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Biography [eng]

A systems perspective on human movement and health in the Arctic:  

My area of practice and research is physiotherapy. I have clinical experience in motion analysis, work physiology, health psychology and rehabilitation. A particular focus of my research is on the significance of the environment, social context and people’s self-efficacy beliefs for physical performance and mobility.

Located in the subarctic area of northern Scandinavia, my research activities include exploring prerequisites for the populations’ safety and activity in winter environments. In transdisciplinary projects, we study the construction of outdoor environments and seasonal climate variations, as well as how people’s balance control, attitudes and habits affect when a person feels comfortable to move outdoors in winter.

Also, my research includes the development of the Internet of Things, and activity recognition systems to support senior people’s active and independent living, through timely caregiving.

Biography [swe]

 

Publications (10 of 59) Show all publications
Larsson, A. & Chapman, D. (2020). Perceived impact of meteorological conditions on the use of public space in winter settlements. International journal of biometeorology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived impact of meteorological conditions on the use of public space in winter settlements
2020 (English)In: International journal of biometeorology, ISSN 0020-7128, E-ISSN 1432-1254Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to assess the impact of meteorological conditions on the use of public space in Scandinavia and Canada. Between September 21 and December 18, 2017, a cross-sectional online survey ‘EAMQ-Climate: space’ was distributed via web-based platforms. Survey responses were received from 361 residents (258 people from Scandinavia and 103 from Canada). The relative impact of the meteorological determinants on the use of public space was calculated, and a factor analysis was performed. Disparities between Canada and Scandinavia as well as between the climate zones represented were analysed using ANOVA. Overall results showed that the most significant meteorological enablers for the use of outdoor public spaces in winter were solar gain, snowfall and snow-covered surfaces. The main barriers were slush-covered and icy surfaces, rainfall and darkness. Wind and cold were conditions with less influence. The impact of rain and ice, however, differed between climatic zones. It was also established that, when addressing the meteorological impact on avoiding the use of public spaces in winter, it is vital to discriminate between conditions related to a) the ground surface and b) ambient conditions, as well as the particular significance of c) snow and sun, and d) darkness. For the design of public space in winter cities, we conclude that designers need to focus on a wider range of weather conditions than sun, wind and cold, and include snow, rainfall, slushy and icy ground and poor visibility. The study suggests that winter public space has a higher climatic design requirement to be successful than streets and pathways that are mainly used for soft mobility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Public space, Urban microclimate, Winter cities, Outdoor activity
National Category
Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-77253 (URN)10.1007/s00484-019-01852-5 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-12-26 Created: 2019-12-26 Last updated: 2020-01-07
Chapman, D. & Larsson, A. (2019). Climate change and human behaviour: Understanding modal choice in a rapidly urbanising Arctic. In: Adaptation to Climate Change: . Paper presented at Arctic Week 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change and human behaviour: Understanding modal choice in a rapidly urbanising Arctic
2019 (English)In: Adaptation to Climate Change, 2019Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This poster explores the human dimension of non-motorised transport, i.e. soft-mobility in Arctic communities. Empirical results are used to show how people’s modal choice in the European Arctic is being influenced by climate evolution and human-made climate change. From these results, it is possible to conceive new visions of the how to design the outside environments of Arctic settlements that can better enable people to move around in Arctic communities with reduced reliance on vehicles. At the societal level, this research will help reduce energy consumption and pollution from transport.

National Category
Physiotherapy Architectural Engineering
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-77169 (URN)
Conference
Arctic Week 2019
Available from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2020-01-07
Larsson, A., Berggård, G., Rosander, P. & Gard, G. (2019). Gait speed with anti-slip devices on icy pedestrian crossings relate to perceived fall-risk and balance. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(14), Article ID 2451.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gait speed with anti-slip devices on icy pedestrian crossings relate to perceived fall-risk and balance
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 14, article id 2451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is important to find criteria for preventive measures and appropriate assistive devices to reduce pedestrian injuries and increase walking in winter. Reducing the rate of falls on icy surfaces and improving people’s ability to safely cross a street in winter conditions by achieving an adequate walking speed, for example, need to be considered. This study explores pedestrian perceptions of fall risk, balance, and footfall transitions while using different designs for anti-slip devices on ice and snow-covered ice and relates these to measures of gait speed and friction. Trials were performed with nine pedestrians testing 19 anti-slip devices on ice and ice covered with snow. Laboratory tests of the dynamic coefficient of friction (DCOF) on plain ice were also performed. The findings suggest that there was conformity in the participants’ perceptions of good balance and low fall risk for one-fifth of the devices (three whole-foot designs and one design with built-in spikes). We also found that gait speed on icy pedestrian crossings is related to perceived fall-risk and balance control, but not to DCOF of the anti-slip devices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: MDPI, 2019
Keywords
anti-slip device, classification, postural control, pedestrian crossing, safety, gait speed, winter conditions
National Category
Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75254 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16142451 (DOI)000480659300005 ()31295887 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069835747 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration, 2013/90656
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-07-11 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-07-08 Created: 2019-07-08 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
Larsson, A., Berggård, G., Rosander, P. & Gard, G. (2019). Safe community walking with anti-slip devices: The changing face of barriers to soft mobility in winter communities. In: : . Paper presented at EU Falls Festival 2019. Bridging the gap between theory and practice. 1-2 October, Umeå, Sweden..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Safe community walking with anti-slip devices: The changing face of barriers to soft mobility in winter communities
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76158 (URN)
Conference
EU Falls Festival 2019. Bridging the gap between theory and practice. 1-2 October, Umeå, Sweden.
Projects
Arctic risk in urban spaces
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration, 2013/90656
Available from: 2019-09-29 Created: 2019-09-29 Last updated: 2019-10-22
Chapman, D. & Larsson, A. (2019). Toward an Integrated Model for Soft-Mobility. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(19), Article ID 3669.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward an Integrated Model for Soft-Mobility
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 19, article id 3669Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A key urban design challenge is to create built environments that encourage outdoor activityall year round. This study explores a new model for soft-mobility that places the interaction betweenthe urban form, the seasonal climate and climate change, and the individual at the center of people’ssoft-mobility choices, or in more general, their modal choice. The research methods used werecomparative studies of documents, surveys, mental mapping, and photo elicitation. These studieswere undertaken to research people’s outdoor activity in the built environment during the winterseason of a cold climate settlement. The results were analyzed against the three-dimensions of themodel. In the discussion it is argued that in places with significant climate variation, the interactionbetween the urban form, the season, and the individual together influence soft-mobility choices. Inturn, these interactions influence people’s level of outdoor activity and the individual health benefitssuch activity can aord. In conclusion, it is highlighted that all three dimensions of the model are in aconstant state of change and evolution, especially in relation to planning and development processesand climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
urban design, outdoor activity, health outcomes, climate change
National Category
Social Sciences Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76156 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16193669 (DOI)000494748600165 ()31569591 (PubMedID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-10-01 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-09-29 Created: 2019-09-29 Last updated: 2019-12-09Bibliographically approved
Chapman, D., Nilsson, K. L., Rizzo, A. & Larsson, A. (2019). Winter City Urbanism: Enabling All Year Connectivity for Soft Mobility. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(10), Article ID 1820.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Winter City Urbanism: Enabling All Year Connectivity for Soft Mobility
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 10, article id 1820Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores connectivity for soft mobility in the winter season. Working with residents from the sub-arctic city of Luleå, Sweden, the research examines how the interaction between the built environment and winter season affects people’s use of the outdoor environment. The research questions for this study are, 1) how do residents perceive the effects of winter on an areas spatial structure and pattern of streets and pathways? and 2) what enablers and barriers impact resident soft mobility choices and use of the public realm in winter? Methods used were mental mapping and photo elicitation exercises. These were used to gain a better understanding of people’s perception of soft mobility in winter. The results were analysed to identify how soft mobility is influenced by the winter season. The discussion highlights that at the neighbourhood scale, residents perceive that the winter alters an areas spatial structure and pattern of streets and pathways. It was also seen to reduce ease of understanding of the public realm and townscape. In conclusion, it is argued that new and re-tooled town planning strategies, such as extending blue/ green infrastructure planning to include white space could help better enable all year outdoor activity in winter cities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
urban design, soft mobility, walkable environment, physical activity, health outcomes, active living
National Category
Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70506 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16101820 (DOI)000470967500154 ()31121986 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066831352 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-06-27 (johcin);

Artikeln har tidigare förekommit som manuskript i avhandling.

Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Larsson, A. & Chapman, D. (2018). Changing risks to outdoor activity in the Arctic: Resilience to climate-related community change. In: : . Paper presented at The UArctic Congress 2018, Oulu & Helsinki, Finland, September 3-7 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing risks to outdoor activity in the Arctic: Resilience to climate-related community change
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Arctic communities have over generations evolved lifestyles that fit with working and living with local conditions and seasonal variations. With climate change, however, comes evolving and unknown weather’s that these communities need to adapt too. These environmental changes may present new risk and unexpected outcomes to outdoor activity that communities will need to address.

In subarctic regions, pedestrians encounter a variety of road or pavement surface conditions, such as snow, ice, melting ice or mixed icy and snowy surfaces.  Slips and falls are a significant cause of work- and leisure-time accidents. The costs for medical care of fall-related injury treatment is high. Fear can also result in physical inactivity which is a significant population health concern worldwide. 

This presentation highlights the traditional risks associated with outdoor activity in winter and how they are changing with climate change. It does this through the analysis of survey responses about the use of outdoor public space. The survey is from 1) 344 people in the city of Luleå Sweden (Dfc climate classification area), and 2) 325 responses from people living in Dfb and Dfc climate areas across the world, e.g. Canada.

At a societal level, this change suggests that new forms of sustainable development and public policy are needed. These could help reduce costs and pressures on the health services by creating safer and more walkable arctic communities. Here costs and benefits related to inactivity and injury are high and affect both the individual and society as a whole.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Physiotherapy Architectural Engineering
Research subject
Physiotherapy; Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69821 (URN)
Conference
The UArctic Congress 2018, Oulu & Helsinki, Finland, September 3-7 2018
Available from: 2018-06-24 Created: 2018-06-24 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
Pauelsen, M., Vikman, I., Johansson, V., Larsson, A. & Röijezon, U. (2018). Decline in sensorimotor systems explains reduced falls self-efficacy. Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology, 42, 104-110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decline in sensorimotor systems explains reduced falls self-efficacy
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology, ISSN 1050-6411, E-ISSN 1873-5711, Vol. 42, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical performance including balance tasks is one of the main factors explaining the variance in falls self-efficacy in older adults. Balance performance is often measured by use of gross assessment scales, which assess the result of integration of all systems involved in postural control. We aimed to investigate which measurements of postural control correlate to falls self-efficacy scores as measured by the FES-I instrument, and which sensory and motor systems best explain them. A cross sectional study was designed, in which 45 older adults performed quiet stance and limits of stability trials during which their center of pressure (CoP) excursion was recorded. Falls self-efficacy was measured using the Falls Efficacy Scale - International. Eyesight, vestibular function, proprioception, reaction time and strength were also measured. Hierarchical orthogonal projection of latent structures was used to model FES-I with the CoP trials and then with the sensory and muscle function data. Fes-I could be explained to 39%, with the eyes open trials and the limits of stability trials loading the heaviest. The base model could be explained to 40% using the sensory and muscle function data, with lower limb strength, leg proprioception, neck proprioception, reaction time and eyesight loading the heaviest.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70143 (URN)10.1016/j.jelekin.2018.07.001 (DOI)000441876400013 ()30015133 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049755548 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-08-08 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-07-20 Created: 2018-07-20 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Strandkvist, V., Andersson, M., Backman, H., Larsson, A., Stridsman, C. & Lindberg, A. (2018). Hand grip strength is associated with fatigue among men with COPD: epidemiological data from northern Sweden. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hand grip strength is associated with fatigue among men with COPD: epidemiological data from northern Sweden
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate if hand grip strength (HGS) is associated with: 1) fatigue, and specifically clinically relevant fatigue (CRF); 2) low physical activity; and 3) fatigue independent of physical activity level, among individuals with and without COPD. Data were collected from the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) COPD-study in 2014. HGS was measured with a hand-grip dynamometer, fatigue and physical activity were assessed by questionnaires; FACIT-Fatigue respectively IPAQ. Among individuals with COPD (n = 389), but not without COPD (n = 442), HGS was lower among those with CRF than those without CRF, significantly so among men (p = 0.001) and close to among women (p = 0.051). HGS was not associated with physical activity levels within any of the groups. HGS was associated with fatigue among men, but not women, with COPD independent of physical activity level, age, height, and smoking habits (Beta = 0.190, 95% CI 0.061-0.319, respectively Beta = 0.048, 95% CI-0.056-0.152), while there were no corresponding significant findings among individuals without COPD. In summary, HGS was associated with CRF among individuals with COPD in this population-based study. Among men with COPD, HGS was associated with fatigue independent of physical activity level and common confounders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy Nursing
Research subject
Physiotherapy; Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69970 (URN)10.1080/09593985.2018.1486490 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-06-28 Created: 2018-06-28 Last updated: 2019-08-23
Larsson, A. & Chapman, D. (2018). Outdoor human environments: the changing face of climatic barriers to soft mobility and gathering in winter communities. In: : . Paper presented at The 17th International Congress of Circumpolar Health, ICCH17, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 12-15 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outdoor human environments: the changing face of climatic barriers to soft mobility and gathering in winter communities
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: In Arctic regions, generations have evolved lifestyles that fit with working and living with local conditions and seasonal variations. With emerging climate changes new risks appear and prior individual experiences based on preconceptions of risk may not remain valid. In everyday life, soft-mobility is required in varying conditions, such as ice and snow covered surfaces, darkness, extreme weather conditions. Inability to detect environmental clues to risk is a critical aspect for injury. Also, fear and activity avoidance lead to an increased risk of physical inactivity, a significant population health concern worldwide. Methods: An explorative survey, on subjective ratings of barriers to 1) soft mobility and 2) the use of outdoor public space in winter was performed. The EAMQ –Climate survey, tailored for climatic sensitive urban design research, include dimensions of distance, ambient and terrain, and a range of weather conditions found in winter, such as sun, coldness, wind, ice and ground surface properties (ice, snow, slush). Respondents were 1) 344 people in Northern Sweden, and 2) 361 people in Canada and Scandinavia. Results: The results highlight that rain, icy surfaces and darkness are today’s most significant barriers to soft-mobility in winter. For the use of outdoor public spaces, the most significant barriers were slushy and icy surfaces, rain precipitation and darkness. Conclusions: The traditional risks associated with outdoor activity in winter are changing with climate change. Future urban design and planning for safer and more walkable winter cities need to consider a more extensive pallet of weather conditions.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy; Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69820 (URN)
Conference
The 17th International Congress of Circumpolar Health, ICCH17, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 12-15 2018
Note

Poster presentation. Abstract will be included in the abstract book

Available from: 2018-06-24 Created: 2018-06-24 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3619-2297

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