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Berglund, Kris
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 88) Show all publications
Bonturi, N., Matsakas, L., Nilsson, R., Christakopoulos, P., Miranda, E. A., Berglund, K. & Rova, U. (2015). Single Cell Oil Producing Yeasts Lipomyces starkeyi and Rhodosporidium toruloides: Selection of Extraction Strategies and Biodiesel Property Prediction (ed.). Paper presented at . Energies, 8(6), 5040-5052
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single Cell Oil Producing Yeasts Lipomyces starkeyi and Rhodosporidium toruloides: Selection of Extraction Strategies and Biodiesel Property Prediction
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2015 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 5040-5052Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Single cell oils (SCOs) are considered potential raw material for the production of biodiesel. Rhodosporidium sp. and Lipomyces sp. are good candidates for SCO production. Lipid extractability differs according to yeast species and literature on the most suitable method for each oleaginous yeast species is scarce. This work aimed to investigate the efficiency of the most cited strategies for extracting lipids from intact and pretreated cells of Rhodosporidium toruloides and Lipomyces starkeyi. Lipid extractions were conducted using hexane or combinations of chloroform and methanol. The Folch method resulted in the highest lipid yields for both yeasts (42% for R. toruloides and 48% for L. starkeyi). Also, this method eliminates the cell pretreatment step. The Bligh and Dyer method underestimated the lipid content in the tested strains (25% for R. toruloides and 34% for L. starkeyi). Lipid extractability increased after acid pretreatment for the Pedersen, hexane, and Bligh and Dyer methods. For R. toruloides unexpected fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) composition were found for some lipid extraction strategies tested. Therefore, this work provides useful information for analytical and process development aiming at biodiesel production from the SCO of these two yeast species.

National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3915 (URN)10.3390/en8065040 (DOI)000357489700020 ()2-s2.0-84933567980 (Scopus ID)1c41c552-648e-4799-baab-13687688f144 (Local ID)1c41c552-648e-4799-baab-13687688f144 (Archive number)1c41c552-648e-4799-baab-13687688f144 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20150528 (leomat)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, R., Bauer, F., Mesfun, S., Hulteberg, C., Lundgren, J., Wännström, S., . . . Berglund, K. (2014). Techno-economics of carbon preserving butanol production using a combined fermentative and catalytic approach (ed.). Paper presented at . Bioresource Technology, 161, 263-269
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Techno-economics of carbon preserving butanol production using a combined fermentative and catalytic approach
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2014 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 161, p. 263-269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a novel process for n-butanol production which combines a fermentation consuming carbon dioxide (succinic acid fermentation) with subsequent catalytic reduction steps to add hydrogen to form butanol. Process simulations in Aspen Plus have been the basis for the techno-economic analyses performed. The overall economy for the novel process cannot be justified, as production of succinic acid by fermentation is too costly. Though, succinic acid price is expected to drop drastically in a near future. By fully integrating the succinic acid fermentation with the catalytic conversion the need for costly recovery operations could be reduced. The hybrid process would need 22% less raw material than the butanol fermentation at a succinic acid fermentation yield of 0.7 g/g substrate. Additionally, a carbon dioxide fixation of up to 13 ktonnes could be achieved at a plant with an annual butanol production of 10 ktonnes

National Category
Bioprocess Technology Energy Engineering
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering; Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14267 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2014.03.055 (DOI)000335436000034 ()24717319 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84897933882 (Scopus ID)d9f200c0-23e2-4b12-95fe-cf7875940e6c (Local ID)d9f200c0-23e2-4b12-95fe-cf7875940e6c (Archive number)d9f200c0-23e2-4b12-95fe-cf7875940e6c (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140324 (robnil)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Jaros, A., Rova, U. & Berglund, K. (2013). Acetate adaptation of clostridia tyrobutyricum for improved fermentation production of butyrate (ed.). Paper presented at . SpringerPlus, 2(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acetate adaptation of clostridia tyrobutyricum for improved fermentation production of butyrate
2013 (English)In: SpringerPlus, E-ISSN 2193-1801, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is an acidogenic bacterium capable of utilizing xylose for the fermentation production of butyrate. Hot water extraction of hardwood lingocellulose is an efficient method of producing xylose where autohydrolysis of xylan is catalysed by acetate originating from acetyl groups present in hemicellulose. The presence of acetic acid in the hydrolysate might have a severe impact on the subsequent fermentations. In this study the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 26.3 g/L acetate equivalents were studied. Analysis of xylose batch fermentations found that even in the presence of high levels of acetate, acetate adapted strains had similar fermentation kinetics as the parental strain cultivated without acetate. The parental strain exposed to acetate at inhibitory conditions demonstrated a pronounced lag phase (over 100 hours) in growth and butyrate production as compared to the adapted strain (25 hour lag) or non-inhibited controls (0 lag). Additional insight into the metabolic pathway of xylose consumption was gained by determining the specific activity of the acetate kinase (AK) enzyme in adapted versus control batches. AK activity was reduced by 63% in the presence of inhibitory levels of acetate, whether or not the culture had been adapted.

National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6979 (URN)10.1186/2193-1801-2-47 (DOI)000209461900047 ()23519192 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84876555286 (Scopus ID)54e3a0bf-c3b3-4c31-84bb-f639af5bb094 (Local ID)54e3a0bf-c3b3-4c31-84bb-f639af5bb094 (Archive number)54e3a0bf-c3b3-4c31-84bb-f639af5bb094 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20130402 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Bauer, F., Berglund, K., Hulteberg, C., Lundgren, J., Mesfun, S., Nilsson, R., . . . Wännström, S. (2013). Comparative system analysis of carbon preserving fermentations for biofuels production (ed.). Paper presented at . Göteborg: The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Renewable Transportation Fuels (f3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative system analysis of carbon preserving fermentations for biofuels production
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2013 (English)Report (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Renewable Transportation Fuels (f3), 2013. p. 40
Series
f3 report ; 2013:16
National Category
Energy Engineering Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Energy Engineering; Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-25267 (URN)e77db833-8e0d-4472-a978-e70e34003fef (Local ID)e77db833-8e0d-4472-a978-e70e34003fef (Archive number)e77db833-8e0d-4472-a978-e70e34003fef (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2013; 20141207 (senmes)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Jaros, A., Rova, U. & Berglund, K. (2012). Effect of acetate on fermentation production of butyrate (ed.). Paper presented at . Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, 46(5-6), 341-347
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of acetate on fermentation production of butyrate
2012 (English)In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 46, no 5-6, p. 341-347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A carbon source for the fermentation production of butyrate is xylose extracted from ligno-cellulosic material by hot water extraction. Although this auto-hydrolysis of hemicellulose can provide a low-cost source of xylose, the process generates a high level of acetic acid that might inhibit subsequent fermentations. This study focuses on the effects of acetate on the production of butyrate from xylose by batch fermentations with a selected strain Clostridium tyrobutyricum.At initial acetate concentrations of 17.6 g L-1 and 26.3 g L-1 in the media, C. tyrobutyricum cultures exhibited a lag phase (45 and 118 hours, respectively) in terms of sugar consumption, butyrate production and cell biomass growth, lowering the overall production rate. Butyrate fermentations performed with high concentrations of acetate in the media demonstrated a re-uptake of acetate into the butyrate production pathway and after the lag phase, all cultures adapted to the inhibitory acetate, which increased the final butyrate yields by 12.6% (32.6 g L-1 compared to 28.5 g L-1).

Keywords
Chemistry - Biochemistry, Technology - Bioengineering, Kemi - Biokemi, Teknikvetenskap - Bioteknik
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9447 (URN)811a0fe8-6129-4eb1-a861-fd61d126c505 (Local ID)811a0fe8-6129-4eb1-a861-fd61d126c505 (Archive number)811a0fe8-6129-4eb1-a861-fd61d126c505 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120813 (ulrok)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Enman, J., Hodge, D., Berglund, K. & Rova, U. (2012). Growth promotive conditions for enhanced eritadenine production during submerged cultivation of Lentinus edodes (ed.). Paper presented at . Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology (1986), 87(7), 903-907
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth promotive conditions for enhanced eritadenine production during submerged cultivation of Lentinus edodes
2012 (English)In: Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology (1986), ISSN 0268-2575, E-ISSN 1097-4660, Vol. 87, no 7, p. 903-907Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Mycelium of the medicinal mushroom shiitake, Lentinus edodes, is a potential source for production of the blood cholesterol reducing compound eritadenine. To increase the mycelial biomass and in turn the production of eritadenine, a potential growth promoting substance in the form of a water extract of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) was added to the culture media. Results: The hot water extract of DDGS was shown to considerably increase the growth of shiitake mycelia in bioreactor cultivations; the mycelial yield was 2-3 times higher than in the control, and the highest final biomass concentration obtained was 3.4 g L -1. Further, by using shake flask cultures as inoculums the bioreactor cultivation time could be reduced by 1 week for some of the experiments. The highest final titer of eritadenine in the present study was 25.1 mg L -1, which was about 2 times higher than in the control, and was also obtained when a water extract of DDGS was added to the culture medium. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that a water extract of DDGS promoted the growth of shiitake mycelia in bioreactor cultivations, along with enhanced eritadenine production

National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8732 (URN)10.1002/jctb.3697 (DOI)000305061200005 ()2-s2.0-84862224967 (Scopus ID)7436deea-e182-48fb-b2c4-29a9f9bfb968 (Local ID)7436deea-e182-48fb-b2c4-29a9f9bfb968 (Archive number)7436deea-e182-48fb-b2c4-29a9f9bfb968 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120206 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Graiver, D., Dacomba, R., Khawali, M., Jaros, A., Berglund, K. & Narayan, R. (2012). Steel-corrosion inhibitors derived from soybean oil (ed.). Paper presented at . Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society, 89(10), 1895-1903
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Steel-corrosion inhibitors derived from soybean oil
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2012 (English)In: Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society, ISSN 0003-021X, E-ISSN 1558-9331, Vol. 89, no 10, p. 1895-1903Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Soybean oil derivatives containing a Schiff-base (SOS-B) were prepared and evaluated as microbial corrosion inhibitors against sulfate-reducing bacteria using the gram-positive Desulfosporosinus orientis bacteria as a representative bacterium. These SOS-B compounds were also found to be excellent inhibitors against acidic corrosion of carbon steel. These soybean oil derivatives were prepared by ozonation of soybean oil to yield aldehyde functional intermediates which were then reacted with benzylamine to produce a mixture of imine functional triglycerides and linear compounds. The structure of these soy-based derivatives was confirmed by FTIR and NMR. It was found that the addition of these SOS-B compounds to D. orientis culture provided a complete inhibition of this bacterium. Furthermore, almost no corrosion of carbon steel panels was observed when the panels were aged in 2N HCl solution containing 10 ppm of these SOS-B compounds

National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12695 (URN)10.1007/s11746-012-2077-z (DOI)000309179700015 ()2-s2.0-84870053854 (Scopus ID)bdbbb37c-75f1-4f30-81e0-dc9bd1eac449 (Local ID)bdbbb37c-75f1-4f30-81e0-dc9bd1eac449 (Archive number)bdbbb37c-75f1-4f30-81e0-dc9bd1eac449 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120522 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Enman, J., Patra, A., Ramser, K., Rova, U. & Berglund, K. (2011). Solid state characterization of sodium eritadenate (ed.). Paper presented at . American Journal of Analytical Chemistry, 2(2), 164-173
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Solid state characterization of sodium eritadenate
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2011 (English)In: American Journal of Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 2156-8251, E-ISSN 2156-8278, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 164-173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knowledge of the solid state is of great importance in the development of a new active pharmaceutical ingredient, since the solid form often dictates the properties and performance of the drug. In the present study, solid state characteristics of the sodium salt of the candidate cholesterol reducing compound eritadenine, 2(R), 3(R))-dihydroxy-4-(9-adenyl)-butanoic acid, were investigated. The compound was crystallized by slow cooling from water and various aqueous ethanol solutions, at different temperatures. Further, the compound solution was subjected to lyophilization and to high vacuum drying. The resulting solids were screened for polymorphism by micro Raman spectroscopy (λex = 830 nm) and the crystallinity was investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. Further, thermal analysis was applied to study possible occurrence of solvates or hydrates. Solids obtained from slow cooling showed crystallinity, whereas rapid cooling gave rise to more amorphous solids. Analysis of difference spectra of the Raman data for solids obtained from slow cooling of solution revealed subtle differences in the structures between crystals derived from pure water and crystals derived from aqueous ethanol solutions. Finally, from the thermal analysis it was deduced that crystals obtained from pure water were stoichiometrically dihydrates whereas crystals obtained from aqueous ethanol solutions were 2.5 hydrates; this formation of different hydrates were supported by the Raman difference analysis.

National Category
Bioprocess Technology Other Medical Engineering
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering; Medical Engineering for Healthcare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14595 (URN)10.4236/ajac.2011.22019 (DOI)dfe46855-6e65-47f5-b115-7b6eb6f34d7d (Local ID)dfe46855-6e65-47f5-b115-7b6eb6f34d7d (Archive number)dfe46855-6e65-47f5-b115-7b6eb6f34d7d (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20110831 (joen)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Berglund, K., Rova, U. & Hodge, D. (2010). Fermentation-Based Building Blocks for Renewable Resource-Based Surfactants (ed.). In: (Ed.), Mikael Kjellin; Ingegärd Johansson (Ed.), Surfactants from renewable resources: (pp. 127-141). Paper presented at . Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fermentation-Based Building Blocks for Renewable Resource-Based Surfactants
2010 (English)In: Surfactants from renewable resources, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd , 2010, p. 127-141Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

'new' top-ranked building blocks; Citric acid recovery from fermentation broths and CaCO3 precipitation; Citric, acetic and lactic acid - top three industrial carboxylic acids; Fermentation-based building blocks for renewable resource-based surfactants; Fermentation-based building blocks for surfactants; Filamentous fungi, Aspergillus niger and Candida yeast strains; New fermentation-based building blocks; Organic acid metabolites - as hydrophilic moiety; Sulfonates - largest market share of anionic surfactants; Sulfosuccinate class of surfactants

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2010
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-20735 (URN)10.1002/9780470686607.ch7 (DOI)2-s2.0-84885970080 (Scopus ID)77ff7eb1-b0e8-4f42-b6b1-036c43dee4df (Local ID)9780470760413 (ISBN)77ff7eb1-b0e8-4f42-b6b1-036c43dee4df (Archive number)77ff7eb1-b0e8-4f42-b6b1-036c43dee4df (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2010; 20131105 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Helmerius, J., Walter, J. V., Rova, U., Berglund, K. & Hodge, D. B. (2010). Impact of hemicellulose pre-extraction for bioconversion on birch Kraft pulp properties (ed.). Paper presented at . Bioresource Technology, 101(15), 5996-6005
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of hemicellulose pre-extraction for bioconversion on birch Kraft pulp properties
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2010 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 101, no 15, p. 5996-6005Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The combination of hemicellulose extraction with chemical pulping processes is one approach to generate a sugar feedstock amenable to biochemical transformation to fuels and chemicals. Extractions of hemicellulose from silver birch (Betula pendula) wood chips using either water or Kraft white liquor (NaOH, Na2S, and Na2CO3) were performed under conditions compatible with Kraft pulping, using times ranging between 20 and 90 min, temperatures of 130-160 °C, and effective alkali (EA) charges of 0-7%. The chips from select extractions were subjected to subsequent Kraft pulping and the refined pulps were made into handsheets. Several metrics for handsheet strength properties were compared with a reference pulp made without an extraction step. This study demonstrated that white liquor can be utilized to extract xylan from birch wood chips prior to Kraft cooking without decreasing the pulp yield and paper strength properties, while simultaneously impregnating cooking alkali into the wood chips. However, for the alkaline conditions tested extractions above pH 10 resulted in low concentrations of xylan. Water extractions resulted in the highest final concentrations of xylan; yielding a liquor without the presence of toxic or inhibitory inorganics and minimal soluble aromatics that we demonstrate can be successfully enzymatically hydrolyzed to monomeric xylose and fermented to succinic acid. However, water extractions were found to negatively impact some pulp properties including decreases in compression strength, bursting strength, tensile strength, and tensile stiffness while exhibiting minimal impact on elongation and slight improvement in tearing strength index.

National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10986 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2010.03.029 (DOI)000278035900035 ()20378336 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77951092391 (Scopus ID)9e1c6040-4d26-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (Local ID)9e1c6040-4d26-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (Archive number)9e1c6040-4d26-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2010; 20100421 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
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