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Skjaerven, L. H., Gard, G., Gómez-Conesa, A. & Catalan-Matamoros, D. (2019). A vocabulary describing health-terms of movement quality: a phenomenological study of movement communication. Disability and Rehabilitation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A vocabulary describing health-terms of movement quality: a phenomenological study of movement communication
2019 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the study was to develop a vocabulary targeting communication of health-terms ofmovement quality, establishing professional knowledge of a movement terminology usefull withinrehabilitation.

Methods: A phenomenological study design was chosen, inviting movement experts working inrehabilitation to describe movement observations when a change into more functional, health relatedways of moving appeared in the rehabilitation processes. 15 physiotherapy experts were recruited,five from the field of neurology, primary health care and psychiatry. The informants had between12-38 years of clinical practice, treating patients of all ages with a wide specter of diagnoses. Datacollection followed a qualitative study design, of individual, in-depth interviews, based on a semi-structured interview guide. The interviews were taped, transcribed and sent to the informants forvalidation. Data analysis followed recommendation of Giorgi, modified by Malterud. Ethical considera-tions were followed.

Results: Data revealed a vocabulary, clustered in five themes, Biomechanical, Physiological, Psycho-socio-cultural, Existential and Overarching perspective, 16 underlying categories and 122 descriptive health-terms of movement quality.

Conclusion: The study demonstrated a multi-perspective movement vocabulary of 122 health characteris-tic terms, developed to facilitate movement communication within the broad field of rehabilitation. Theresult calls for further research concerning a movement vocabulary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Movement vocabulary, movement health-terms, professional movement communication, movement quality, basic body awareness therapy
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73731 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2019.1585970 (DOI)31009266 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-10-03
Gard, G., Nyboe, L. & Gyllensten, A. (2019). Clinical reasoning and clinical use of basic body awareness therapy in physiotherapy: a qualitative study?. European Journal of Physiotherapy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical reasoning and clinical use of basic body awareness therapy in physiotherapy: a qualitative study?
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Clinical reasoning is the ability to integrate and apply different types of knowledge, weigh evidence critically and reflect upon the process to arrive at a diagnosis. Body awareness is an approach directed toward an awareness of how the body is used in terms of body function, behaviour, and interaction with self and others. Methods: In the present study, 36 physiotherapists (PTs) from 13 countries working with body awareness methods, mainly Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) in mental health were interviewed in six focus groups. Content analysis was used to analyse how the informants’ reasoned around the concept of body awareness therapy, and how they use it in their clinical work with patients. Result: Body awareness was conceived as being in contact with sensations and emotions, to be able to control symptoms, such as pain, to find a balance and to develop one’s identity by relating to oneself and others. BBAT was used as a whole body treatment, to promote balance and stability, to teach about body, movements, and coping strategies, to interact in a therapeutic approach and to be integrated with other methods and professionals. Conclusion: The present results can be used to improve the PTs clinical reasoning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
clinical competence, focus group, health, Physiotherapists perspective
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72846 (URN)10.1080/21679169.2018.1549592 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-08-22
Lundvik Gyllensten, A., Nyboe Jacobsen, L. & Gard, G. (2019). Clinician perspectives of Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) in mental health physical therapy: An international qualitative study. Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinician perspectives of Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) in mental health physical therapy: An international qualitative study
2019 (English)In: Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies, ISSN 1360-8592, E-ISSN 1532-9283Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Body awareness is a movement therapy used in Physical Therapy in Mental Health especially in Scandinavia. The method Basic Body Awareness Therapy has been scientifically investigated in particular for patients with Depression, Schizophrenia and Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSD).

Methods

Thirty-four Physical Therapists from 13 countries working with the Basic Body Awareness Therapy method in Mental Health Care were interviewed in six focus groups about what effects they have experienced in their work with patients. The Physical Therapists worked within the whole Mental Health spectra. Content analysis was used to analyze the informants’ experiences of the clinical effects of body awareness.

Results

Five categories emerged: To be in contact, Refocus and coping, Sense of Self, Relations to others and Daily life activities. The results are discussed in relation to previous research, existing theories of body awareness and cognitive neuroscience and findings of experimental psychology.

Conclusion

The informants experienced that Basic Body Awareness Therapy worked mainly by helping the patients to be in better contact with their “bodily self.” Stability, balance, improved grounding and the ability to relax were understood as the basis to establish an improved sense of self and leading to improved acceptance of oneself and one’s ability to relate to others.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-74954 (URN)10.1016/j.jbmt.2019.04.012 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065411843 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-06-25
Skjærven, L. H., Mattsson, M., Catalan-Matamoros, D., Parker, A., Gard, G. & Gyllensten, A. (2019). Consensus on core phenomena and statements describing Basic Body Awareness Therapy within the movement awareness domain in physiotherapy. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 35(1), 80-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consensus on core phenomena and statements describing Basic Body Awareness Therapy within the movement awareness domain in physiotherapy
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2019 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 80-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physiotherapists are facing complex health challenges in the treatment of persons suffering from long-lasting musculoskeletal disorders and mental health problems. Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) is a physiotherapy approach within the movement awareness domain developed to bridge physical, mental, and relational health challenges. The purpose of this study was to reach a consensus on core phenomena and statements describing BBAT. A consensus-building process was conducted using the nominal group technique (NGT). Twenty-one BBAT experts from 10 European countries participated in a concentrated weekend workshop of 20 hours. All participants signed informed consent. Participants reached a consensus on 138 core phenomena, clustered in three overarching categories: clinical core, historical roots, and research and evaluation phenomena. Of the 106 clinical core phenomena, the participants agreed on three categories of phenomena: movement quality, movement awareness practice, and movement awareness therapy and pedagogy. Furthermore, the participants reached 100 percent consensus on 16 of 30 statements describing BBAT. This study provides a consensus on core phenomena and statements describing BBAT. The data reveal phenomena implemented when promoting movement quality through movement awareness. Data provide clarity in some aspects of the vocabulary as fundamental theory. Further reearch will be developed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Movement quality, movement awareness, movement awareness therapy, movement awareness learning
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-67840 (URN)10.1080/09593985.2018.1434578 (DOI)000461795500007 ()29482403 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056578224 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-11-29 (svasva)

Available from: 2018-03-05 Created: 2018-03-05 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Larsson, A., Berggård, G., Rosander, P. & Gard, G. (2019). Gait speed with anti-slip devices on icy pedestrian crossings relate to perceived fall-risk and balance. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(14), Article ID 2451.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gait speed with anti-slip devices on icy pedestrian crossings relate to perceived fall-risk and balance
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 14, article id 2451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is important to find criteria for preventive measures and appropriate assistive devices to reduce pedestrian injuries and increase walking in winter. Reducing the rate of falls on icy surfaces and improving people’s ability to safely cross a street in winter conditions by achieving an adequate walking speed, for example, need to be considered. This study explores pedestrian perceptions of fall risk, balance, and footfall transitions while using different designs for anti-slip devices on ice and snow-covered ice and relates these to measures of gait speed and friction. Trials were performed with nine pedestrians testing 19 anti-slip devices on ice and ice covered with snow. Laboratory tests of the dynamic coefficient of friction (DCOF) on plain ice were also performed. The findings suggest that there was conformity in the participants’ perceptions of good balance and low fall risk for one-fifth of the devices (three whole-foot designs and one design with built-in spikes). We also found that gait speed on icy pedestrian crossings is related to perceived fall-risk and balance control, but not to DCOF of the anti-slip devices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: MDPI, 2019
Keywords
anti-slip device, classification, postural control, pedestrian crossing, safety, gait speed, winter conditions
National Category
Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75254 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16142451 (DOI)000480659300005 ()31295887 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069835747 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration, 2013/90656
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-07-11 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-07-08 Created: 2019-07-08 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
Gard, G., Pessah-Rasmussen, H., Brogårdh, C., Nilsson, Å. & Lindgren, I. (2019). Need for structured healthcare organization and support for return to work after stroke in Sweden: Experiences of stroke survivors. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Need for structured healthcare organization and support for return to work after stroke in Sweden: Experiences of stroke survivors
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore stroke survivors’ experiences of healthcare-related facilitators and barriers concerning return to work after stroke.Design: A qualitative study.Setting: Outpatient stroke rehabilitation unit at a University Hospital in southern Sweden.Participants: A convenient sample of 20 persons admitted to Skåne University Hospital for acute stroke care (median age 52 years), in employment of at least 10 h per week at stroke onset and having been referred to stroke rehabilitation within 180 days.Methods: The interviews were performed by focus groups, and the data were analysed by contentanalysis.Results: Facilitating factors were a tailored rehabilitation content with relevant treatments, adequate timing and a structured stepwise return-to-work process. A lack of sufficient early healthcare information, rehabilitation planning and coordination were perceived as barriers. An early rehabilitation plan, a contact person, and improved communication between rehabilitation actors were requested, as well as help with work transport, home care, children and psychosocial support for families.Conclusion: Tailored rehabilitation content and a structured stepwise return-to-work process facilitated return to work. Insufficient structure within the healthcare system and lack of support in daily life were perceived barriers to return to work, and need to be improved. These aspects should be considered in the return-to-work process after stroke.

National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76230 (URN)10.2340/16501977-2591 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-10-03 Created: 2019-10-03 Last updated: 2019-10-03
Lindgren, I., Brogårdh, C. & Gard, G. (2019). Pain management strategies among persons with long-term shoulder pain after stroke: a qualitative study. Clinical Rehabilitation, 33(2), 357-364
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pain management strategies among persons with long-term shoulder pain after stroke: a qualitative study
2019 (English)In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 357-364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore strategies that persons with persistent shoulder pain after stroke use to manage their pain in daily life. Design: A qualitative study using semi-structured face-to-face interviews, analysed by content analysis. Setting: A university hospital. Subjects: Thirteen community-dwelling persons (six women; median age: 65 years; range 57-77) with shoulder pain after stroke were interviewed median two years after the pain onset. Results: An overall theme 'Managing shoulder pain by adopting various practical and cognitive strategies' emerged from the analysis. Three categories were identified: (1) practical modifications to solve daily life problems; (2) changed movement patterns and specific actions to mitigate the pain, by non-painful movements, avoidance of pain-provoking activities and various pain distracting activities and (3) learned how to deal with the pain mentally. Several strategies were used simultaneously and they were experienced successful to various degrees. Conclusion: The findings in the present study indicate that persons with persistent shoulder pain after stroke use both practical and cognitive strategies to manage their pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Stroke, shoulder pain, rehabilitation, interview, coping, qualitative study
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71089 (URN)10.1177/0269215518802444 (DOI)000456887100021 ()30255715 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059692756 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-02-13 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved
Larsson, A., Berggård, G., Rosander, P. & Gard, G. (2019). Safe community walking with anti-slip devices: The changing face of barriers to soft mobility in winter communities. In: : . Paper presented at EU Falls Festival 2019. Bridging the gap between theory and practice. 1-2 October, Umeå, Sweden..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Safe community walking with anti-slip devices: The changing face of barriers to soft mobility in winter communities
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76158 (URN)
Conference
EU Falls Festival 2019. Bridging the gap between theory and practice. 1-2 October, Umeå, Sweden.
Projects
Arctic risk in urban spaces
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration, 2013/90656
Available from: 2019-09-29 Created: 2019-09-29 Last updated: 2019-10-06
Gard, G., Berggård, G., Rosander, P. & Larsson, A. (2018). Pedestrians perceptions of community walking with anti-slip devices: an explorative case study. Journal of Transport and Health, 11, 202-208
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedestrians perceptions of community walking with anti-slip devices: an explorative case study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Transport and Health, ISSN 2214-1405, E-ISSN 2214-1405, Vol. 11, p. 202-208Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The risk of falls on slippery surfaces during wintertime is a public safety problem in the Nordic region in the Arctic. The aim of this case study was to explore pedestrians perceptions of walking safety, balance, slipping risk, priority for own use and subjective criteria for a well functioning anti-slip device. An experimental set-up was utilised in which nine pedestrians tested 19 anti-slip devices by simulating walking in realistic traffic situations on four different surfaces. The pedestrians favoured devices with a high number of friction points, distributed under the whole sole (in-built) or forefoot (sandpaper). Also, a whole-foot device with a high number of spikes received high ratings in all aspects measured except in balance enabling properties. Identified subjective criteria were safe foothold, comfort, enabling a normal gait, stability, silence, and predictability. The results indicate that both anti-slip properties and balance enabling properties of the device need to be considered for safe community walking

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Anti-slip device, Usability, Walking safety, Balance, Pedestrian, Population health, Arctic
National Category
Physiotherapy Architectural Engineering
Research subject
Physiotherapy; Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70755 (URN)10.1016/j.jth.2018.09.001 (DOI)000454589000023 ()2-s2.0-85053180535 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-12-06 (svasva)

Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, I., Gard, G. & Brogårdh, C. (2018). Shoulder pain after stroke – experiences, consequences in daily life and effects of interventions: a qualitative study. Disability and Rehabilitation, 40(10), 1176-1182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shoulder pain after stroke – experiences, consequences in daily life and effects of interventions: a qualitative study
2018 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1176-1182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe experiences of shoulder pain after stroke, how pain affects daily life and perceived effects of interventions.

Method: A qualitative interview study including 13 community-dwelling persons (six women; median age 65 years) with persistent shoulder pain after stroke.

Results: Three categories emerged from the content analysis. In “Multiple pain characteristics” an insidious pain onset was reported. The pain existed both day and night and could be located around the shoulder girdle but also have radiation to the arm and hand. An explanation of the pain was seldom given. In “Limitations caused by the pain” it was described how the pain negatively influenced personal care, household activities and leisure, but also could lead to emotional reactions. In “Multiple pain interventions with various effects” a variety of interventions were described. Self-management interventions with gentle movements were perceived most effective. A restraint attitude to pain medication due to side effects was reported.

Conclusions: Shoulder pain after stroke can lead to a variety of pain characteristics. As the pain is complex and may affect many important areas in a person’s life, multidisciplinary rehabilitation interventions are important.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62313 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2017.1290699 (DOI)000425689100009 ()28637154 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014480344 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-02-26 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-03-06 Created: 2017-03-06 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6975-8344

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