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Lindqvist, Anna-KarinORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3145-7698
Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Lindqvist, A.-K., Löf, M., Ek, A. & Rutberg, S. (2020). Addendum: Active School Transportation in Winter Conditions: Biking Together is Warmer [Letter to the editor]. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(5), Article ID 1524.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addendum: Active School Transportation in Winter Conditions: Biking Together is Warmer
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 5, article id 1524Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78757 (URN)10.3390/ijerph17051524 (DOI)000522389200064 ()
Note

Addendum in: International Journal of Enviromental Research and Public Health, vol. 16, iss. 2, article no. 234, DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16020234

Godkänd;2020;Nivå 0;2020-05-04 (alebob)

Available from: 2020-05-04 Created: 2020-05-04 Last updated: 2020-05-04Bibliographically approved
Rutberg, S., Nyberg, L., Castelli, D. & Lindqvist, A.-K. (2020). Grit as Perseverance in Physical Activity Participation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(3), Article ID 807.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grit as Perseverance in Physical Activity Participation
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 3, article id 807Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Childhood is a critical period for the acquisition of healthy behaviors, and the promotion of sustainable healthy behavior among children is greatly important. Therefore, an increased understanding of the relationship between grit and physical activity in a school context is needed. The purpose of this study is to describe and develop an understanding of students’ and teachers’ awareness and experiences concerning grit as a health-promoting factor. Fifty-five students and three teachers participated in the study. Data were collected through the Short Grit Scale and focus group interviews. There were weak to non-significant correlations between the three teachers’ ratings of their students’ grit and the children’s own ratings. The qualitative results show that children and teachers understood the construct of grit but had slightly different perceptions of it and that grit is not considered to be set in stone. The participants made an association between grit, motivation, meaningfulness, and setting goals. The findings indicate that grit might be an ideal target for making physical activity interventions sustainable.

Keywords
Physical activity, Grit, Children
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-77665 (URN)10.3390/ijerph17030807 (DOI)000517783300132 ()32012973 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078837254 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2018-04174
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-02-18 (johcin)

Available from: 2020-02-07 Created: 2020-02-07 Last updated: 2020-04-22Bibliographically approved
Lindqvist, A.-K., Löf, M., Ek, A. & Rutberg, S. (2019). Active School Transportation in Winter Conditions: Biking Together is Warmer. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(2), Article ID 234.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Active School Transportation in Winter Conditions: Biking Together is Warmer
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 2, article id 234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There has been a decline in children’s use of active school transportation (AST) while there is also limited research concerning AST in winter conditions. This study aimed to explore the prerequisites and experiences of schoolchildren and parents participating in an empowerment- and gamification-inspired intervention to promote students’ AST in winter conditions. Methods: Thirty-five students, who were aged 12–13 years, and 34 parents from the north of Sweden participated in the study. Data were collected using photovoice and open questions in a questionnaire and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The results show that involvement and togetherness motivated the students to use AST. In addition, during the project, the parents changed to have more positive attitudes towards their children’s use of AST. The students reported that using AST during wintertime is strenuous but rewarding and imparts a sense of pride. Conclusion: Interventions for increasing students’ AST in winter conditions should focus on the motivational aspects for both children and parents. For overcoming parental hesitation with regards to AST during winter, addressing their concerns and empowering the students are key factors. To increase the use of AST all year around, targeting the challenges perceived during the winter is especially beneficial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
active school transportation, children, empowerment, health promotion, parents, photovoice, physical activity
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72580 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16020234 (DOI)000459112100069 ()30650653 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060168919 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-01-30 (svasva)

Available from: 2019-01-16 Created: 2019-01-16 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Rutberg, S. & Lindqvist, A.-K. (2019). Children’s motivation overcame parental hesitation: active school transportation in Sweden. Health Promotion International, 34(6), 1149-1156
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children’s motivation overcame parental hesitation: active school transportation in Sweden
2019 (English)In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1149-1156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract

To meet the recommendation of 60 min of daily physical activity, children can be encouraged to walk or bike to school, which is known as active school transportation (AST). The aim of this study was to describe parents’ attitudes to AST and to explore their experience when implementing interventions to promote it. To explore parent’s experiences, we collected pre- and post-intervention data via three questionnaires, using both closed and open questioning techniques. The pre-intervention questionnaire informed development of the intervention. Open-ended questions (pre- and post-) were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. In the intervention, there were 42 children, with 63 parents answering pre-intervention questionnaires and 44 answering a post-intervention questionnaire. The analysis resulted in one main theme: children’s motivation and active travel reduces parents’ perception of problems, along with three subthemes: parental concerns and suggestions for solutions, children’s motivation guides parental choice of transport mode, and trying it changes attitudes. In conclusion, it is beneficial to use the enthusiasm and motivation of children to overcome parental hesitation with AST. In addition, it is critical to acknowledge their concerns, as they are the gatekeepers to the children’s use of AST and it is valuable to empower parents when designing relevant interventions. Interventions to increase AST could preferably target changed behavior, and parents’ confidence in their children’s ability to use active transport in a safe and effective way, vs focusing on changing parental attitudes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
children, active transport, empowerment, health behavior, parent
National Category
Health Sciences Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71387 (URN)10.1093/heapro/day083 (DOI)000514902600014 ()30376064 (PubMedID)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-01-13 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
Lindqvist, A.-K. (2019). Cykelväg till skolan kan vara vägen till framgång. Skolledaren (3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cykelväg till skolan kan vara vägen till framgång
2019 (Swedish)In: Skolledaren, ISSN 0037-6515, no 3Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kalmar: Sveriges Skolledarförbund, 2019
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73823 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-03 Created: 2019-05-03 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Ek, A., Sandborg, J., Delisle Nyström, C., Lindqvist, A.-K., Rutberg, S. & Löf, M. (2019). Physical Activity and Mobile Phone Apps in the Preschool Age: Perceptions of Teachers and Parents. JMIR mhealth and uhealth, 7(4), Article ID e12512.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Activity and Mobile Phone Apps in the Preschool Age: Perceptions of Teachers and Parents
Show others...
2019 (English)In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 7, no 4, article id e12512Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Physical activity (PA) is already beneficial at the preschool age. In many countries, young children spend most of their days in the preschool setting, making it a common arena for PA interventions. Mobile health tools are becoming increasingly popular to promote PA in different populations; however, little is known about the interest for and how the preschool setting could incorporate such a tool.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to examine how teachers and parents perceive PA in preschool-aged children in general and their perceptions of how a mobile phone app could be used to promote PA in the preschool setting.

METHODS:

Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 teachers (93%, [14/15] women, mean age 43.5 years, 47%, [7/15] with a university degree and 10 parents [91%, 9/10] women, mean age 38.9 years, all with a university degree) recruited from 2 urban preschools in central Sweden. The interviews were recorded, fully transcribed, coded, and analyzed using thematic analysis by means of an inductive approach.

RESULTS:

The analysis revealed 4 themes: (1) children are physically active by nature, (2) the environment as a facilitator or a barrier, (3) prerequisites of the adult world, and (4) an app in the preschool setting-challenges and possibilities. Parents and teachers perceived preschoolers as being spontaneously physically active; however, high-intensity PA was perceived as low. The PA was specifically performed during the day in the preschool. Identified facilitators of PA were access to safe and engaging outdoor environments such as forests, spacious indoor areas, and adult involvement. Adult involvement was considered especially important for children preferring sedentary activities. Identified barriers for PA were restricted indoor and outdoor space, rules for indoor activities, and lack of adult involvement because of time constraints. The teachers perceived that they had limited skills and experiences using apps in general, although they also acknowledged the increasing role of technological tools in the curriculum. Thus, the teachers expressed an interest for an app designed as a support tool for them, especially for situations when PA was limited because of perceived barriers. They suggested the app to include accessible information regarding the health benefits of PA in children linked to a library of activities for different settings and seasons. Parents suggested interactive app features including problem-solving tasks and music and dance, but not video clips as they made children passive.

CONCLUSIONS:

Vigorous PA was perceived as low in preschool-aged children. Future tailoring of interventions in the preschool setting should work around barriers and support facilitators to PA, especially PA of high intensity. In such work, an app could serve as a source of inspiration for PA in different ages, settings, and seasons and thus reduce environmental and structural inequalities in the preschool setting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications, 2019
Keywords
child, preschool, mHealth, parents, physical activity, qualitative research, school teachers
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73704 (URN)10.2196/12512 (DOI)000465355100001 ()30994465 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066460114 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-05-14 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Mikaelsson, K., Rutberg, S., Lindqvist, A.-K. & Michaelson, P. (2019). Physically inactive adolescents’ experiences of engaging in physical activity. European Journal of Physiotherapy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physically inactive adolescents’ experiences of engaging in physical activity
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study aimed to describe physically inactive adolescents’ experiences and reflections about engaging in physical activity. Methods: Nine graduate students from the third year of upper secondary school (six women and three men) participated in this study. Narrative interviews were used for data collection and qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. Results: The analysis revealed three themes ‘Acknowledging resistance and barriers to performing physical activity’, ‘Knowing that it is good is not enough’, and ‘Feeling included and accepted is fun and motivating’. These themes show that the adolescent’s experienced barriers, acknowledged pros and cons and identified possibilities to be physically active. Conclusions: Identifying experiences that impact on inactive adolescents’ attitude and willingness to perform physical activity can be useful to understand the needs of the individual. By relating these experiences to the different stages of the transtheoretical model, this study could provide valuable knowledge for designing future interventions to enhance physical activity in this target group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72932 (URN)10.1080/21679169.2019.1567808 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-18 Created: 2019-02-18 Last updated: 2019-02-18
Lindqvist, A.-K., Forsberg, H., Savolainen, E. & Rutberg, S. (2019). The road to sucess- Aktiva skoltransporter. In: : . Paper presented at Fysioterapidagarna- Symposium.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The road to sucess- Aktiva skoltransporter
2019 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Endast omkring 30% av svenska barn når rekommendationen för fysisk aktivitet och bara hälften av barnen använder aktiva skoltransporter (AST). Förutom den samhälleliga utmaningen som detta innebär för barns hälsa och kognitiv förmåga, har det också en negativ inverkan på klimatet och trafiksäkerhet nära skolorna. Dessutom följer barns fysiska vanor med in i vuxenlivet och därmed har den fysiska inaktiviteten på sikt en betydande hälsoekonomisk negativ effekt. Vi arbetar med ett skolbaserat koncept som bygger på empowerment och gamification. Det slutgiltiga målet är en innovativ digital lösning för en hållbar beteendeförändring avseende AST och att implementeringen av innovationen ökar användandet av AST bland svenska barn från dagens 52% till 80%.

Lärandemål:

Hur fysioterapeuter kan använda empowerment och gamification för att öka barns fysiska aktivitet

Kunskap om beteendevetenskapliga teorier och modeller som påverkar interventionen

Erfarenheter att som fysioterapeut leda ett skolbaserat projekt

Föreläsare:

Anna-Karin Lindqvist, Stina Rutberg, Hanna Forsberg och Eva Savolainen från Luleå Tekniska Universitet som forskar om barn och fysisk aktivitet.

Aktuella publikationer:

Lindqvist, A-K. Löf, M. Ek, A., & Rutberg S. (2019) Active School Transportation in Winter Conditions – Biking Together is Warmer. International Journal of Enviromental Research and Public Health.

Lindqvist A-K, Castelli D, Hallberg J, Rutberg S. (2018) The praise and price of Pokémon GO: A qualitative study of children’s and parents’ experiences. JMIR Serious Games

Rutberg, S. & Lindqvist, A-K. (2018) Active School Transportation an Investment in School Health. Health Behavior and Policy Review.

Lindqvist, A-K & Rutberg, S. (2018) One step forward: The development of a program promoting active school transportation. JMIR Research Protocols.

Rutberg, S & Lindqvist, A-K (2018) Children´s motivation overcame parental hesitation - Active school transportation in Sweden. Health Promotion International

National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76952 (URN)
Conference
Fysioterapidagarna- Symposium
Available from: 2019-11-29 Created: 2019-11-29 Last updated: 2019-11-29
Kostenius, C., Hallberg, J. & Lindqvist, A.-K. (2018). Gamification of health education: Schoolchildren’s participation in the development of a serious game to promote health and learning. Health Education, 118(4), 354-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gamification of health education: Schoolchildren’s participation in the development of a serious game to promote health and learning
2018 (English)In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 354-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The use of modern technology has many challenges and risks. However, by collaborating with schoolchildren, ideas to effectively promote health and learning in school can be identified. This study aimed to examine how a participatory approach can deepen the understanding of how schoolchildren relate to and use gamification as a tool to promote physical activity and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Inspired by the concept and process of empowerment and child participation, the methodological focus of this study was on consulting schoolchildren. During a 2-month period, 18 schoolchildren (10–12-years-old) participated in workshops to create game ideas that would motivate them to be physically active and learn in school.

Findings

The phenomenological analysis resulted in one main theme, ‘Playing games for fun to be the best I can be’. This consisted of four themes with two sub-themes each. The findings offer insights on how to increase physical activity and health education opportunities using serious games in school.

Originality/value

The knowledge gained provides gamification concepts and combinations of different technological applications to increase health and learning, as well as motivational aspects suggested by the schoolchildren. The findings are discussed with health promotion and health education in mind.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
National Category
Other Health Sciences Physiotherapy Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Health Science; Physiotherapy; Pervasive Mobile Computing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68485 (URN)10.1108/HE-10-2017-0055 (DOI)2-s2.0-85047988587 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-06-01 (svasva)

Available from: 2018-04-24 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Lindqvist, A.-K. & Rutberg, S. (2018). One Step Forward: Development of a Program Promoting Active School Transportation. JMIR Research Protocols, 7(5), Article ID e123.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One Step Forward: Development of a Program Promoting Active School Transportation
2018 (English)In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 7, no 5, article id e123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Physical activity promotes health and learning. However, up to 80% of the children in industrialized countries do not achieve the recommended level of daily physical activity. By encouraging children to use active school transportation (AST), it is possible to increase their overall physical activity.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to present the development of an AST intervention using Intervention Mapping (IM) to promote children's physical activity.

METHODS: The principles of IM were applied to guide the development of the intervention. The process was divided into 3 phases. First, a literature review and collection of experiences of stakeholders were carried out to gain a broad perspective on the problem and possible solutions. Thereafter, an analysis of the critical environmental and behavioral factors affecting outcome was conducted, which guided the choice of tangible components of the intervention. Finally, a plan of evaluation and implementation was established.

RESULTS: A structured program to increase AST among children was developed, consisting of 3 subsequent phases that are described in detail. Implementation took place, and evaluation of the intervention is being carried out.

CONCLUSIONS: IM proved to be a valuable method to develop a structured AST intervention for children. By following the steps of the IM process, it became evident that empowerment and gamification are 2 promising avenues to consider when designing AST interventions in a school context. By engaging end users and including important agents, such as parents and teachers, who control the environmental factors, the possibility to design a sustainable program increases. In addition, gamification made it possible to integrate learning into AST, which could motivate schools to devote time and effort to implementing this program.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68707 (URN)10.2196/resprot.9505 (DOI)29739733 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047530732 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-05-14 (svasva)

Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3145-7698

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