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Blecken, Godecke-TobiasORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5548-4397
Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
Søberg, L., Winston, R., Viklander, M. & Blecken, G.-T. (2019). Dissolved metal adsorption capacities and fractionation in filter materials for use in stormwater bioretention facilities. Water Research X, 4, Article ID 100032.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dissolved metal adsorption capacities and fractionation in filter materials for use in stormwater bioretention facilities
2019 (English)In: Water Research X, ISSN 2589-9147, Vol. 4, article id 100032Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dissolved metal adsorption and association was determined for ten different filter materials recommended and/or implemented in bioretention facilities. Batch adsorption and batch kinetic experiments were performed at lab-scale using both single and multi-metal solutions. Metal strengths and association were determined by sequential extraction analysis. All materials adsorbed metals and 90% of adsorption occurred within 1 h. However, as metal solutions became more complex, adsorption behavior changed. Generally, filter materials classified as sand with a naturally high pH, relatively low organic matter (OM) content and large specific surface area seem to be good choices for removing dissolved metals. Additionally, a chalk additive might improve metal adsorption whereas biochar did not significantly improve metal retention and may be an unwanted (due to degradation over time) extra source of OM. Regardless of filter material, metals primarily adsorbed to the exchangeable form which indicates that metal adsorption might not be permanent, but rather substantially reversible in some cases. More research is needed to assess whether dissolved metals adsorbed in filter materials of bioretention systems pose a delayed threat instead of an immediate threat. Finally, the authors strongly recommend filter materials intended for stormwater bioretention facilities to be tested prior to implementation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Filter material, Biofilter, Heavy metals, Metal fractionation, Filter media
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73666 (URN)10.1016/j.wroa.2019.100032 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065547443 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-06-25 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Søberg, L., Viklander, M., Blecken, G.-T. & Hedström, A. (2019). Reduction of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalisand Pseudomonas aeruginosa in stormwater bioretention: Effect of drying, temperature and submerged zone. Journal of Hydrology X, 3, Article ID 100025.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduction of Escherichia coliEnterococcus faecalisand Pseudomonas aeruginosa in stormwater bioretention: Effect of drying, temperature and submerged zone
2019 (English)In: Journal of Hydrology X, ISSN 2589-9155, Vol. 3, article id 100025Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The impact of drying and temperature on the reduction of Escherichia coliEnterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in stormwater bioretention systems with and without a submerged zone was assessed using 16 pilot-scale bioretention columns under controlled laboratory conditions. The experimental design enabled analysis of possible interactions between the factors. First outflow and event-based samples were collected. Outflow concentrations were independent of inflow concentrations and hence controlled by internal processes. Overall TSS removal was high but sensitive to bacterial synthesis. Event-based samples had significantly higher bacteria concentrations than first outflow samples, suggesting that remaining/surviving bacteria in the bioretention cells have little effect on initial peak outflow concentrations. The effect of temperature varied between bacterial species and sample types. Long dry periods seemed beneficial for bacteria reduction, but outflow bacteria concentrations peaked during the second watering after long dry periods. Submerged zones significantly reduced bacteria outflow concentrations. However, sudden temperature increases caused bioretention cells with a submerged zone to produce significantly higher bacteria outflow concentrations than before the temperature increase, which was not the case for standard cells. Bioretention cells with submerged zones may thus be poor choices for reducing bacterial concentrations in stormwater runoff in areas experiencing winter conditions. Finally, our results suggest that adsorption (e.g. further enhanced by biofilm formation) is the major mechanism governing bacteria reduction in bioretention systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Bacteria, Submerged zone, Stormwater, Bioretention, Winter performance, Wet and dry periods
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73082 (URN)10.1016/j.hydroa.2019.100025 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-01 Created: 2019-03-01 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Tondera, K., Blecken, G.-T., Tournebize, J., Viklander, M., Österlund, H., Andersson-Wikström, A. & Tanner, C. C. (2018). Emerging Contaminants: Occurrence, Treatment Efficiency and Accumulation Under Varying Flows. In: Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner (Ed.), Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows: (pp. 93-109). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emerging Contaminants: Occurrence, Treatment Efficiency and Accumulation Under Varying Flows
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2018 (English)In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 93-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Emerging contaminants became a major topic in water treatment when laboratory detection methods for concentrations at a nanogram-scale improved approximately two decades ago. Research on using ecotechnologies to remove emerging contaminants in variable stormwater and wastewater flows has been conducted for more than a decade, but so far, not all removal mechanisms are well understood and only few setups have been investigated. This chapter summarises the current knowledge, focussing on pesticides and emerging contaminants listed on the watch list of the European Union. However, large-scale investigations are still rare and further research will have to be conducted in this field to enable practitioners to provide recommendations for design and maintenance of treatment facilities in the field of ecotechnologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
SpringerBriefs in Water Science and Technology, ISSN 2194-7244, E-ISSN 2194-7252
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66683 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-70013-7_6 (DOI)978-3-319-70012-0 (ISBN)978-3-319-70013-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Tondera, K., Tanner, C. C., Chazarenc, F. & Blecken, G.-T. (2018). Introduction. In: Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner (Ed.), Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows: (pp. 1-6). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2018 (English)In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 1-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
SpringerBriefs in Water Science and Technology, ISSN 2194-7244
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66687 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-70013-7_1 (DOI)978-3-319-70012-0 (ISBN)978-3-319-70013-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Blecken, G.-T., Tondera, K., Österlund, H. & Viklander, M. (2018). Metals: Occurrence, Treatment Efficiency and Accumulation Under Varying Flows. In: Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner (Ed.), Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows: (pp. 75-91). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metals: Occurrence, Treatment Efficiency and Accumulation Under Varying Flows
2018 (English)In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 75-91Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Metals were the first priority pollutants to be widely investigated in stormwater. In solid phase, they are often attached to very fine particles. The dissolved fraction creates considerable environmental problems as it is the most bioavailable fraction. Hence, removal of both fine and dissolved particles plays a major role in the treatment of polluted runoff. Ecotechnologies specifically designed to remove metals should be able to address different treatment mechanisms. However, the exhaustion of sorption capacity reduces the lifespan of treatment facilities. Additionally, metal concentrations fluctuate extremely—spatially, seasonally and over time—which poses another challenge for further increasing removal efficiencies. While soil- or sand-based systems should be designed in a way that the filter material can be exchanged, newer developments such as Floating Treatment Wetlands show promising removal capacities as the installations bind metals in sludge sediments, which can be removed from time to time. The different treatment mechanisms, aforementioned developments and techniques as well as their removal capacities will be discussed in this chapter

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
SpringerBriefs in Water Science and Technology, ISSN 2194-7244, E-ISSN 2194-7252
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66676 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-70013-7_5 (DOI)978-3-319-70012-0 (ISBN)978-3-319-70013-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Stott, R., Tondera, K., Blecken, G.-T. & Schreiber, C. (2018). Microbial Loads and Removal Efficiency Under Varying Flows. In: Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner (Ed.), Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows: (pp. 57-74). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial Loads and Removal Efficiency Under Varying Flows
2018 (English)In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 57-74Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A variety of ecotechnologies have shown promising yet variable results in reducing faecal microbial contaminants under challenging operational conditions. But relatively limited work has been conducted to investigate and understand faecal microbe removal in these systems under highly fluctuating hydraulic and contaminant loading. In most instances, ecotechnology-based systems such as sedimentation ponds, constructed wetlands and bioretention filters have proved effective for treating episodic discharges and demonstrated performance resilience removing faecal microbial contaminants with modest to good efficiency particularly where inflow concentrations are high. However, microbial removal may depend greatly on the type of microorganism, treatment system design and operational factors. Design characteristics such as type of filter material and depth, presence of a submerged zone, type of vegetation and operational conditions such as inflow concentration, and antecedent dry periods in combination with temperature changes can all affect the removal of faecal microbes. Factors influencing survival, fate and behaviour of retained faecal microbes are still poorly understood. These knowledge gaps need addressing in order to fully evaluate microbial removal from fluctuating contaminated flows and more accurately interpret faecal indicator bacteria-based water quality and potential health risks associated with discharge from these ecotechnology-based systems

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
SpringerBriefs in Water Science and Technology, ISSN 2194-7244, E-ISSN 2194-7252
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66684 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-70013-7_4 (DOI)978-3-319-70012-0 (ISBN)978-3-319-70013-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Tondera, K., Blecken, G.-T., Tournebize, J., Mander, Ü. & Tanner, C. C. (2018). Nutrient Removal from Variable Stormwater Flows. In: Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner (Ed.), Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows: (pp. 31-55). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nutrient Removal from Variable Stormwater Flows
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2018 (English)In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 31-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When nutrient loads are discharged into surface waters with variable stormwater and wastewater flows, surface water pollution is impaired. Nutrients can lead to oxygen depletion and eutrophication of surface waters, including excessive plant and algae growth. Popular examples of structures harmed by excessive nutrient inflow are the Baltic Sea or the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. Hence, removing nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus compounds, is a major target when variable flows should be treated. This chapter gives an overview of the available removal mechanisms and the potential efficiencies of different treatment facilities. While particle-bound nutrients can be removed via sedimentation processes, dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus compounds cannot as they differ in their biochemical degradation: the adsorption capacity for nitrogen compounds is often renewable, whereas the uptake of phosphorus compounds is limited over time. Hence, treatment facilities need to be able to address the different requirements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
SpringerBriefs in Water Science and Technology, ISSN 2194-7244, E-ISSN 2194-7252
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66677 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-70013-7_3 (DOI)978-3-319-70012-0 (ISBN)978-3-319-70013-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Tondera, K., Blecken, G.-T., Chazarenc, F., Lucke, T. & Tanner, C. C. (2018). Treatment Techniques for Variable Flows. In: Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner (Ed.), Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows: (pp. 7-30). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treatment Techniques for Variable Flows
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2018 (English)In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 7-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A wide range of ecotechnologies has been applied to treatment of variable stormwater and wastewater flows. Stormwater ponds and basins were already introduced as common ‘end-of-the-pipe’ treatment solutions in the 1960s, almost parallel to the first attempts to develop structured wastewater treatment with the help of plants, inspired by natural wetlands. Constructed wetlands specifically designed for the treatment of variable flows emerged in the 1990s and were joined by a growing group of vegetated filter systems, named bioretention filters, raingardens or retention soil filters, all following the principle of gravity-driven wastewater filtration. This chapter provides a general overview of these treatment facilities, including swales and buffer strips. Although the latter ones are gravity-driven filtration systems, they are commonly used for the treatment of road runoff and are highly adapted to fit into their landscape structure, they are described in a separate section. Each section includes references to detailed design and operation guidelines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
SpringerBriefs in Water Science and Technology, ISSN 2194-7244, E-ISSN 2194-7252
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66686 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-70013-7_2 (DOI)978-3-319-70012-0 (ISBN)978-3-319-70013-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Søberg, L., Viklander, M. & Blecken, G.-T. (2017). Do salt and low temperature impair metal treatment in stormwater bioretention cells with or without a submerged zone?. Science of the Total Environment, 579, 1588-1599
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do salt and low temperature impair metal treatment in stormwater bioretention cells with or without a submerged zone?
2017 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 579, p. 1588-1599Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although seasonal temperature changes and (road) salt in winter and/or coastal stormwater runoff might interfere with the metal treatment performance of stormwater bioretention cells, no previous study has evaluated the effect of these factors and their interactions under controlled conditions. In this 18 week long study 24 well established pilot-scale bioretention columns were employed to evaluate the individual and combined effect(s) of low/high temperature, salt and presence of a submerged zone with an embedded carbon source on metal removal using a three factor, two-level full factorial experimental design. In most instances, the three factors significantly influenced the metal outflow concentrations and thus the treatment performance; the effect of temperature depended on the metal in question, salt had an overall negative effect and the submerged zone with carbon source had an overall positive effect. Despite these statistically significant effects, the discharge water quality was generally markedly improved. However, leaching of dissolved Cu and Pb did occur, mainly from bioretention cells dosed with salt-containing stormwater. The highest concentrations of metals were captured in the top layer of the filter material and were not significantly affected by the three factors studied. Overall, the results confirmed that bioretention provides a functioning stormwater treatment option in areas experiencing winter conditions (road salt, low temperatures) or coastal regions (salt-laden stormwater). However, validation of these results in the field is recommended, especially focusing on dissolved metal removal, which may be critically affected under certain conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-61078 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.179 (DOI)000393320400058 ()27919558 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85007454220 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-03-03 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-12-15 Created: 2016-12-15 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Al-Rubaei, A. M., Engström, M., Viklander, M. & Blecken, G.-T. (2017). Effectiveness of a 19-Year Old Combined Pond-Wetland System in Removing Particulate and Dissolved Pollutants. Wetlands (Wilmington, N.C.), 37(3), 485-496
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of a 19-Year Old Combined Pond-Wetland System in Removing Particulate and Dissolved Pollutants
2017 (English)In: Wetlands (Wilmington, N.C.), ISSN 0277-5212, E-ISSN 1943-6246, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 485-496Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study monitored the stormwater runoff quantity and quality treatment performance of a 6.8 ha 19-year old combined pond-wetland system, located in south Sweden, over one year. The mean volume reductions for 53 storm events for the pond and wetland were 40% and 28%, respectively, while the mean flow reductions were 60% and 76%, respectively. Pollutant concentrations in the influent to the wetland were highly variable. The pond-wetland system could efficiently remove an average of 91%, 80%, 94%, 91%, 83% and 92% of TSS, TP, particulate Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn, respectively, whereas the removal of particulate and dissolved Ni was highly variable with an average of 67% ± 62% and −5% ± 41%, respectively. The removal of TN, NH4-N and NO3 + NO2-N was highly variable with an average of 45% ± 27%, 12% ± 96% and 45% ± 43%, respectively. These removal percentages are high in comparison to other studies and underline that relatively old systems can also provide efficient treatment. Although the pond accounted for a substantial reduction of pollutant concentration, the wetland significantly enhanced both the treatment performance and the peak flow reduction. This underlines that a combined pond/wetland system is a more beneficial solution than a pond only. The pollutant removal efficiency was significantly influenced by some factors including Antecedent Dry Days, seasonal variations, air temperature, retention times, rainfall depth and duration, and peak rainfall intensity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62268 (URN)10.1007/s13157-017-0884-6 (DOI)000403573000008 ()2-s2.0-85014039169 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-06-27 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2017-03-02 Created: 2017-03-02 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5548-4397

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