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Publications (10 of 223) Show all publications
Cenamor, J., Parida, V., Oghazi, P., Pesämaa, O. & Wincent, J. (2018). Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriabilitymechanisms in subsidiary performance. Industrial Marketing Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriabilitymechanisms in subsidiary performance
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2018 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study examines how subsidiaries can manage dual embeddedness with both local partners and a multinational enterprise. Specifically, we examine the role of absorptive capacity and appropriability mechanisms on subsidiary performance. We analyse how absorptive capacity and appropriability enable subsidiaries to successfully address knowledge challenges related to internal and external networks. We conducted an empirical analysis on a sample of 165 subsidiaries. Our results suggest that absorptive capacity has a direct, positive effect on subsidiary performance, which is greater in emerging countries. The study also found an indirect effect of absorptive capacity on subsidiary performance, which is mediated through appropriability mechanisms. These findings extend the literature on international networks, dual embeddedness and absorptive capacity

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Social Sciences Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Business Administration
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation; Accounting and Control
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-64206 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2017.06.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-06-19 Created: 2017-06-19 Last updated: 2018-02-09
Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2018). Bank lending and financial discrimination from the formal economy: How women entrepreneurs get forced into involuntary bootstrapping. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 10, Article ID e00096.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bank lending and financial discrimination from the formal economy: How women entrepreneurs get forced into involuntary bootstrapping
2018 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 10, article id e00096Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of banks, their decision models, and their linkages with how entrepreneurs can act as providers to the formal economy have not been focused on much in entrepreneurship research. We explore the trend of transaction-based lending among banks on entrepreneurs’ engagement in informal economic activities (or involuntary bootstrapping activities) and how that relationship is moderated by gender. The results show that women entrepreneurs who encounter banks with transaction-based lending are forced to engage in much more informal economic activities compared to men, while this gender bias vanishes when entrepreneurs face banks with relation-based lending. We associate these results with gender stereotyping and suggest transaction-based lending to be costly for the development of formal economies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70258 (URN)10.1016/j.jbvi.2018.e00096 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050685555 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 1;2018-08-07 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2018-08-15Bibliographically approved
Kibler, E., Wincent, J., Kautonen, T., Cacciotti, G. & Obschonka, M. (2018). Can prosocial motivation harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being?. Journal of Business Venturing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can prosocial motivation harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being?
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Entrepreneurship research on prosocial motivation has outlined its positive impact on well-being, but still little is known about its power, which may have deleterious personal consequences under certain conditions. In this study, we ask whether prosocial motivation can harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being when they run a commercial venture. Embedded within a contingency perspective informed by self-determination theory, we build on longitudinal survey data to explain the effect of prosocial motivation on entrepreneurs' overall life satisfaction. Our analysis demonstrates that prosocial motivation has a negative effect on entrepreneurs' life satisfaction due to increased levels of stress. However, our findings show that the negative effect of prosocial motivation dissipates when perceived autonomy at work is high compared to when it is low. Overall, our research raises questions on the role of prosocial motivation for entrepreneurs' subjective well-being and, in particular, discusses its potential “dark side” in the context of commercial entrepreneurship.

Executive summary

Can there be a “dark side” in helping others? If so, how can we better understand under what conditions it emerges? Entrepreneurship research conventionally presents prosocial motivation as a positive driver for social venture creation and entrepreneurs' well-being. However, we have little knowledge about the consequences of prosocial motivation when we move outside the social entrepreneurship context. When prosocially motivated entrepreneurs lead a commercial venture, they face the difficult task of balancing the desire to help others with the financial requirements of the business. The challenge of simultaneously accomplishing commercial and prosocial goals can result in a stressful experience that is detrimental to the entrepreneur's well-being. In this study, we ask whether and under what circumstances prosocial motivation can harm entrepreneurs' well-being.

Embedded in a contingency perspective informed by self-determination theory, this article expands our knowledge on the effects of prosocial motivation in the context of commercial entrepreneurship. We draw from original longitudinal survey data on 186 entrepreneurs in the United Kingdom to demonstrate that prosocial motivation causes entrepreneurs stress and through that stress has a negative effect on their life satisfaction. We also show that the negative effect of prosocial motivation diminishes when the degree of autonomy entrepreneurs perceive in the pursuit of daily work tasks is high. To explore the uniqueness of the entrepreneurial context, we run a comparative analysis with a sample of 544 employees. This analysis confirms that stress fully mediates the negative relationship between prosocial motivation and subjective well-being, but for employees, this negative effect disappears when their level of intrinsic motivation—the desire to expend effort based on enjoyment of the work itself—is high.

Building on our findings, we generate several important contributions. First, we help develop an understanding of the “dark side” of prosocial motivation by demonstrating that under certain circumstances, the desire to help others can be detrimental to entrepreneurs' subjective well-being. Second, we expand knowledge about the link between prosocial motivation and well-being by considering the boundary conditions (perceived autonomy and intrinsic motivation) that influence the dynamics of their relationship. Third, we set the stage for further investigations that aim to clarify the relationship between motivation and perceived autonomy and its effect on personal outcomes across different work domains.

The key insight of the study is that prosocial motivation creates a dilemma for entrepreneurs when operating a commercial business such that the desire to help others outside the context of immediate work tasks can harm their personal well-being. We also find that the perception of autonomy is key for commercial entrepreneurs to be able to realize their prosocial motivation without creating stressful situations. Extending our understanding of the conditions that shape the relationship between prosocial motivation and well-being among entrepreneurs would help in developing a more holistic notion of prosocial business venturing, one that includes the role of both commercial and social enterprising activities in contributing to personal and societal well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Entrepreneurship, prosocial motivation, subjective well-being
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71484 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusvent.2018.10.003 (DOI)2-s2.0-85055108599 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2018-11-07
Florén, H., Frishammar, J., Parida, V. & Wincent, J. (2018). Critical success factors in early new product development: a review and a conceptual model. The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, 14(2), 411-427
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical success factors in early new product development: a review and a conceptual model
2018 (English)In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 411-427Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The literature on the front end in the New Product Development (NPD) literature is fragmented with respect to the identification and analysis of the factors that are critical to successful product development. The article has a two-fold purpose. First, it describes, analyses, and synthesizes those factors through a literature review of the research on the front end in NPD. Second, it conceptualizes a framework that features two types of success factors: foundational success factors (common to all the firm’s projects) and project-specific success factors (appropriate for the firm’s individual projects). The article makes recommendations for the management of this important phase of product development, discusses limitations of relevant previous research, and offers suggestions for future research. The article makes a theoretical contribution with its analysis and synthesis of the reasons for success in front-end activities and a practical contribution with its conceptual framework that can be used as an analytical tool by firms and their product managers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-64811 (URN)10.1007/s11365-017-0458-3 (DOI)000433040600011 ()2-s2.0-85021834228 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-06-01 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2017-07-06 Created: 2017-07-06 Last updated: 2018-08-15Bibliographically approved
Voitkane, A., Johansson, J., Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2018). Does birds of a feather flock together?: A relational gender theory approach in entrepreneurial finance. In: 21st Uddevalla Symposium, 2018: . Paper presented at 21st Uddevalla Symposium, Luleå, Sweden, 14-16 June 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does birds of a feather flock together?: A relational gender theory approach in entrepreneurial finance
2018 (English)In: 21st Uddevalla Symposium, 2018, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70612 (URN)
Conference
21st Uddevalla Symposium, Luleå, Sweden, 14-16 June 2018
Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Stroe, S., Parida, V. & Wincent, J. (2018). Effectuation or causation: An fsQCA analysis of entrepreneurial passion, risk perception, and self-efficacy. Journal of Business Research, 89, 265-272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectuation or causation: An fsQCA analysis of entrepreneurial passion, risk perception, and self-efficacy
2018 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 89, p. 265-272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper enriches the literature on entrepreneurial decision-making logic by investigating nascent entrepreneurs' use of effectuation and causation. The configurational effect of passion, entrepreneurial self-efficacy, and risk perception is tested for causal and effectual decision-making. The results, based on data gathered from 50 nascent entrepreneurs, show that, more than passion, entrepreneurial self-efficacy, and risk perception alone, it is their combination that leads to the use of a causal and an effectual logic. This fsQCA-based study thereby helps unravel some of the complexities behind entrepreneurs' choice of decision-making logic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-67479 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusres.2018.01.035 (DOI)000438002000030 ()2-s2.0-85040690916 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-08-08 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Shir, N., Nikolaev, B. N. & Wincent, J. (2018). Entrepreneurship and well-being: The role of psychological autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Journal of Business Venturing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrepreneurship and well-being: The role of psychological autonomy, competence, and relatedness
2018 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Drawing upon the self-determination theory, we develop a two-stage multi-path mediation model in which psychological autonomy mediates the relationship between active engagement in entrepreneurship and well-being partially through its effect on psychological competence and relatedness. We test this model on a representative sample of 1837 working individuals (251 early-stage entrepreneurs) from Sweden. We find active engagement in entrepreneurial work tasks to be strongly associated with well-being relative to non-entrepreneurial work. Thus, we highlight the importance of individual self-organization—with autonomy at its core—which makes entrepreneurial work more beneficial in terms of basic psychological needs compared to other work alternatives

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Entrepreneurship; Well-being; Self-organization; Psychological needs
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69011 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusvent.2018.05.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-11-07
Lenka, S., Parida, V., Rönnberg Sjödin, D. & Wincent, J. (2018). Exploring the microfoundations of servitization: How individual actions overcome organizational resistance. Journal of Business Research, 328-336
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the microfoundations of servitization: How individual actions overcome organizational resistance
2018 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, p. 328-336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Servitization research has principally focused on the transition of organizational-level strategy, systems, capabilities, and processes for firms to be able to offer advanced services to their customers. Less is known of the underlying microfoundational dynamics of such transitions at the individual-level. Based on a multiple case study of six large multinational industrial firms engaged in servitization efforts, this paper identifies the tactics (i.e., evangelizing, bootlegging, leveraging, and collaborating) that individuals adopt to overcome organizational resistance to servitization. This study also presents the conditions that are necessary for individual employees to adopt these tactics. The present study provides theoretical and practical implications of the microfoundations of servitization, focusing attention on individual-level actions that affect the outcomes at the organizational-level to drive servitization efforts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66719 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.11.021 (DOI)000434004100034 ()
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-06-21 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-06-21Bibliographically approved
Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2018). The Digitization of Banks Disproportionately Hurts Women Entrepreneurs: Women fare better when they can meet with the bankers making funding decisions.. Harvard Business Review, sep
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Digitization of Banks Disproportionately Hurts Women Entrepreneurs: Women fare better when they can meet with the bankers making funding decisions.
2018 (English)In: Harvard Business Review, ISSN 0017-8012, Vol. sepArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71209 (URN)
Available from: 2018-10-15 Created: 2018-10-15 Last updated: 2018-11-06
Lahti, T., Halko, M.-L., Karagozoglu, N. & Wincent, J. (2018). Why and how do founding entrepreneurs bond with their ventures?: Neural correlates of entrepreneurial and parental bonding. Journal of Business Venturing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why and how do founding entrepreneurs bond with their ventures?: Neural correlates of entrepreneurial and parental bonding
2018 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates why and how founding entrepreneurs bond with their ventures. We develop and test theory about the nature of bonding in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of 42 subjects (21 entrepreneurs and 21 parents). We find that entrepreneurs and parents show similar signs of affective bonding, that self-confidence plays a role in bonding style, and that the degree to which entrepreneurs include their ventures in the self and to which parents include their child in the self influences their ability to make critical assessments. Our findings suggest that bonding is similar for entrepreneurs and parents and that venture stimuli influence reward systems, self-regulatory functions, and mental factors that are associated with judgment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68893 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusvent.2018.05.001 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-05-24 Created: 2018-05-24 Last updated: 2018-06-05
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8770-8874

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