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Publications (10 of 40) Show all publications
Nykänen, A., Johnsson, R. & Aråker, J. (2019). Rendering Environmental Noise Planning Models in Virtual Reality. In: Proceedings of the ICA 2019 and EAA Euregio: 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, integrating 4th EAA Euroregio 2019. Paper presented at 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9-13 September, 2019, Aachen, Germany (pp. 6424-6431). Aachen
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rendering Environmental Noise Planning Models in Virtual Reality
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the ICA 2019 and EAA Euregio: 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, integrating 4th EAA Euroregio 2019, Aachen, 2019, p. 6424-6431Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In building and infrastructure projects sound design and requirement specification are often complicated by difficulties in understanding how the planned built environment will sound. Information about sounds is almost exclusively provided as sound pressure levels and sound reduction indices. It is difficult to understand how an environment will be perceived solely based on such data. VR models with sound give an experience much easier to comprehend. In this study, VR models were developed based on first order Ambisonics recordings. Such recordings provide spatial information and can be real time rendered based on the listener’s orientation. However, the recordings must be made in discrete points and therefore a model for cross-fading and mixing was developed. Recordings of road and railway sounds were made in a two dimensional grid and mixed and crossfaded based on the position of the listener. The sound levels were adjusted to match calculated levels from noise planning models. The spatial density of the grid of recordings, the cross-fading function, and the mix of recordings were varied and the realism of the models was assessed in listening tests. The results give guidance on how Ambisonics recordings could be mixed in order to achieve realistic sound in VR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aachen: , 2019
Series
International Congress on Acoustics, ISSN 2226-7808, E-ISSN 2415-1599
Keywords
Ambisonics, Auralisation, VR, Noise Planning
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78877 (URN)
Conference
23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9-13 September, 2019, Aachen, Germany
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , SM17-0023
Note

ISBN för värdpublikation: 978-3-939296-15-7

Available from: 2020-05-14 Created: 2020-05-14 Last updated: 2020-05-18Bibliographically approved
Nykänen, A., Fagerlönn, J., Lindberg, S., Johnsson, R. & Ramanathan, S. K. (2019). Sounds for Enhancing Energy Efficient Driving: A Simulator Pre-Study. In: Proceedings of the ICA 2019 and EAA Euroregio: 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, integrating 4th EAA Euroregio 2019. Paper presented at 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9-13 September, 2019, Aachen, Germany (pp. 5182-5189). Aachen: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Akustik e.V. (DEGA)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sounds for Enhancing Energy Efficient Driving: A Simulator Pre-Study
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the ICA 2019 and EAA Euroregio: 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, integrating 4th EAA Euroregio 2019, Aachen: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Akustik e.V. (DEGA) , 2019, p. 5182-5189Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Computer game technology was used for rapid prototyping of a sound based interface encouraging truck drivers to drive energy efficiently. The design process was inspired by user-centred agile methods. Interior sounds were made interactive by actively controlling them based on speed, engine speed, torque and acceleration. User feedback was collected at an early stage through contextual enquiry sessions during simulated driving. Based on the feedback the sounds were adjusted and effects on driver behaviour were measured in a simulator experiment. The effects on driver behaviour were small and not statistically significant (p>.05). However, assessments of preference and informativeness showed statistically significant differences between the design concepts (p<.05). The qualitative part of the study showed that the use of game technology for enabling assessment of interactive sounds in early design phases was useful and allowed for getting users into the loop early on. The framework was found to be suitable for designing interactive sounds, and the data collected provides insight into driver responses to using active noise control as a means for providing information to the driver.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aachen: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Akustik e.V. (DEGA), 2019
Series
International Congress on Acoustics, ISSN 2415-1599, E-ISSN 2226-7808
Keywords
auditory display, active noise control, user-centred design
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78878 (URN)
Conference
23rd International Congress on Acoustics, 9-13 September, 2019, Aachen, Germany
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 42611-1
Note

ISBN för värdpublikation: 978-3-939296-15-7

Available from: 2020-05-14 Created: 2020-05-14 Last updated: 2020-05-18Bibliographically approved
Johnsson, R. (2018). Acoustic vehicle alerting systems: Will they affect the acceptance of electric vehicles?. In: : . Paper presented at 2018 International Audio Mostly Conference - A Conference on Interaction with Sound: Sound in Immersion and Emotion, AM 2018; Wrexham; United Kingdom; 12-14 September 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acoustic vehicle alerting systems: Will they affect the acceptance of electric vehicles?
2018 (English)Conference paper (Refereed)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72848 (URN)
Conference
2018 International Audio Mostly Conference - A Conference on Interaction with Sound: Sound in Immersion and Emotion, AM 2018; Wrexham; United Kingdom; 12-14 September 2018
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-02-11
Öqvist, R., Ljunggren, F. & Johnsson, R. (2018). Walking sound annoyance vs. impact sound insulation from 20 Hz. Applied Acoustics, 135, 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Walking sound annoyance vs. impact sound insulation from 20 Hz
2018 (English)In: Applied Acoustics, ISSN 0003-682X, E-ISSN 1872-910X, Vol. 135, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a need to develop single number quantities (SNQ) of impact sound insulation that correlate better with walking sound annoyance. Previous research has indicated that impact sound insulation should be evaluated from 20 Hz in lightweight constructions, using modified spectrum adaptation terms. The purpose of our study was to verify whether frequencies between 20 and 50 Hz are important for perceived walking sound annoyance and to verify whether the proposed spectrum adaptation terms improve correlation with perceived walking sound annoyance. Binaural recordings of walking sound in one heavy and one lightweight construction were evaluated in a two-part listening test. The need to include frequencies from 20 Hz when evaluating lightweight constructions was verified. Both tested constructions achieved similar performance in terms of LnT,w and LnT,w + CI,50-2500, while a significant mismatch in the rated annoyance was observed. The correlation between SNQ and subjective response was considerably improved, when the impact sound insulation was evaluated from 20 or 25 Hz using a flat frequency-weighting factor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-67509 (URN)10.1016/j.apacoust.2018.01.019 (DOI)000428484500001 ()2-s2.0-85041462199 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-02-05 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-02-05 Created: 2018-02-05 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved
Lundkvist, A., Johnsson, R., Nykänen, A. & Stridfelt, J. (2017). 3D Auditory Displays for Parking Assistance Systems. SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Electronic and Electrical Systems, 10(1), 17-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>3D Auditory Displays for Parking Assistance Systems
2017 (English)In: SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Electronic and Electrical Systems, ISSN 1946-4614, E-ISSN 1946-4622, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 17-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to investigate if 3D auditory displays could be used to enhance parking assistance systems (PAS). Objective measurements and estimations of workload were used to assess the benefits of different 3D auditory displays. In today’s cars, PAS normally use a visual display together with simple sound signals to inform drivers of obstacles in close proximity. These systems rely heavily on the visual display, as the sound does not provide information about obstacles' location. This may cause the driver to lose focus on the surroundings and reduce situational awareness. Two user studies (during summer and winter) were conducted to compare three different systems. The baseline system corresponded to a system normally found in today’s cars. The other systems were designed with a 3D auditory display, conveying information of where obstacles were located through sound. A visual display was also available. Both normal parking and parallel parking was conducted. Time taken for parking and the number of obstacles/curb hits were recorded. Participants answered a NASA TLX questionnaire after evaluating each PAS for estimation of their experienced workload. Most participants enjoyed the additional information provided by the 3D auditory displays. The winter trial showed a significant reduction in perceived effort when using a 3D auditory display compared to the baseline. The summer trial showed tendencies of higher mental demand and frustration with the baseline compared to the 3D auditory displays. The results suggest that 3D auditory displays can be appreciated and useful in difficult parking situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society of Automotive Engineers, 2017
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62804 (URN)10.4271/2017-01-9627 (DOI)000408315300003 ()2-s2.0-85018329108 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-04-26 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2017-03-30 Created: 2017-03-30 Last updated: 2018-11-19Bibliographically approved
Asplund, M., Rantatalo, M., Johnsson, R. & Hiensch, M. (2016). Combating curve squeal noise (ed.). In: (Ed.), Combating curve squeal noise: . Paper presented at World Congress of Railway Research : 29/05/2016 - 02/06/2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combating curve squeal noise
2016 (English)In: Combating curve squeal noise, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Society demand for more sustainable transports is increasing, starting a modal shift from road to railway. The resulting increase in railway traffic intensity is leading to more activities on the track, even during the night time. For many years continuous urbanization has been resulting in a higher density of residents in areas close to railway tracks. The combination of these factors is raising the issue of noise disturbances from railway transports, which is forcing infrastructure managers to take action to combat noise from railway traffic systematically. There are different types of noise emanating from railways and one of the most annoying is curve squeal noise. This paper deals with the curve squeal phenomenon, the places where it occurs, and different methods for reducing it. The curving behaviour of a vehicle plays an important role in the generation of curve squeals, and therefore the way in which different rail profiles affect the capability to steer in a sharp curve is dealt within this paper. The paper is based on two case studies with investigated curves in urban regions that suffer from squeal noise, and in which comparisons between measurements and simulations were performed. The outcome of these studies is a workflow for combating squeal noise, results concerning the effects of a top-of-rail friction modifier on noise mitigation, and a proposed rail profiles for improving the steering capability of vehicles.

National Category
Other Civil Engineering Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Operation and Maintenance; Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-30197 (URN)3f064eb1-850b-4505-bc0c-a88eca0a1554 (Local ID)3f064eb1-850b-4505-bc0c-a88eca0a1554 (Archive number)3f064eb1-850b-4505-bc0c-a88eca0a1554 (OAI)
Conference
World Congress of Railway Research : 29/05/2016 - 02/06/2016
Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Lundkvist, A., Nykänen, A. & Johnsson, R. (2016). Signal Sound Positioning Alters Driving Performance (ed.). SAE International Journal of Transportation Safety, 4(1), 1-7, Article ID 2015-01-9152.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Signal Sound Positioning Alters Driving Performance
2016 (English)In: SAE International Journal of Transportation Safety, ISSN 2327-5626, E-ISSN 2327-5634, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-7, article id 2015-01-9152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many of the information systems in cars require visual attention, and a way to reduce both visual and cognitive workload could be to use sound. An experiment was designed in order to determine how driving and secondary task performance is affected by the use of information sound signals and their spatial positions. The experiment was performed in a driving simulator utilizing Lane Change Task as a driving scenario in combination with the Surrogate Reference Task as a secondary task. Two different signal sounds with different spatial positions informed the driver when a lane change should be made and when a new secondary task was presented. Driving performance was significantly improved when both signal sounds were presented in front of the driver. No significant effects on secondary task performance were found. It is recommended that signal sounds are placed in front of the driver, when possible, if the goal is to draw attention forward.

National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11167 (URN)10.4271/2015-01-9152 (DOI)000449969600001 ()2-s2.0-84979222173 (Scopus ID)a13006eb-4097-472e-a1bb-37d8dc6f4b09 (Local ID)a13006eb-4097-472e-a1bb-37d8dc6f4b09 (Archive number)a13006eb-4097-472e-a1bb-37d8dc6f4b09 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 1; 20151127 (lunand)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Mishra, M., Odelius, J., Rantatalo, M., Johnsson, R., Larsson, J.-O., Bellander, M. & Niemi, I. (2016). Simulations and measurements of the dynamic response of a paper machine roller (ed.). Insight (Northampton), 58(4), 210-212
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulations and measurements of the dynamic response of a paper machine roller
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2016 (English)In: Insight (Northampton), ISSN 1354-2575, E-ISSN 1754-4904, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 210-212Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper industry is a highly automated industry that includes many different production steps, in which a variety of machine components are used. In a paper machine, where the pulp is being transformed into paper, rotating components such as bearing-mounted rollers play an important part in driving the wire with the pulp through the process. In this type of industry with a serial layout, the failure of a single roller or bearing could lead to the stoppage of several production steps, with costly consequences as a result. To ensure and optimise asset availability, a condition-based maintenance (CBM) strategy could be implemented. However, CBM is dependent on an appropriate condition monitoring (CM) technique to detect a physical phenomenon that defines the state of critical components or systems. For the development of CM techniques, it is therefore important to understand and model the physical behaviour of the system in question. In this paper, the behaviour of a roller in a paper machine is analysed using the finite element method (FEM). The physical model was compared with vibration measurements collected from an online monitoring system and an experimental modal analysis.

National Category
Other Civil Engineering Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Operation and Maintenance; Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12822 (URN)10.1784/insi.2016.58.4.210 (DOI)000373565000008 ()2-s2.0-84963831882 (Scopus ID)bf9500b5-5abe-4388-b1d1-9ec8202757ed (Local ID)bf9500b5-5abe-4388-b1d1-9ec8202757ed (Archive number)bf9500b5-5abe-4388-b1d1-9ec8202757ed (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20160414 (madmis)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Löfdahl, M., Johnsson, R. & Nykänen, A. (2015). An auralization model for structure-borne tire noise (ed.). Paper presented at . Applied Acoustics, 96, 61-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An auralization model for structure-borne tire noise
2015 (English)In: Applied Acoustics, ISSN 0003-682X, E-ISSN 1872-910X, Vol. 96, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the automotive industry, a Noise, Vibration, and Harshness (NVH) issue such as road noise is an important factor for the perceived quality of a product. A useful method to address NVH problems and to reduce field-testing is to combine recordings and simulations into auralizations. The objective of this paper was to develop an auralization model of structure-borne tire noise based on operationally measured hub forces and validate it by comparison with artificial head recordings made under the same conditions. To create auralizations under the same condition as the recordings, the wheel hub forces used for the recordings were measured and filtered through experimentally measured binaural transfer functions from the same hub of the car to an artificial head in the cabin of the car. The auralization model was validated in a listening test where the criterion for considering the auralizations to be sufficiently similar to the recordings was that eight different tires should be ranked equally in a listening test regardless of whether the test was based on auralizations or recordings. Listening test results from ranking of tires with respect to the annoyance of interior sounds showed good agreement between auralizations and recordings. There were no significant differences between rankings based on recordings and auralizations – except for tires assessed to be very similar – at either 50 km/h or 70 km/h. The conclusion was that the use of auralizations for ranking of structure-borne tire noise gives results that match listening tests based on recordings, and this supports the validity of the auralization model.

National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4848 (URN)10.1016/j.apacoust.2015.03.011 (DOI)000355033900007 ()2-s2.0-84961324652 (Scopus ID)2d846029-5e21-4b30-91f4-21ffa1ad3019 (Local ID)2d846029-5e21-4b30-91f4-21ffa1ad3019 (Archive number)2d846029-5e21-4b30-91f4-21ffa1ad3019 (OAI)
Projects
CASTT - Centre for Automotive Systems Technologies and Testing
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20150402 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Nykänen, A., Lennström, D. & Johnsson, R. (2015). Car Ride Before Entering the Lab Increases Precision in Listening Tests (ed.). Paper presented at . SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Mechanical Systems, 8(3), 982-988
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Car Ride Before Entering the Lab Increases Precision in Listening Tests
2015 (English)In: SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Mechanical Systems, ISSN 1946-3995, E-ISSN 1946-4002, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 982-988Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Subjects who are well aware of what to judge commonly yield more consistent results in laboratory listening tests. This awareness may be raised by explicit instructions and training. However, too explicit instructions or use of only trained subjects may direct experiment results in an undesired way. An alternative is to give fairly open instructions to untrained subjects, but give the subjects a chance to get familiar with the product and context by, for example, riding a representative car under representative driving conditions before entering the laboratory. In this study, sound quality assessments of interior sounds of cars made by two groups were compared. In one group subjects were exposed to the same driving conditions that were later assessed in a laboratory listening test by taking them on a ride in one of the cars to be assessed, just before entering the laboratory. In the other group subjects made the laboratory assessments without prior car riding. In the laboratory, sound quality was assessed for binaurally recorded interior sounds of cars reproduced through headphones. The results showed that even though average sound quality assessments in most cases were the same for both groups, the variances were significantly smaller for the group where subjects had been taken on the car ride before the listening test. A conclusion is that being exposed to the sounds in the right context just before the listening test, e.g. by riding a representative car under representative driving conditions, can increase the precision in laboratory sound quality assessments.

National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8737 (URN)10.4271/2015-01-2285 (DOI)000421799000023 ()2-s2.0-84955103366 (Scopus ID)7445e128-85e2-41b2-8db9-31b485056ff9 (Local ID)7445e128-85e2-41b2-8db9-31b485056ff9 (Archive number)7445e128-85e2-41b2-8db9-31b485056ff9 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 1; 20151013 (davlen)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2237-878x

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