmaking firms
2019 (English)In: Mineral Economics, ISSN 2191-2203, E-ISSN 2191-2211, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper adds new knowledge on how raw materials should be managed in iron and steelmaking firms. While previous research has contributed significantly to how firms should deal with functional challenges related to raw materials, the understanding of Raw Materials Management from a holistic perspective is largely lacking, and extant research does not provide qualified advice to firms on this matter. This study provides such knowledge by drawing on insights from Höganäs AB, a world leader in ferrous powder metallurgy, and their efforts to identify key aspects and principles of raw materials management. Our elaboration of a more holistic view on raw materials management builds on two elements. First, we depict five external uncertainties and three internal conditions that impact firm-level raw materials management. Second, we present six critical capabilities that underpin proficient firm-level raw materials management. The paper concludes with a discussion of implications for both firms aiming to increase their raw materials proficiency and to future investigations into this important area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Social Sciences Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Economics
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation; Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70206 (URN)10.1007/s13563-018-0158-7 (DOI)000464850300003 ()
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-04-12 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved
Ericsson, M., Drielsma, J., Humphreys, D., Storm, P. & Weihed, P. (2019). Why current assessments of ‘future efforts’ are no basis for establishing policies on material use: a response to research on ore grades. Mineral Economics, 32(1), 111-121
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why current assessments of ‘future efforts’ are no basis for establishing policies on material use: a response to research on ore grades
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Mineral Economics, ISSN 2191-2203, E-ISSN 2191-2211, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 111-121Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concept of declining availability due to declining primary resource quality has been investigated for various resource categories to try to determine the effort needed in future to either extract the resource or to treat it for intended use. The concept of ‘future efforts’ due to declining primary resource quality is explored by Vieira et al. (2016, 2017). They suggest that a specific burden associated with the production of each primary material should be taken into account and that this can be done by studying the costs of production or ore requirements of the material and by projecting forward likely costs into the future. For the purpose of the analysis, they employ mine cost data for 2000–2013 and reserve data published by the US Geological Survey. We will argue below that this approach is not correct and, with this comment, we wish to make it clear that—contrary to what is suggested in much of the Life Cycle Assessment literature—the future efforts concept is not an established rule of natural resource extraction. For mineral resources, it is quite impossible to proceed with extraction in the ordered way that this approach suggests because nobody has a comprehensive view of the entire natural resource. Secondly, there is no evidence available to support the idea that extracting a mineral resource today causes a decrease in availability of that mineral tomorrow. On the contrary, the weight of evidence suggests that where declines in ore grades have been observed, they are overwhelmingly due to technology development in response to high demand and have been accompanied by increased mining efficiency and increased availability of the resource to successive generations. Grade is a rather arbitrary measure since the grade of mined ore ultimately has to do with the relationship of costs and revenues. It is not only the technology employed which matters but also how smartly this technology is applied. Thirdly, the future efforts approach entirely overlooks the potential availability of mineral materials from secondary (scrap) sources, sources which are expected to become increasingly important to mineral supply in the future. Our conclusion from the discussion is that we as humans have been able to economically access ever-increasing amounts of material from often lower and lower-grade sources. What is impossible to conclude from this is that the environment no longer contains any of the higher-grade sources. In fact, all the available evidence suggests that higher-grade deposits are still out there. We remain critical optimists.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Future efforts, Ore grade, Declining availability, Life Cycle Assessment, “Type 3”, Hotelling, Surplus cost
National Category
Geology Economics
Research subject
Ore Geology; Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73814 (URN)10.1007/s13563-019-00175-6 (DOI)000464850300008 ()
Available from: 2019-05-02 Created: 2019-05-02 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved
Ericsson, M. (2018). Internationalisation of mining education and research: A recurring process running through the centuries. Eurasian Mining, 2, 44-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internationalisation of mining education and research: A recurring process running through the centuries
2018 (English)In: Eurasian Mining, ISSN 2072-0823, Vol. 2, p. 44-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

International cooperation and mobility are buzzwords of today’s research and innovation clusters all over the world. These are however not new concepts. The understanding that research and innovation can only thrive in an international and open environment has been in place for at least 300 years in Sweden. All interested and knowledgeable scientists and business developers have been welcomed to push the front of knowledge and the industry forward. The international contacts of Swedish mining education, research and innovation prove that with an open mind and a persistent, long term effort results will come. The roots of mining education and research in Sweden dates back to the 17th century. Initially the focus was on applied research rather than education, but the early efforts also slowly led to important purely scientific results. Swedish metallurgists/chemists have discovered more elements than scientists from any other nation. Over 150 years, from the early 18th century to the end of the 19th century, 20 elements-and among them many industrially important metals — were isolated and described. The ancient Falu copper mine was the logical choice for location of one of the first technical schools in Sweden: “Falu Bergskola” (Falu Mining School), which was set up in 1822. Its first director was precisely one of the chemical scientists engaged in the discovery of new elements. This Mining school was later merged with other existing institutions offering some technical training into “Tekniska Institutet” (the Technical Insitute). This was in 1876 transformed into a technical high school along German models. The Association of Swedish Iron and Steel industry (Jernkontoret in Swedish) was a key supporter and funder of these developments. The new school was called Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (KTH) in translation Royal Institute of Technology. KTH had 5 departments, including a school of mining science. In 1972 the education of mining engineers was transferred to the newly established Luleå Technical College close to the Arctic Circle. The College was later expanded and in 1997 renamed Luleå University of Technology (LTU). LTU has become one of the leading mining universities in Europe, to a large extent due to the fact that it is situated in the centre of one of Europe’s remaining mining regions. Around 2/3 of all university trained staff employed by Swedish mining has been trained at LTU. But LTU has also had its focus on the mining sector for a long time and in its internal program Mines of the Future it has relentlessly pushed the importance of mining and minerals and demonstrated its ambition to be a leading actor in this area. LTU has been appointed by Swedish government to lead the national education and research in mining. The recent decision by the EU to locate one EIT Raw Materials CLC (Co-location Centre) to Luleå means that the university has been given a similar role also on the EU level. LTU has actively built international links and supported cooperation with other universities within Europe and around the world. The bold and officially stated aim is to become one of the globally leading mining universities. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ore & Metals Publishing House, 2018
Keywords
Industry, International cooperation, Swedish mining education
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73096 (URN)10.17580/em.2018.02.11 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Ericsson, M. (2018). Marian Radetzki 80 years. Mineral Economics, 31(1-2), 1-2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marian Radetzki 80 years
2018 (English)In: Mineral Economics, ISSN 2191-2203, E-ISSN 2191-2211, Vol. 31, no 1-2, p. 1-2Article in journal, Editorial material (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-67934 (URN)10.1007/s13563-018-0154-y (DOI)000445765000001 ()2-s2.0-85047176836 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-14 Created: 2018-03-14 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved
Löf, O. & Ericsson, M. (2018). Mining's Contribution to National Economies: he extraction and export of minerals spurs economic developmen. Engineering and mining journal (1926), 219(8), 48-56
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mining's Contribution to National Economies: he extraction and export of minerals spurs economic developmen
2018 (English)In: Engineering and mining journal (1926), ISSN 0095-8948, E-ISSN 0361-395X, Vol. 219, no 8, p. 48-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article discusses contribution of mining in middle and low income countries to national economic and social development and mentions statistical analysis of the contribution of non-fuel minerals mining. Topics discussed include contribution of minerals and mining to gross domestic product (GDP), production value at mine stage of metallic minerals, and value of mineral production at the mine stage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mining Media Inc., 2018
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70595 (URN)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 1;2018-08-27 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Tilton, J. E., Crowson, P. C. .., DeYoung Jr, J. H., Eggert, R. G., Ericsson, M., Guzmán, J. I., . . . Wellmer, F.-W. (2018). Public policy and future mineral supplies. Resources policy, 57, 55-60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public policy and future mineral supplies
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Resources policy, ISSN 0301-4207, E-ISSN 1873-7641, Vol. 57, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A widespread and pessimistic view of the availability of mineral commodities calls for strong government initiatives to ensure adequate future supplies. This article provides a more market oriented and optimistic perspective, one that focuses on production costs and prices rather than physical availability. It sees short-run shortages continuing to plague commodity markets in the future as in the past. Though painful while they last, these shortages are temporary and do not pose a serious long-run threat to human welfare. Moreover, even without government intervention, they self-correct. The sharply higher prices that they evoke create strong incentives that foster supply and curb demand.

Potentially more serious are long-run shortages due to mineral depletion. Such shortages are often thought to be inevitable, a conclusion that flows directly from the physical view of depletion. For various reasons, we reject this view of depletion in favor of an economic view. The latter recognizes that depletion may create long-run shortages, but stresses that this need not be the case if new technology can continue to offset the cost-increasing effects of depletion in the future as it has in the past. The economic view also suggests that a list of mineral commodities most threatened by depletion can best be compiled using cumulative availability curves rather than the more common practice of calculating commodity life expectancies based on estimates of available stocks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-67555 (URN)10.1016/j.resourpol.2018.01.006 (DOI)000436918200005 ()2-s2.0-85044717299 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-08-08 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications