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Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Kumpiene, J., Antelo, J., Brännvall, E., Carabante, I., Ek, K., Komárek, M., . . . Wårell, L. (2019). In situ chemical stabilization of trace element-contaminated soil: Field demonstrations and barriers to transition from laboratory to the field : A review. Applied Geochemistry, 100, 335-351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In situ chemical stabilization of trace element-contaminated soil: Field demonstrations and barriers to transition from laboratory to the field : A review
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2019 (English)In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 100, p. 335-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The chemical stabilization, or immobilization, of trace elements (metals and metalloids; TE) in contaminated soil has been studied for decades. A vast number of scientific publications are available on the method performance in laboratory settings, reporting that the application of various soil amendments to contaminated soil reduces TE mobility, bioavailability and toxicity. The most commonly used soil amendments include organic matter, iron oxides, phosphates, ashes, and lately biochar, alone or in combination with each other and/or lime. Most of the implemented field studies show a certain degree of improvement in soil and/or vegetation status following amendment. Regardless the positive performance of the technique in the laboratory, field validations and demonstrations remain scarce. The establishment of a field experiment often involves permits from authorities and agreements with site owners, both of which are considerably more time-consuming than laboratory tests. Due to conservative institutional structures, public authorities have been slow to adopt alternative remediation technologies, especially when the total TE concentration in soil remains the same and all of the associated risks are not yet convincingly described. For this reason, researchers should also focus on enhancing public knowledge of alternative remediation techniques so that future projects which aim to demonstrate the effectiveness of in situ immobilization techniques under natural conditions will be supported.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Soil remediation, Immobilization, Soil amendments, Leaching, Bioavailability
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering Economics
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology; Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72432 (URN)10.1016/j.apgeochem.2018.12.003 (DOI)000454459100032 ()2-s2.0-85058489499 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-01-04 (svasva)

Available from: 2019-01-03 Created: 2019-01-03 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Brännvall, E. & Kumpiene, J. (2016). Fly ash in landfill top covers: a review (ed.). Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, 18(1), 11-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fly ash in landfill top covers: a review
2016 (English)In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increase of energy recovery from municipal solid waste by incineration results in the increased amounts of incineration residues, such as fly ash, that have to be taken care of. Material properties should define whether fly ash is a waste or a viable resource to be used for various applications. Here, two areas of potential fly ash application are reviewed: the use of fly ash in a landfill top cover either as a liner material or as a soil amendment in vegetation layer. Fly ashes from incineration of three types of fuel are considered: refuse derived fuel (RDF), municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and biofuel. Based on the observations, RDF and MSWI fly ash is considered as suitable materials to be used in a landfill top cover liner. Whereas MSWI and biofuel fly ashes based on element availability for plant studies, could be considered suitable for the vegetation layer of the top cover. Responsible application of MSWI ashes is, however, warranted in order to avoid element accumulation in soil and elevation of background values over time.

National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11034 (URN)10.1039/c5em00419e (DOI)000368858400002 ()26701627 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84955509711 (Scopus ID)9efe6b63-b7a3-4c19-80bd-a922585f33d9 (Local ID)9efe6b63-b7a3-4c19-80bd-a922585f33d9 (Archive number)9efe6b63-b7a3-4c19-80bd-a922585f33d9 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20151228 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Kumpiene, J., Brännvall, E., Wolters, M., Skoglund, N., Cirba, S. & Aksamitauskas, V. C. (2016). Phosphorus and cadmium availability in soil fertilized with biosolids and ashes (ed.). Chemosphere, 151, 124-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phosphorus and cadmium availability in soil fertilized with biosolids and ashes
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2016 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 151, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The recycling of hygienized municipal sewage sludge (biosolids) to soil as the source of phosphorus (P) is generally encouraged. The use of biosolids, however, has some concerns, such as the presence of elevated concentrations of potentially toxic trace elements, and the possible presence of pathogens, hormones and antibiotics. Organic substances are destroyed during combustion whereas trace elements could partly be separated from P in different ash fractions. Biomass combustion waste (ash) can instead be considered as an alternative P source. This study evaluates and compares the impact of biosolids and their combustion residues (ashes), when used as fertilizers, on P and Cd solubility in soil, plant growth and plant uptake of these elements. Biosolids were also amended with K and Ca to improve the composition and properties of P in ashes, and incinerated at either 800 °C or 950 °C. Combustion of biosolids improved the Cd/P ratio in ashes by 2-5 times, compared with the initial biosolids. The low Cd content in ashes (4-9 mg Cd (kg P)-1) makes this material a particularly attractive alternative to mineral fertilizers. Significantly higher pore water P (as well as total N) was measured in soils containing biosolids, but plants produced a higher biomass in soil fertilized with ashes. The K and Ca amendments prior to biosolids combustion generally decreased the total Cd in ash, but had little effect on P and Cd uptake and biomass growth. Similarly, the combustion temperature had negligible effect on these factors as well

National Category
Other Environmental Engineering Energy Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology; Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9570 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.02.069 (DOI)000374071000016 ()26933903 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84959221559 (Scopus ID)8383e6a4-cd0f-4090-bd47-01caffdd123e (Local ID)8383e6a4-cd0f-4090-bd47-01caffdd123e (Archive number)8383e6a4-cd0f-4090-bd47-01caffdd123e (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20160307 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Brännvall, E., Andreas, L., Sjöblom, R. & Lagerkvist, A. (2015). Changes of fly ash properties during the ageing (ed.). Paper presented at . Journal of environmental engineering, 141(5), Article ID 4014083.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes of fly ash properties during the ageing
2015 (English)In: Journal of environmental engineering, ISSN 0733-9372, E-ISSN 1943-7870, Vol. 141, no 5, article id 4014083Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aging of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) fly ashes was investigated in a long-term laboratory experiment. Aging affected the chemical stability of RDF fly ash in terms of leaching behavior, ANC, and mineralogical transformations. The design of experiment model evaluation showed that the use of RDF ashes in a top cover liner construction has the following advantages: most of the investigated hazardous elements like Pb, Cl, Cr, Cu, etc., will not be released from the ashes, and their buffer capacity will increase with time. However, aging has the disadvantage that leaching of Zn and SO 4 is likely to increase. The multivariate data analysis of the coefficients of variation did not reveal any systematic errors in the performance of the experiment. However, batch leaching test not always reflect the real situation in the landfill top cover environment.

National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8256 (URN)10.1061/(ASCE)EE.1943-7870.0000910 (DOI)000353994400004 ()2-s2.0-84928011872 (Scopus ID)6bc7765e-e807-45da-9caf-9969de602d29 (Local ID)6bc7765e-e807-45da-9caf-9969de602d29 (Archive number)6bc7765e-e807-45da-9caf-9969de602d29 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20130923 (evebra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Brännvall, E., Wolters, M., Sjöblom, R. & Kumpiene, J. (2015). Elements availability in soil fertilized with pelletized fly ash and biosolids (ed.). Journal of Environmental Management, 159, 27-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elements availability in soil fertilized with pelletized fly ash and biosolids
2015 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 159, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of combined and pelletized industrial residues on availability and mobility of nutrients and potentially toxic elements in soil, plant growth and element uptake. Plant pot experiments were carried out using soil to which 2% of pelletized residue containing biosolids mixed with either municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MFA) or biofuel fly ash (BFA) was added. The tests showed that the plant growth did not correspond to the content of available nutrients in fertilised soil. MFA application to soil resulted in elevated concentrations of P (506 mg/kg), As (2.7 mg/kg), Cd (0.8 mg/kg) and Pb (12.1 mg/kg) in soil, lower plant uptake of Al (25 mg/kg) and Ba (51 mg/kg), but higher accumulation of As (4.3 mg/kg) and Cd (0.3 mg/kg) in plants compared to the unamended soil and soil amended with BFA. On average, the biomass of the plants grown in the soil containing MFA was larger than in other soils.Considering the use of industrial residue mixtures as soil amendments or fertilizers, the amount of added elements should not exceed those taken up by plants, by this preventing the increase of soil background concentrations.

National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10865 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvman.2015.05.032 (DOI)000357908000004 ()26042629 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84930205392 (Scopus ID)9bd3e8bf-6ee6-4699-a07d-5e6f8104c789 (Local ID)9bd3e8bf-6ee6-4699-a07d-5e6f8104c789 (Archive number)9bd3e8bf-6ee6-4699-a07d-5e6f8104c789 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20140213 (evebra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Brännvall, E., Zamora, C. B., Sjöblom, R. & Kumpiene, J. (2014). Effect of industrial residue combinations on availability of elements (ed.). Paper presented at . Journal of Hazardous Materials, 276, 171-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of industrial residue combinations on availability of elements
2014 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 276, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Industrial residues, such as fly ashes and biosolids, contain elements (e.g. N, P, K, S, Ca and Zn) that make them a viable alternative for synthetic fertilizers in forestry and agriculture. However, the use of these materials is often limited due to the presence of potentially toxic substances. It is therefore necessary to assess and, when warranted, modify the chemical and physical form of these and similar waste materials before any advantages are taken of their beneficial properties. Biofuel fly ash, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash, biosolids, peat, peat residues and gypsum board waste were combined in various proportions, and this resulted in increased leaching of N, P, S, Cu and Mn, but decreased leaching of Ca, K, Mg, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Al, As and Pb. Chemical fractionation revealed that elements Ca, K, Mg, S and Mn were predominantly exchangeable, while the rest of the elements were less mobile. Cadmium was mostly exchangeable in MSWI fly ash, but less mobile in biofuel fly ash mixtures. Recycling of MSWI fly ash in the mixtures with fertilizers is considerably less attractive, due to the high levels of salts and exchangeable Cd.

National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-15229 (URN)10.1016/j.jhazmat.2014.05.026 (DOI)000339692700021 ()24887119 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84901487848 (Scopus ID)eba22426-9918-400e-a3f9-751cdbaab21f (Local ID)eba22426-9918-400e-a3f9-751cdbaab21f (Archive number)eba22426-9918-400e-a3f9-751cdbaab21f (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20130923 (evebra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Brännvall, E., Nilsson, M., Sjöblom, R., Skoglund, N. & Kumpiene, J. (2014). Effect of residue combinations on plant uptake of nutrients and potentially toxic elements (ed.). Journal of Environmental Management, 132, 287-295
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of residue combinations on plant uptake of nutrients and potentially toxic elements
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 132, p. 287-295Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the plant pot experiment was to evaluate potential environmental impacts of combined industrial residues to be used as soil fertilisers by analysing i) element availability in fly ash and biosolids mixed with soil both individual and in combination, ii) changes in element phytoavailability in soil fertilised with these materials and iii) impact of the fertilisers on plant growth and element uptake.Plant pot experiments were carried out, using soil to which fresh residue mixtures had been added. The results showed that element availability did not correlate with plant growth in the fertilised soil with. The largest concentrations of K (3534mg/l), Mg (184mg/l), P (1.8mg/l), S (760mg/l), Cu (0.39mg/l) and Zn (0.58mg/l) in soil pore water were found in the soil mixture with biosolids and MSWI fly ashes; however plants did not grow at all in mixtures containing the latter, most likely due to the high concentration of chlorides (82g/kg in the leachate) in this ash. It is known that high salinity of soil can reduce germination by e.g. limiting water absorption by the seeds. The concentrations of As, Cd and Pb in grown plants were negligible in most of the soils and were below the instrument detection limit values.The proportions of biofuel fly ash and biosolids can be adjusted in order to balance the amount and availability of macronutrients, while the possible increase of potentially toxic elements in biomass is negligible seeing as the plant uptake of such elements was low. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords
Phytoavailability, Residues, Sequential extraction, Soil pore water
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12630 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvman.2013.11.024 (DOI)000331671800032 ()24321288 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84890090631 (Scopus ID)bcb208c4-551b-4913-b42a-74b5680bb794 (Local ID)bcb208c4-551b-4913-b42a-74b5680bb794 (Archive number)bcb208c4-551b-4913-b42a-74b5680bb794 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2014; 20131210 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Brännvall, E., Andreas, L., Sjöblom, R., Diener, S. & Lagerkvist, A. (2014). Factors influencing chemical and mineralogical changes in RDF fly ashes during aging (ed.). Journal of environmental engineering, 140(3), Article ID 4013014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influencing chemical and mineralogical changes in RDF fly ashes during aging
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2014 (English)In: Journal of environmental engineering, ISSN 0733-9372, E-ISSN 1943-7870, Vol. 140, no 3, article id 4013014Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effects of aging should be considered for reliable long-term assessments of the environmental risks of the use of refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) fly ash as landfill top cover liner material. Mineral transformations that occur in RDF fly ash, and the effects of selected factors on these transformations, were studied on compacted fly ash specimens in an accelerated aging experiment using a reduced factorial design. Carbon dioxide concentration, temperature, relative air humidity, time, and the quality of added water were varied in six factor combinations. Acid neutralization capacity and leaching behavior were analyzed after four different periods of time. The results were evaluated with multivariate data analysis. A significant change in the acid neutralization capacity, a decrease in leaching of Ba, Ca, Cl − , Cr, Cu, Pb, K, and Na, and an increase in solubility of Mg, Si, Zn, and SO 2− 4 could be attributed to different aging conditions

National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9814 (URN)10.1061/(ASCE)EE.1943-7870.0000802 (DOI)000332659800009 ()2-s2.0-84894352857 (Scopus ID)87fa6fee-92b6-4121-bb20-1f4cc6fca0fa (Local ID)87fa6fee-92b6-4121-bb20-1f4cc6fca0fa (Archive number)87fa6fee-92b6-4121-bb20-1f4cc6fca0fa (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2014; 20130923 (evebra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Kumpiene, J., Brännvall, E., Lagerkvist, A. & Andreas, L. (2014). Project: North Waste Infrastructure. Paper presented at .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Project: North Waste Infrastructure
2014 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-36255 (URN)cb5482bb-8966-4045-9e02-13f77f7320fa (Local ID)cb5482bb-8966-4045-9e02-13f77f7320fa (Archive number)cb5482bb-8966-4045-9e02-13f77f7320fa (OAI)
Note

Status: Avslutat; Period: 03/01/2011 → …; Faktiskt slutdatum: 22/05/2014

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-05-15Bibliographically approved
Brännvall, E. & Kumpiene, J. (2013). Changes in Element Solubility in Fly Ash and Biosolid Mixtures Used for Soil Fertilization (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), 12th International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements, Athens, Georgia, USA, June 16-20, 2013: . Paper presented at International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements : 16/06/2013 - 20/06/2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in Element Solubility in Fly Ash and Biosolid Mixtures Used for Soil Fertilization
2013 (English)In: 12th International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements, Athens, Georgia, USA, June 16-20, 2013, 2013Conference paper, Meeting abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-35303 (URN)9c7ce3ac-78a7-4b5a-9c20-a44b3c0d9a6d (Local ID)9c7ce3ac-78a7-4b5a-9c20-a44b3c0d9a6d (Archive number)9c7ce3ac-78a7-4b5a-9c20-a44b3c0d9a6d (OAI)
Conference
International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements : 16/06/2013 - 20/06/2013
Note
Godkänd; 2013; 20130327 (evebra)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8843-043x

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