Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 242) Show all publications
Vesalainen, J., Rajala, A. & Wincent, J. (2020). Purchasers as boundary spanners: Mapping purchasing agents' persuasive orientations. Industrial Marketing Management, 84, 224-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Purchasers as boundary spanners: Mapping purchasing agents' persuasive orientations
2020 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 84, p. 224-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study introduces a framework of persuasive communication that is central to understanding how individual purchasers behave as boundary spanners to manage customer–supplier relationships. Drawing on the institutional theory and multiple governance approach, we assume authoritarian, competitive, and relational behavioral orientations reflect institutional logics at an individual level. Purchasers' boundary-spanner behavior thus manifests itself as individual purchasers' rhetorical orientations. In a sample of 349 purchasers, we find support for the existence of four configurations of orientations: competitive/authoritarian, relational, comprehensive, and neutral. A subsequent follow-up study of 20 interviews with the most typical representatives of each group suggests storylines that reflect the background and logic of different persuasive styles. The findings highlight purchaser persuasive orientation as one facet of a purchaser capability set making it possible to cope with the transactional versus relational paradox in buyer–seller relationship contexts. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Boundary-spanning, Customer–supplier relationships, Persuasion, Rhetoric, Mixed method
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75638 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2019.07.007 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2020-01-27Bibliographically approved
Shepherd, D. A., Johansson, J., Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2020). Rallying the Troops and Defending against Sanctions: A Government Body Breaking Decision‐Making Rules to Fund Entrepreneurial Ventures. Journal of Management Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rallying the Troops and Defending against Sanctions: A Government Body Breaking Decision‐Making Rules to Fund Entrepreneurial Ventures
2020 (English)In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Critical to top management’s organizing efforts are the formal rules for how organizational members are to make decisions. However, employees can break top management’s decision‐making rules. Although scholars have investigated rule breaking at the individual and group levels of analysis, research is needed into how members come together as a group to break an organization’s decision‐making rules, and how groups’ rule breaking persists. To address this important research gap, we draw from a real‐time qualitative investigation of both the breaking and following of decision‐making rules to develop a group model that: (1) explains how an individual can trigger his or her group to break decision‐making rules to generate perceived benefits for the group and/or others external to the organization, (2) provides insights into the mechanisms by which rule breaking persists, and (3) highlights the norms of developing and perpetuating groups’ breaking decision‐making rules.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
Decision making, Entrepreneurial funding, Government, Groups, Rule breaking
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-77779 (URN)10.1111/joms.12562 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-02-19 Created: 2020-02-19 Last updated: 2020-02-19
Shepherd, D. A., Parida, V. & Wincent, J. (2020). The Surprising Duality of Jugaad: Low Firm Growth and High Inclusive Growth. Journal of Management Studies, 57(1), 87-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Surprising Duality of Jugaad: Low Firm Growth and High Inclusive Growth
2020 (English)In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 87-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Western theories on creativity emphasize the importance of access to resources and the generation of innovations as a source of sustainable competitive advantage for firms. However, perhaps the emphasis on slack resources and the firm as the level of analysis may be less appropriate for understanding the benefits of individual creative problem solving in resource‐poor environments of the east; focusing solely on the firm is not sufficiently inclusive and may underestimate the benefits of creative problem solving under resource scarcity. Through an inductive interpretive case study of 12 problem solvers in the highly resource‐poor environment of rural India, we identified the antecedents, dimensions and duality of outcomes for an Indian cultural source of creative problem solving called jugaad. Jugaad relies on assertive defiance, trial‐and‐error experiential learning and the recombination of available resources to improvise a frugal quick‐fix solution. Our inductive framework provides new insights into the dual outcomes of creative problem solving from an eastern perspective; jugaad is unlikely to be a source of competitive advantage for firm growth but represents a source of enhanced wellbeing for inclusive growth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UK: John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
Creativity, inclusive growth, innovation, social entrepreneurship
National Category
Business Administration Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75416 (URN)10.1111/joms.12309 (DOI)
Projects
CiiR
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-01-13 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved
Cenamor, J., Parida, V., Oghazi, P., Pesämaa, O. & Wincent, J. (2019). Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriabilitymechanisms in subsidiary performance. Industrial Marketing Management, 78, 239-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriabilitymechanisms in subsidiary performance
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 78, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines how subsidiaries can manage dual embeddedness with both local partners and a multinational enterprise. Specifically, we examine the role of absorptive capacity and appropriability mechanisms on subsidiary performance. We analyse how absorptive capacity and appropriability enable subsidiaries to successfully address knowledge challenges related to internal and external networks. We conducted an empirical analysis on a sample of 165 subsidiaries. Our results suggest that absorptive capacity has a direct, positive effect on subsidiary performance, which is greater in emerging countries. The study also found an indirect effect of absorptive capacity on subsidiary performance, which is mediated through appropriability mechanisms. These findings extend the literature on international networks, dual embeddedness and absorptive capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Dual embeddedness, Absorptive capacity, Appropriability mechanisms, Emerging countries
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Business Administration
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation; Accounting and Control
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-64206 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2017.06.002 (DOI)000466451500020 ()2-s2.0-85021130911 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-04-11 (marisr)

Available from: 2017-06-19 Created: 2017-06-19 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Kibler, E., Wincent, J., Kautonen, T., Cacciotti, G. & Obschonka, M. (2019). Can prosocial motivation harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being?. Journal of Business Venturing, 34(4), 608-624
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can prosocial motivation harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being?
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 608-624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Entrepreneurship research on prosocial motivation has outlined its positive impact on well-being, but still little is known about its power, which may have deleterious personal consequences under certain conditions. In this study, we ask whether prosocial motivation can harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being when they run a commercial venture. Embedded within a contingency perspective informed by self-determination theory, we build on longitudinal survey data to explain the effect of prosocial motivation on entrepreneurs' overall life satisfaction. Our analysis demonstrates that prosocial motivation has a negative effect on entrepreneurs' life satisfaction due to increased levels of stress. However, our findings show that the negative effect of prosocial motivation dissipates when perceived autonomy at work is high compared to when it is low. Overall, our research raises questions on the role of prosocial motivation for entrepreneurs' subjective well-being and, in particular, discusses its potential “dark side” in the context of commercial entrepreneurship.

Executive summary

Can there be a “dark side” in helping others? If so, how can we better understand under what conditions it emerges? Entrepreneurship research conventionally presents prosocial motivation as a positive driver for social venture creation and entrepreneurs' well-being. However, we have little knowledge about the consequences of prosocial motivation when we move outside the social entrepreneurship context. When prosocially motivated entrepreneurs lead a commercial venture, they face the difficult task of balancing the desire to help others with the financial requirements of the business. The challenge of simultaneously accomplishing commercial and prosocial goals can result in a stressful experience that is detrimental to the entrepreneur's well-being. In this study, we ask whether and under what circumstances prosocial motivation can harm entrepreneurs' well-being.

Embedded in a contingency perspective informed by self-determination theory, this article expands our knowledge on the effects of prosocial motivation in the context of commercial entrepreneurship. We draw from original longitudinal survey data on 186 entrepreneurs in the United Kingdom to demonstrate that prosocial motivation causes entrepreneurs stress and through that stress has a negative effect on their life satisfaction. We also show that the negative effect of prosocial motivation diminishes when the degree of autonomy entrepreneurs perceive in the pursuit of daily work tasks is high. To explore the uniqueness of the entrepreneurial context, we run a comparative analysis with a sample of 544 employees. This analysis confirms that stress fully mediates the negative relationship between prosocial motivation and subjective well-being, but for employees, this negative effect disappears when their level of intrinsic motivation—the desire to expend effort based on enjoyment of the work itself—is high.

Building on our findings, we generate several important contributions. First, we help develop an understanding of the “dark side” of prosocial motivation by demonstrating that under certain circumstances, the desire to help others can be detrimental to entrepreneurs' subjective well-being. Second, we expand knowledge about the link between prosocial motivation and well-being by considering the boundary conditions (perceived autonomy and intrinsic motivation) that influence the dynamics of their relationship. Third, we set the stage for further investigations that aim to clarify the relationship between motivation and perceived autonomy and its effect on personal outcomes across different work domains.

The key insight of the study is that prosocial motivation creates a dilemma for entrepreneurs when operating a commercial business such that the desire to help others outside the context of immediate work tasks can harm their personal well-being. We also find that the perception of autonomy is key for commercial entrepreneurs to be able to realize their prosocial motivation without creating stressful situations. Extending our understanding of the conditions that shape the relationship between prosocial motivation and well-being among entrepreneurs would help in developing a more holistic notion of prosocial business venturing, one that includes the role of both commercial and social enterprising activities in contributing to personal and societal well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Entrepreneurship, prosocial motivation, subjective well-being
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71484 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusvent.2018.10.003 (DOI)000470948800003 ()2-s2.0-85055108599 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-07-01 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2019-07-01Bibliographically approved
Laur, I., Klofsten, M., Bienkowska, D., Wincent, J. & Ylinenpää, H. (2019). Development of European cluster initiatives: stakeholders' contribution and enrolment. Global Business and Economics Review (GBER), 21(6), 685-711
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of European cluster initiatives: stakeholders' contribution and enrolment
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Global Business and Economics Review (GBER), ISSN 1097-4954, E-ISSN 1745-1329, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 685-711Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated how cluster initiatives' members contribute to cluster initiatives concerning tasks as well as what dependency patterns exist between maturation level and enrolment of members in these organisations. The content of the work is considered as crucial for organisational functioning and development. The findings are based on survey responses from 136 (53% response rate) cluster initiatives from eight European countries. The results show that, first, all members contribute to initiatives' development by performing strategic, operational tasks, and provision of resources. Each member tends to focus more on one task than the others that are delegated. Second, two factors influence enrolment of new members in cluster initiatives: age and presence of other influential members. The more mature cluster initiatives become the more networks and established organisational attributes it will have. This reflects longevity of the initiative and good-quality, intermediary assistance, which are attractive for potential members.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2019
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Centre - Centre for Interorganisational Innovation Research (CiiR); Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76478 (URN)10.1504/GBER.2019.102526 (DOI)2-s2.0-85073381822 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 1;2019-10-23 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-10-23 Created: 2019-10-23 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Shir, N., Nikolaev, B. N. & Wincent, J. (2019). Entrepreneurship and well-being: The role of psychological autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Journal of Business Venturing, 34(5), Article ID 105875.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrepreneurship and well-being: The role of psychological autonomy, competence, and relatedness
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 34, no 5, article id 105875Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Drawing upon the self-determination theory, we develop a two-stage multi-path mediation model in which psychological autonomy mediates the relationship between active engagement in entrepreneurship and well-being partially through its effect on psychological competence and relatedness. We test this model on a representative sample of 1837 working individuals (251 early-stage entrepreneurs) from Sweden. We find active engagement in entrepreneurial work tasks to be strongly associated with well-being relative to non-entrepreneurial work. Thus, we highlight the importance of individual self-organization—with autonomy at its core—which makes entrepreneurial work more beneficial in terms of basic psychological needs compared to other work alternatives

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Entrepreneurship, Well-being, Self-organization, Psychological needs
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69011 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusvent.2018.05.002 (DOI)000484653600002 ()
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-09-27 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2019-09-27Bibliographically approved
Cenamor, J., Parida, V. & Wincent, J. (2019). How entrepreneurial SMEs compete through digital platforms: The roles of digital platform capability, network capability and ambidexterity. Journal of Business Research, 100, 196-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How entrepreneurial SMEs compete through digital platforms: The roles of digital platform capability, network capability and ambidexterity
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 100, p. 196-206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Digitalization offers unprecedented opportunities for entrepreneurial small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). However, many entrepreneurial SMEs lack resources and capabilities or suffer from inertia, which hampers these opportunities. This study investigates how entrepreneurial SMEs can enhance performance through digital platforms. Specifically, the study examines the effect of digital platform capability and network capability on entrepreneurial SMEs’ financial performance. The study also examines how exploitation and exploration orientations moderate this relationship. Based on analysis of 230 entrepreneurial SMEs, the results indicate that digital platform capability has a positive indirect effect on entrepreneurial SMEs’ performance via network capability. The study also shows that exploitation and exploration orientations negatively and positively moderate this effect, respectively. The results suggest that entrepreneurial SMEs can enhance their performance through digital platform capability by aligning this capability with their orientation. These findings thereby enrich the literature on entrepreneurial SMEs and capabilities. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Digitalization, Entrepreneurial small and medium-sized enterprises, Entrepreneurship, Innovation management
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73596 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.03.035 (DOI)000470942500018 ()2-s2.0-85063688194 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-04-11 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-07-01Bibliographically approved
Johansson, J., Malmström, M., Wincent, J. & Parida, V. (2019). How individual cognitions overshadow regulations and group norms: a study of government venture capital decisions. Small Business Economics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How individual cognitions overshadow regulations and group norms: a study of government venture capital decisions
2019 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This paper explores how government venture capitalists approve or reject financing applications. Based on longitudinal observations, complemented by interviews, documentation, and secondary data, the findings show the limited influence of the regulative and normative logics (e.g., formal guidelines and accepted behavior) on government venture capitalists’ decisions. Instead, individual decisions are observed to be largely overshadowed by cognitions and heuristics, which dominate formal regulations and socially constructed group-level norms. Although official decision communications state that regulations have been followed, the evidence suggests that the cognitive logic dominates the funding decision-making process through a set of overshadowing forces that restrict the influence of the normative and regulative logics on funding decisions. This research has implications for venture financing and highlights the importance of cognitions in shaping venture capital decisions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Government investment, Venture financing, Venture capital, Entrepreneurship, Institutional theory, Decision making
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76815 (URN)10.1007/s11187-019-00273-3 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-11-22 Created: 2019-11-22 Last updated: 2020-01-24
Voitkane, A., Johansson, J., Malmström, M. & Wincent, J. (2019). How much does the “same-gender effect” matter in VCs' assessments of entrepreneurs?. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 12, Article ID e00133.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How much does the “same-gender effect” matter in VCs' assessments of entrepreneurs?
2019 (English)In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 12, article id e00133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our study uses cognitive mapping techniques to take into account how the same/opposite gender influences the cognitive evaluations of venture capitalists (VCs). Contrary to what has often been discussed in previous entrepreneurship literature, our results report women VCs evaluate women entrepreneurs more critically, and men VCs evaluate men entrepreneurs more critically. However, overall, the VCs' vaguer processing and lower rating of women's venturing compared to men's indicate a general structure of subordinating women's venturing compared to men's venturing. Ultimately, this contributes with an alternative view to explain what we see on the VC scene: women entrepreneurs are more likely to be rejected. We discuss implications of these results as well as implications for future study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75262 (URN)10.1016/j.jbvi.2019.e00133 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067863472 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 1;2019-07-09 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2020-01-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8770-8874

Search in DiVA

Show all publications