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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Linde, S. (2018). Political communication and public support for climate mitigation policies: a country-comparative perspective. Climate Policy, 18(5), 543-555
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Political communication and public support for climate mitigation policies: a country-comparative perspective
2018 (English)In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 543-555Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding under what conditions individuals are willing to support policies aimed at mitigating climate change has important consequences for the legitimacy, costs, effectiveness, and longevity of any policy alternative. Given the politicized nature of climate change, one factor that has been found to be important in explaining public support is partisan political communication. It has, for example, been shown how political communication has important effects on public beliefs and attitudes regarding climate change. A lack of country comparative studies, together with methodological limitations in previous research, has, however, led to a limited understanding of how these processes work, especially in a comparative perspective. In this paper, the effects of political communication on public support for climate mitigation, and the cross-country variations of these effects, is studied. Specifically, this paper investigates: (1) to what degree individual policy attitudes varies across party lines, (2) to what degree variations in policy attitudes can be explained by the effect of party cues, and (3) to what extent the effect of partisanship and political communication varies across political contexts. Using original data from a country comparative online public opinion survey covering Australia, New Zealand, Norway and Sweden political communication is found to significantly influence public policy attitudes in all contexts studied, albeit to different degrees.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Political Science Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63989 (URN)10.1080/14693062.2017.1327840 (DOI)000428156600001 ()2-s2.0-85020465013 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-03-20 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2017-06-14 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2018-12-04Bibliographically approved
Jagers, S., Linde, S., Martinsson, J. & Matti, S. (2017). Testing the Importance of Individuals’ Motives for Explaining Environmentally Significant Behavior (ed.). Social Science Quarterly, 98(2), 644-658
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing the Importance of Individuals’ Motives for Explaining Environmentally Significant Behavior
2017 (English)In: Social Science Quarterly, ISSN 0038-4941, E-ISSN 1540-6237, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 644-658Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectiveThis article explores how different motives affect behavior, and attempts to explain how the causal chain of values and beliefs forms our understanding of and motives for private-sphere environmentally significant behaviors (ESBs). As a point of departure, we postulate that traditional models focusing primarily on individual-level motivation as a driver for ESB should benefit significantly from making a distinction in the dependent variable between: (1) behaviors that are explicitly pro-environmental, judging both by their outcomes and the individual's stated motives for undertaking them; (2) behaviors that have a positive environmental impact but that are connected to motives other than environmental ones; as well as (3) behaviors where both environmental and other motives coincide as drivers for ESB.MethodsIn order to answer our research questions, we use survey data collected from a random sample from the Swedish population register. The main dependent variable is the self-reported frequency of 12 different kinds of nonactivist, private-sphere behaviors. We employ ordinary least square regressions to analyze the explanatory strength of individual-level motivational factors for ESB when taking stated motives for behavior into account.Results and ConclusionThe results support our main assumption that to explain drivers for ESB, stated motives should be taken into account. For all of the 12 ESBs in the survey, a considerable share of the respondents do not perceive or motivate behavior as pro-environmentalism at all, and others provide multiple motives for their behavior, combining, for example, economic or health with environmentalism. Furthermore, when analyzing the relationship between a scientifically well-established model aspiring to explain pro-environmental behavior, and individuals’ behavioral perceptions and their stated behavior, we find that the explanatory power of this model is clearly sensitive to people's stated motives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7611 (URN)10.1111/ssqu.12321 (DOI)000405329500018 ()2-s2.0-84994157706 (Scopus ID)600a8d9c-8e68-45a3-8542-83a2b21ff8bf (Local ID)600a8d9c-8e68-45a3-8542-83a2b21ff8bf (Archive number)600a8d9c-8e68-45a3-8542-83a2b21ff8bf (OAI)
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-06-19 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Poulton, M. M., Jagers, S., Linde, S., Zyl, D. V., Danielson, L. J. & Matti, S. (2013). State of the world’s nonfuel mineral resources: supply, demand, and socio-institutional fundamentals (ed.). Paper presented at . Annual Review Environment and Resources, 38, 345-371
Open this publication in new window or tab >>State of the world’s nonfuel mineral resources: supply, demand, and socio-institutional fundamentals
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2013 (English)In: Annual Review Environment and Resources, ISSN 1543-5938, E-ISSN 1545-2050, Vol. 38, p. 345-371Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current material supply-demand imbalances are driven by situational- rather than physical scarcities, resulting in a growing interest among government, civil society, and industry to consider not only the availability of mineral resources, but also the sustainability implications of its production. This, in turn, places increasing pressure on mining companies to broaden its concerns when planning new mining projects, covering its “social license to operate” by incorporating strategies for limiting negative socio-environmental impacts alongside calculations of the project’s economic viability as well as balancing a large number of potential stakeholders and interests. Accordingly, understanding also the socio-political context of mineral development is crucial for development of sustainable practices within the mining industry. By applying a sustainable development-framework this article outlines the complex web of challenges associated with sustainable mineral extraction, ranging from technological and economic development to political and institutional concerns on how to govern and manage scarce resources in a globalized world.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10288 (URN)10.1146/annurev-environ-022310-094734 (DOI)000326691100015 ()2-s2.0-84887478919 (Scopus ID)915017d9-c3f9-494d-92c9-68ec50ed2a93 (Local ID)915017d9-c3f9-494d-92c9-68ec50ed2a93 (Archive number)915017d9-c3f9-494d-92c9-68ec50ed2a93 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20130614 (simonm)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Linde, S., Matti, S. & Jagers, S. (2012). Political and institutional prerequisites for successful mining establishment and development: a synthesis of social science research (ed.). Paper presented at . Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Political and institutional prerequisites for successful mining establishment and development: a synthesis of social science research
2012 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Mining has a substantial influence on several parts of society, in part by providing economic and social development, but also through negative environmental and social-cultural impacts connected to its operation. This combination of both positive and negative effects induces a complex planning and permitting process concerning large and differentiated values, long time spans and large numbers of actors. The aim of this report is to conduct a survey of previous research on societal aspects on mines and mining conducted within political science in particular (and within a broader spectrum of other social sciences in general). The emphasis of the study is placed on identifying research focusing on how, and to what extent, political and institutional factors affect processes of mining development and subsequent serve to shape their outcomes. Results show that previous research has focused on the distribution of rights and resources in connection to development. Five main sub-categories are identified: national mining policies, indigenous rights, corporate social responsibility, company-community conflicts and environmental impacts. Research on how the development processes is impacted by the influence of e.g. public opinion and stakeholder core values, of interactions within the administrative system and of national and subnational policies has though largely been overlooked.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2012. p. 53
Series
Research report / Luleå University of Technology, ISSN 1402-1528
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-22286 (URN)241af11c-2f87-4160-9b68-172f1120cba6 (Local ID)978-91-7439-411-5 (ISBN)241af11c-2f87-4160-9b68-172f1120cba6 (Archive number)241af11c-2f87-4160-9b68-172f1120cba6 (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2012; 20120227 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5308-1049

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