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Cenamor, J., Parida, V., Oghazi, P., Pesämaa, O. & Wincent, J. (2019). Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriabilitymechanisms in subsidiary performance. Industrial Marketing Management, 78, 239-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriabilitymechanisms in subsidiary performance
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2019 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 78, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines how subsidiaries can manage dual embeddedness with both local partners and a multinational enterprise. Specifically, we examine the role of absorptive capacity and appropriability mechanisms on subsidiary performance. We analyse how absorptive capacity and appropriability enable subsidiaries to successfully address knowledge challenges related to internal and external networks. We conducted an empirical analysis on a sample of 165 subsidiaries. Our results suggest that absorptive capacity has a direct, positive effect on subsidiary performance, which is greater in emerging countries. The study also found an indirect effect of absorptive capacity on subsidiary performance, which is mediated through appropriability mechanisms. These findings extend the literature on international networks, dual embeddedness and absorptive capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Dual embeddedness, Absorptive capacity, Appropriability mechanisms, Emerging countries
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Business Administration
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation; Accounting and Control
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-64206 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2017.06.002 (DOI)000466451500020 ()2-s2.0-85021130911 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-04-11 (marisr)

Available from: 2017-06-19 Created: 2017-06-19 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Kibler, E., Wincent, J., Kautonen, T., Cacciotti, G. & Obschonka, M. (2019). Can prosocial motivation harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being?. Journal of Business Venturing, 34(4), 608-624
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can prosocial motivation harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being?
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 608-624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Entrepreneurship research on prosocial motivation has outlined its positive impact on well-being, but still little is known about its power, which may have deleterious personal consequences under certain conditions. In this study, we ask whether prosocial motivation can harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being when they run a commercial venture. Embedded within a contingency perspective informed by self-determination theory, we build on longitudinal survey data to explain the effect of prosocial motivation on entrepreneurs' overall life satisfaction. Our analysis demonstrates that prosocial motivation has a negative effect on entrepreneurs' life satisfaction due to increased levels of stress. However, our findings show that the negative effect of prosocial motivation dissipates when perceived autonomy at work is high compared to when it is low. Overall, our research raises questions on the role of prosocial motivation for entrepreneurs' subjective well-being and, in particular, discusses its potential “dark side” in the context of commercial entrepreneurship.

Executive summary

Can there be a “dark side” in helping others? If so, how can we better understand under what conditions it emerges? Entrepreneurship research conventionally presents prosocial motivation as a positive driver for social venture creation and entrepreneurs' well-being. However, we have little knowledge about the consequences of prosocial motivation when we move outside the social entrepreneurship context. When prosocially motivated entrepreneurs lead a commercial venture, they face the difficult task of balancing the desire to help others with the financial requirements of the business. The challenge of simultaneously accomplishing commercial and prosocial goals can result in a stressful experience that is detrimental to the entrepreneur's well-being. In this study, we ask whether and under what circumstances prosocial motivation can harm entrepreneurs' well-being.

Embedded in a contingency perspective informed by self-determination theory, this article expands our knowledge on the effects of prosocial motivation in the context of commercial entrepreneurship. We draw from original longitudinal survey data on 186 entrepreneurs in the United Kingdom to demonstrate that prosocial motivation causes entrepreneurs stress and through that stress has a negative effect on their life satisfaction. We also show that the negative effect of prosocial motivation diminishes when the degree of autonomy entrepreneurs perceive in the pursuit of daily work tasks is high. To explore the uniqueness of the entrepreneurial context, we run a comparative analysis with a sample of 544 employees. This analysis confirms that stress fully mediates the negative relationship between prosocial motivation and subjective well-being, but for employees, this negative effect disappears when their level of intrinsic motivation—the desire to expend effort based on enjoyment of the work itself—is high.

Building on our findings, we generate several important contributions. First, we help develop an understanding of the “dark side” of prosocial motivation by demonstrating that under certain circumstances, the desire to help others can be detrimental to entrepreneurs' subjective well-being. Second, we expand knowledge about the link between prosocial motivation and well-being by considering the boundary conditions (perceived autonomy and intrinsic motivation) that influence the dynamics of their relationship. Third, we set the stage for further investigations that aim to clarify the relationship between motivation and perceived autonomy and its effect on personal outcomes across different work domains.

The key insight of the study is that prosocial motivation creates a dilemma for entrepreneurs when operating a commercial business such that the desire to help others outside the context of immediate work tasks can harm their personal well-being. We also find that the perception of autonomy is key for commercial entrepreneurs to be able to realize their prosocial motivation without creating stressful situations. Extending our understanding of the conditions that shape the relationship between prosocial motivation and well-being among entrepreneurs would help in developing a more holistic notion of prosocial business venturing, one that includes the role of both commercial and social enterprising activities in contributing to personal and societal well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Entrepreneurship, prosocial motivation, subjective well-being
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71484 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusvent.2018.10.003 (DOI)000470948800003 ()2-s2.0-85055108599 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-07-01 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2019-07-01Bibliographically approved
Shir, N., Nikolaev, B. N. & Wincent, J. (2019). Entrepreneurship and well-being: The role of psychological autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Journal of Business Venturing, 34(5), Article ID 105875.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrepreneurship and well-being: The role of psychological autonomy, competence, and relatedness
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 34, no 5, article id 105875Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Drawing upon the self-determination theory, we develop a two-stage multi-path mediation model in which psychological autonomy mediates the relationship between active engagement in entrepreneurship and well-being partially through its effect on psychological competence and relatedness. We test this model on a representative sample of 1837 working individuals (251 early-stage entrepreneurs) from Sweden. We find active engagement in entrepreneurial work tasks to be strongly associated with well-being relative to non-entrepreneurial work. Thus, we highlight the importance of individual self-organization—with autonomy at its core—which makes entrepreneurial work more beneficial in terms of basic psychological needs compared to other work alternatives

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Entrepreneurship, Well-being, Self-organization, Psychological needs
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69011 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusvent.2018.05.002 (DOI)000484653600002 ()
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-09-27 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2019-09-27Bibliographically approved
Cenamor, J., Parida, V. & Wincent, J. (2019). How entrepreneurial SMEs compete through digital platforms: The roles of digital platform capability, network capability and ambidexterity. Journal of Business Research, 100, 196-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How entrepreneurial SMEs compete through digital platforms: The roles of digital platform capability, network capability and ambidexterity
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 100, p. 196-206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Digitalization offers unprecedented opportunities for entrepreneurial small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). However, many entrepreneurial SMEs lack resources and capabilities or suffer from inertia, which hampers these opportunities. This study investigates how entrepreneurial SMEs can enhance performance through digital platforms. Specifically, the study examines the effect of digital platform capability and network capability on entrepreneurial SMEs’ financial performance. The study also examines how exploitation and exploration orientations moderate this relationship. Based on analysis of 230 entrepreneurial SMEs, the results indicate that digital platform capability has a positive indirect effect on entrepreneurial SMEs’ performance via network capability. The study also shows that exploitation and exploration orientations negatively and positively moderate this effect, respectively. The results suggest that entrepreneurial SMEs can enhance their performance through digital platform capability by aligning this capability with their orientation. These findings thereby enrich the literature on entrepreneurial SMEs and capabilities. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Digitalization, Entrepreneurial small and medium-sized enterprises, Entrepreneurship, Innovation management
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73596 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.03.035 (DOI)000470942500018 ()2-s2.0-85063688194 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-04-11 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-07-01Bibliographically approved
Voitkane, A., Johansson, J., Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2019). How much does the “same-gender effect” matter in VCs' assessments of entrepreneurs?. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 12, Article ID e00133.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How much does the “same-gender effect” matter in VCs' assessments of entrepreneurs?
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 12, article id e00133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our study uses cognitive mapping techniques to take into account how the same/opposite gender influences the cognitive evaluations of venture capitalists (VCs). Contrary to what has often been discussed in previous entrepreneurship literature, our results report women VCs evaluate women entrepreneurs more critically, and men VCs evaluate men entrepreneurs more critically. However, overall, the VCs' vaguer processing and lower rating of women's venturing compared to men's indicate a general structure of subordinating women's venturing compared to men's venturing. Ultimately, this contributes with an alternative view to explain what we see on the VC scene: women entrepreneurs are more likely to be rejected. We discuss implications of these results as well as implications for future study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75262 (URN)10.1016/j.jbvi.2019.e00133 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067863472 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 1;2019-07-09 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Anokhin, S., Wincent, J., Parida, V., Chistyakova, N. & Oghazi, P. (2019). Industrial clusters, flagship enterprises and regional innovation. Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, 31(1-2), 104-118
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industrial clusters, flagship enterprises and regional innovation
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2019 (English)In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 31, no 1-2, p. 104-118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For a sample of all 88 counties in the State of Ohio over a 5-year period, this study documents the effect of flagship enterprises and concentrated industrial clusters on regional innovation. Consistent with the agglomeration arguments and the knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship, both appear to affect regional innovation positively. Additionally, regional educational attainment positively moderates the effect of industrial clusters on innovation. At the same time, flagship enterprises primarily affect regional innovation in regions with low education levels. Results are obtained with the help of conservative econometric techniques and are robust to the choice of alternative dependent variables and estimators. The findings have major policy implications and provide insights into alternative routes to encouraging regional innovation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
entrepreneurship, flagship enterprises, Industrial clusters, knowledge spillover, regional innovation
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71691 (URN)10.1080/08985626.2018.1537150 (DOI)000454085300007 ()2-s2.0-85055527779 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-01-24 (johcin) 

Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Morgan, T., Anokhin, S. & Wincent, J. (2019). Influence of market orientation on performance: the moderating roles of customer participation breadth and depth in new product development. Industry and Innovation, 26(9), 1103-1120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of market orientation on performance: the moderating roles of customer participation breadth and depth in new product development
2019 (English)In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 1103-1120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With a greater number of B2B firms integrating customers into the new product development (NPD) process, how to utilize customer involvement in NPD is an important decision because it may be a double-edged sword carrying both bright and dark sides. Utilizing a sample of 193 B2B firms across various industries, we validate previous research that suggests market orientation positively influences NPD performance and subsequently examine how this relationship may either be enhanced or diminished contingent upon how customers are utilized in the NPD process. The results show that the market orientation–NPD performance relationship is enhanced by having customers participate in a greater number of activities throughout NPD (customer participation breadth) and diminished when customers are involved at deeper levels (customer participation depth). This research suggests that the exact involvement of customers is a critical decision and has clear implications for the dialogues about customer involvement and management of customer relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Market orientation, customer participation, new product development, open innovation, co-creation
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72833 (URN)10.1080/13662716.2019.1566053 (DOI)000483776000005 ()
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-09-11 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-09-24Bibliographically approved
van Gelderen, M., Kibler, E., Kautonen, T., Munoz, P. & Wincent, J. (2019). Mindfulness and Taking Action to Start a New Business. Journal of small business management (Print)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mindfulness and Taking Action to Start a New Business
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2019 (English)In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Mindfulness, meaning a receptive attention to and awareness of present events and experience, is reported to have a wide range of benefits, but it has been suggested that it could prove costly in terms of task performance. This article analyzes how dispositional mindfulness relates to taking entrepreneurial action. Based on two waves of survey data, we find that mindful individuals are less likely to engage in entrepreneurial action than less mindful individuals, but when they do start to act, they take as many actions as individuals who score low on trait mindfulness, and even more if they have entrepreneurial experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72813 (URN)10.1111/jsbm.12499 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-02-07
Morgan, T., Anokhin, S. A. & Wincent, J. (2019). New service development by manufacturing firms: Effects of customer participation under environmental contingencies. Journal of Business Research, 104, 497-505
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New service development by manufacturing firms: Effects of customer participation under environmental contingencies
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 104, p. 497-505Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

By bridging strategy, innovation, servitization, and new service development literatures, this study suggests that customer participation enhances the effectiveness of new service development strategies. The effects are particularly pronounced in the environments characterized by low competitive intensity and high complexity of customer needs. Empirical evidence is obtained from a sample of 226 large manufacturing firms with respondents representing service, functional, and general management. The results are the first to support the importance of customer participation in the new service development context. While largely consistent with the new product development research, they offer novel insights into the role of environmental contingencies in harnessing the input of customers in the new service development process for the benefit of the firm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
New service development, Servitization, Open innovation, Customer participation, Competitive intensity, Customer needs, Service innovation
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75164 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.06.017 (DOI)000484647500040 ()
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-09-27 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-07-01 Created: 2019-07-01 Last updated: 2019-09-27Bibliographically approved
Parida, V., Burström, T., Visnjic, I. & Wincent, J. (2019). Orchestrating industrial ecosystem in circular economy: A two-stage transformation model for large manufacturing companies. Journal of Business Research, 101, 715-725
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Orchestrating industrial ecosystem in circular economy: A two-stage transformation model for large manufacturing companies
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 101, p. 715-725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Making the transition to a circular economy is an important goal for society and individual companies, particularly in resource-intensive manufacturing industries. Yet the complexity and interdependencies of such an undertaking mean that no single company can achieve it alone and ecosystem-wide orchestration is necessary. Based on a qualitative study of six large manufacturing companies (ecosystem orchestrators) and their ecosystem partners, we develop a process model that describes the scarcely understood process of ecosystem transformation toward a circular economy paradigm. We provide evidence that ecosystem orchestrators achieve the transition toward a circular economy in two stages: 1) ecosystem readiness assessment and 2) ecosystem transformation. In each stage, specific and complementary mechanisms are deployed. The article elaborates on ecosystem transformation mechanisms and their purpose, use, and interdependencies in moving toward a circular economy paradigm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Business models, Sustainability, Servitization, Industrial ecosystems, Product-service system, Circular economy, Ecosystem, Inter-organizational relationships, Orchestration
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73040 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.01.006 (DOI)000473379000070 ()2-s2.0-85059949371 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-07-11 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-02-27 Created: 2019-02-27 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8770-8874

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