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Krook-Riekkola, AnnaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2601-2558
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Sandberg, E., Toffolo, A. & Krook-Riekkola, A. (2019). A bottom-up study of biomass and electricity use in a fossil free Swedish industry. Energy, 167, 1019-1030
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A bottom-up study of biomass and electricity use in a fossil free Swedish industry
2019 (English)In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 167, p. 1019-1030Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While previous research has focused on single industrial sectors or specific technologies, this study aims to explore the impacts of various industrial technology options on the use of biomass and electricity in a future fossil free Swedish industry. By building a small optimization model, that decomposes each industrial sector into site categories by type and technology to capture critical synergies among industrial processes. The results show important synergies between electrification, biomass and CCS/U (sequestration of CO2 is required to reach net-zero emissions). Reaching an absolute minimum of biomass use within the industry has a very high cost of electricity due to the extensive use of power-to-gas technologies, and minimising electricity has a high cost of biomass due to extensive use of CHP technologies. Meanwhile, integrated bio-refinery processes are the preferable option when minimising the net input of energy. There is, thus, no singular best technology, instead the system adapts to the given circumstances showing the importance of a detailed bottom-up modelling approach and that the decarbonisation of the industry should not be treated as a site-specific problem, but rather as a system-wide problem to allow for optimal utilisation of process synergies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Industry modelling, Energy-intensive industries, Biomass utilisation, CO2 mitigation, Energy transition, Energy system optimisation
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71680 (URN)10.1016/j.energy.2018.11.065 (DOI)000456351800084 ()2-s2.0-85059339023 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-12-05 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Reckien, D., Krook-Riekkola, A. & Heidrich, O. (2019). Dedicated versus mainstreaming approaches in local climate plans in Europe. Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, 112, 948-959
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dedicated versus mainstreaming approaches in local climate plans in Europe
2019 (English)In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 112, p. 948-959Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cities are gaining prominence committing to respond to the threat of climate change, e.g., by developing local climate plans or strategies. However, little is known regarding the approaches and processes of plan development and implementation, or the success and effectiveness of proposed measures. Mainstreaming is regarded as one approach associated with (implementation) success, but the extent of integration of local climate policies and plans in ongoing sectoral and/or development planning is unclear. This paper analyses 885 cities across the 28 European countries to create a first reference baseline on the degree of climate mainstreaming in local climate plans. This will help to compare the benefits of mainstreaming versus dedicated climate plans, looking at policy effectiveness and ultimately delivery of much needed climate change efforts at the city level. All core cities of the European Urban Audit sample were analyzed, and their local climate plans classified as dedicated or mainstreamed in other local policy initiatives. It was found that the degree of mainstreaming is low for mitigation (9% of reviewed cities; 12% of the identified plans) and somewhat higher for adaptation (10% of cities; 29% of plans). In particular horizontal mainstreaming is a major effort for local authorities; an effort that does not necessarily pay off in terms of success of action implementation. This study concludes that climate change issues in local municipalities are best tackled by either, developing a dedicated local climate plan in parallel to a mainstreamed plan or by subsequently developing first the dedicated and later a mainstreaming plan (joint or subsequent “dual track approach”). Cities that currently provide dedicated local climate plans (66% of cities for mitigation; 26% of cities for adaptation) may follow-up with a mainstreaming approach. This promises effective implementation of tangible climate actions as well as subsequent diffusion of climate issues into other local sector policies. The development of only broad sustainability or resilience strategies is seen as critical.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Local climate policy/ planning, Mitigation, Adaptation, Urban areas/ cities, Urban audit, Europe, EU-28, Mainstreaming, Mitigation/ adaptation tracking, Mitigation/ adaptation stocktaking, Monetoring and evaluation (M&E)
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75263 (URN)10.1016/j.rser.2019.05.014 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067828774 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-07-09 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Pardo-García, N., Simoes, S. G., Dias, L., Sandgren, A., Suna, D. & Krook-Riekkola, A. (2019). Sustainable and Resource Efficient Cities platform: SureCity holistic simulation and optimization for smart cities. Journal of Cleaner Production, 215, 701-711
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable and Resource Efficient Cities platform: SureCity holistic simulation and optimization for smart cities
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 215, p. 701-711Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the last decade, professional analytical tools and platforms are increasingly more used to analyse and support decision-making regarding urban energy systems. Most of existing urban energy platforms are focused on short-term analysis (present or 2020) and cover specific sectors and/or aspects, without considering the holistic optimisation of the whole energy system. Moreover, usually these platforms can only be operated by users with high technical skills. This article presents the design and development of the innovative SureCity Platform which aims to overcome existing gaps to support cities to achieve their mid-to-long term sustainability targets. The main novelties the SureCity platform are: (i) it is a transparent and user-friendly software which can also be used by non-technical staff, such as politicians; (ii) it allows assessment of urban policies and measures through holistic optimisation of the whole energy system towards low carbon energy systems including air quality, land-use and water use at city level. Furthermore, since it is based on a generic comprehensive model, the SureCity platform can be adjusted and applied to a large number of cities. Because it is generalised, it has been developed using a participatory approach with different city stakeholders, and since it is designed to be used by users with different levels of expertise, it can also improve communication among city actors and benchmarking with other cities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Sustainable cities, Holistic optimization modelling platform, Mid-to-long energy and environmental strategies, Policy making support
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72639 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.01.070 (DOI)000459358300059 ()2-s2.0-85060924079 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-01-24 (inah)

Available from: 2019-01-21 Created: 2019-01-21 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved
Reckien, D., Krook-Riekkola, A. & Dawson, R. (2018). How are cities planning to respond to climate change?: Assessment of local climate plans from 885 cities in the EU-28. Journal of Cleaner Production, 191, 207-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How are cities planning to respond to climate change?: Assessment of local climate plans from 885 cities in the EU-28
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 191, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Paris Agreement aims to limit global mean temperature rise this century well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. This target has wide-ranging implications for Europe and its cities, which are the source of substantial proportions of greenhouse gas emissions. This paper reports the state of planning for climate change by collecting and analysing local climate mitigation and adaptation plans across 885 urban areas of the EU-28. A typology and analysis framework was developed that classifies local climate plans in terms of their spatial (alignment with local, national and international policy) and sectoral integration (alignment into existing local policy documents). We document local climate plans that we call type A1: non-compulsory by national law and not developed as part of international climate networks; A2: compulsory by national law and not developed as part of international networks; A3: plans developed as part of international networks. This most comprehensive analysis to date reveals that there is large diversity in the availability of local climate plans with most being available in Central and Northern European cities. Approximately 66% of EU cities have an A1, A2, or A3 mitigation plan, 26% an adaptation plan, 17% joint adaptation and mitigation plans, and about 30% lack any form of local climate plan (i.e. what we classify as A1, A2, A3 plans). Mitigation plans are more numerous than adaptation plans, but mitigation does not always precede adaptation. Our analysis reveals that city size, national legislation, and international networks can influence the development of local climate plans. We found that size does matter as about 70% of the cities above 1 million inhabitants have a comprehensive and stand-alone mitigation and/or an adaptation plan (A1 or A2). Countries with national climate legislation (A2), such as Denmark, France, Slovakia and the United Kingdom, are found to have nearly twice as many urban mitigation plans, and five times more likely to produce urban adaptation plans, than countries without such legislation. A1 and A2 mitigation plans are particularly numerous in Denmark, Poland, Germany, and Finland; while A1 and A2 adaptation plans are prevalent in Denmark, Finland, UK and France. The integration of adaptation and mitigation is country-specific and can mainly be observed in countries where local climate plans are compulsory, especially in France and the UK. Finally, local climate plans of international climate networks (A3) are mostly found in the many countries where autonomous, i.e. A1 plans are less common. The findings reported here are of international importance as they will inform and support decision-making and thinking of stakeholders with similar experiences or developments at all levels and sectors in other regions around the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Climate change, Paris agreement, Local climate plans, Cities, Urban areas, Urban audit cities, Europe, Adaptation, Mitigation, Seap/Secap
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68107 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.03.220 (DOI)000435058200020 ()2-s2.0-85046339015 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-05-15 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-03-29 Created: 2018-03-29 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Krook-Riekkola, A. (2018). Modelling ambitious climate targets and long-term strategies for Sweden – Describing the main the challenges: Presentation at The 5th Asian Energy Modelling Workshop Achieving a Sustainable 2050: Insights from Energy System Modelling.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling ambitious climate targets and long-term strategies for Sweden – Describing the main the challenges: Presentation at The 5th Asian Energy Modelling Workshop Achieving a Sustainable 2050: Insights from Energy System Modelling
2018 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim is to share insights from modeling net zero CO2-emission pathways for Sweden from an energy system analysis approach, both with respect to results (how to get to net zero) and to modeling needs (what to include and how to link models). Sweden is a European country rich in biomass and energy intensive industries, thus rich in energy resources but also with challenging freight transports and industries to decarbonize. The model results shows that an increased use of biomass residues and waste heat significantly increase the possibility to meet the targets. TIMES-Sweden, an energy system optimization model of the comprehensive Swedish energy system, was used to explore different low carbon and net zero emission pathways until 2030 and 2045. In order to do so, the model has (and currently is) being updated to include fossil free alternatives to all energy conversion and production processes within the model. When doing so we take a process-oriented approach, thus describe important energy intensive industries (e.g. pulp & paper, iron & steel and cement) in detail. The model is driven by the demand of energy intensive products and services (e.g. heating of single-houses, production of ton steel and person-km in cars). The demand projections were determined by soft-linking TIMES-Sweden with a national CGE model, in which we relied on multiple direction-specific connection points.

Publisher
p. 37
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71417 (URN)
Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2018-11-01
Krook Riekkola, A., Wetterlund, E. & Sandberg, E. (2017). Biomassa, systemmodeller och målkonflikter. Stockholm: Energiforsk
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomassa, systemmodeller och målkonflikter
2017 (Swedish)Report (Refereed)
Alternative title[en]
Biomass, Energy System Models and Conflicting Targets
Abstract [sv]

I denna studie analyseras tillgängligheten av och konkurrensen om biobränsle med ett fjärrvärmeperspektiv. Syftet är att bidra till en breddad systemförståelse av interaktionen mellan fjärrvärmesystemet, skogsbiomassasystemet och biodrivmedelssystemet. Utgångspunkten har varit två energisystemmodeller som på olika sätt fångar konkurrens-en om svensk biomassa. Fokus har varit på att (1) identifiera eventuella målkonflikter mellan ökad elproduktion från fjärrvärme, ökad andel biodrivmedel och minskade koldioxidutsläpp, och (2) identifiera hur modellerna kan kommunicera och vidareutvecklas i syfte att förbättra representationen av biomassa i den nationella energisystemanalysen.

Abstract [en]

The availability and competition for woody biomass has been analysed with a district heating perspective with an aim to contribute to a broader system understanding of the interaction between the district heating system, the forest biomass system and the biofuel system. The starting point has been two energy system models that in different ways capture the competition for biomass in Sweden. The focus has been on (1) identifying possible conflicting targets between increased electricity generation from district heating, increased biofuel production and reduced carbon dioxide emissions, and (2) identifying how the models can communicate and be further developed in order to improve the representation of biomass in the national energy system analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Energiforsk, 2017. p. 78
Series
Energiforskrapport ; 2017:407
Keywords
Energy system models, biomass, TIMES-Sweden, BeWhere Sweden, Energisystemmodeller, biomassa, TIMES-Sweden, BeWhere Sweden
National Category
Energy Systems Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65582 (URN)978-91-7673-407-0 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 37925-1
Available from: 2017-09-11 Created: 2017-09-11 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved
Krook-Riekkola, A., Berg, C., Ahlgren, E. & Söderholm, P. (2017). Challenges in top-down and bottom-up soft linking: Lessons from linking a Swedish energy system model with a CGE model (ed.). Energy, 141, 803-817
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges in top-down and bottom-up soft linking: Lessons from linking a Swedish energy system model with a CGE model
2017 (English)In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 141, p. 803-817Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper proposes and discusses a soft-linking procedure between a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model and an energy system model with the aim to improve national energy policy decision-making. Significant positive and negative experiences are communicated. Specifically, the process of soft-linking the EMEC and TIMES-Sweden models is presented, and unlike previous work we rely on the use of multiple direction-specific connection points. Moreover, the proposed soft-linking methodology is applied in the context of a climate policy scenario for Sweden. The results display a partly new description of the Swedish economy, which when soft-linking, generates lower CO2-emissions in the reference scenario due to a decline in industrial energy demand. These findings point at the importance of linking bottom-up and top-down models when assessing national energy and climate policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Economics Energy Systems
Research subject
Economics; Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65836 (URN)10.1016/j.energy.2017.09.107 (DOI)000426335600067 ()2-s2.0-85030460766 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-12-01 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2017-09-26 Created: 2017-09-26 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, J. & Krook-Riekkola, A. (2017). Supporting Cities’ Emission Mitigation Strategies: Modelling Urban Transports in a TIMES Energy System Modelling Framework. In: S. Ricci;C. A. Brebbia (Ed.), Urban Transport XXIII: . Paper presented at 17th International Conference on Urban Transport and the Environment, Rome, Italy, 5 - 7 September, 2017 (pp. 15-25). Southampton: WIT Press, 176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting Cities’ Emission Mitigation Strategies: Modelling Urban Transports in a TIMES Energy System Modelling Framework
2017 (English)In: Urban Transport XXIII / [ed] S. Ricci;C. A. Brebbia, Southampton: WIT Press, 2017, Vol. 176, p. 15-25Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The transport sector is a significant emitter of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and air pollutants in urban areas. How the transport sector evolve during the coming decades will have significant impact on the possibilities to meet tough climate and environmental targets. This makes transportation an important part of cities’ Sustainable Energy and Climate Action Plans. Still, transportation is somewhat overlooked in many city-level analyses. Energy system optimisation models, like the TIMES modelling framework, are useful tools in identifying energy pathways to reach ambitious energy savings and emission mitigation targets. Based on the identification of urban transport-energy system characteristics, the needs of local governments, and insights from traditional transport models, we propose a partly new representation of the transport sector within a TIMES-City modelling framework, adapting it to the urban transport-energy setting to improve model realism and power of insight. TIMES-City supports analysis of intracity and long-distance passenger and freight transportation, including only the city organisation or the entire administrative city area. Detailed techno-economic-environmental representation of all major existing and emerging modes, technologies a nd fuels p rovides basis for consistent long-term analyses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Southampton: WIT Press, 2017
Series
Wit Transactions on the Built Environment, ISSN 1743-3509 ; 176
Keywords
energy system optimisation model, urban energy system, urban transports, transport-energy setting, TIMES-City, sustainable energy and climate action plan, sustainable urban mobility plans, local energy policy
National Category
Engineering and Technology Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65829 (URN)10.2495/UT170021 (DOI)000450010900002 ()2-s2.0-85039713740 (Scopus ID)978-1-78466-209-7 (ISBN)978-1-78466-210-3 (ISBN)
Conference
17th International Conference on Urban Transport and the Environment, Rome, Italy, 5 - 7 September, 2017
Available from: 2017-09-26 Created: 2017-09-26 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Krook-Riekkola, A. (2016). Bilaga 12: Klimatmålsanalys med TIMES-Sweden: Övergripande klimatmål 2045 i kombination med sektormål 2030. In: En klimat- och luftvårdsstrategi för Sverige: delbetänkande / av Miljömålsberedningen (pp. 429-454). Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bilaga 12: Klimatmålsanalys med TIMES-Sweden: Övergripande klimatmål 2045 i kombination med sektormål 2030
2016 (Swedish)In: En klimat- och luftvårdsstrategi för Sverige: delbetänkande / av Miljömålsberedningen, Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer, 2016, p. 429-454Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer, 2016
Series
Statens offentliga utredningar (SOU), ISSN 0375-250X ; 2016:47
National Category
Energy Systems Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-61365 (URN)978-91-38-24469-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-10 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Wårell, L. & Krook-Riekkola, A. (2016). Resource efficiency in a district heating context. In: Meeting Sweden's current and future energy challenges, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2016: . Paper presented at Swedish Association for Energy Economics (SAEE) conference 2016, Luleå, August 23-24 2016. Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resource efficiency in a district heating context
2016 (English)In: Meeting Sweden's current and future energy challenges, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2016, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2016
National Category
Energy Engineering Economics
Research subject
Energy Engineering; Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-61059 (URN)
Conference
Swedish Association for Energy Economics (SAEE) conference 2016, Luleå, August 23-24 2016
Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2601-2558

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