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Engström, Emma
Publications (10 of 55) Show all publications
Augustsson, A., Lundgren, M., Qvarforth, A., Hough, R., Engström, E., Paulukat, C. & Rodushkin, I. (2023). Managing health risks in urban agriculture: The effect of vegetable washing for reducing exposure to metal contaminants. Science of the Total Environment, 863, Article ID 160996.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing health risks in urban agriculture: The effect of vegetable washing for reducing exposure to metal contaminants
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2023 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 863, article id 160996Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A common, yet poorly evaluated, advice to remove contaminants from urban vegetables is to wash the produce before consumption. This study is based on 63 samples of chard, kale, lettuce and parsley that have grown near a heavily trafficked road in the third largest city in Sweden, with one portion of each sample being analysed without first being washed, and the other portion being subjected to common household washing. Concentrations of 71 elements were analysed by ICP-SFMS after a sample digestion that dissolves both the plant tissues and all potentially adhering particles. The results show that the washing effect, or the fraction removed upon washing, varies significantly between elements: from approximately 0 % for K to 68 % for the ∑REEs. Considering traditional metal contaminants, the efficiency decreased from Pb (on average 56 % lost) to Co (56 %) > Cr (55 %) > As (45 %) > Sb (35 %) > Ni (33 %) > Cu (13 %) > Zn (7 %) > Cd (7 %), and Ba (5 %). A clear negative correlation between the washing effect and the different elements' bioconcentration factors shows that the elements' accessibility for plant uptake is a key controlling factor for the degree to which they are removed upon washing. Based on the average washing efficiencies seen in this study, the average daily intake of Pb would increase by 130 % if vegetables are not washed prior to consumption. For the other contaminant metals this increase corresponds to 126 % (Co), 121 % (Cr), 82 % (As), 55 % (Sb), 50 % (Ni), 16 % (Cu), 8 % (Zn), 7 % (Cd) and 5 % (Ba). The advice to wash vegetables is therefore, for many elements, highly motivated for reducing exposure and health risks. For elements which are only slightly reduced when the vegetables are washed, however, advising should rather focus on reducing levels of contamination in the soil itself.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2023
Keywords
Risk assessment, Soil contamination, Soil particle adherence, Soil-plant transfer, Urban gardening, Vegetable washing
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-95137 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2022.160996 (DOI)000908653400001 ()36539086 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144354171 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Linnaeus University
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-01-04 (joosat);

Funder: ALS Scandinavia AB;

Licens fulltext: CC BY License

Available from: 2023-01-04 Created: 2023-01-04 Last updated: 2023-01-23Bibliographically approved
Augustsson, A., Lundgren, M., Qvarforth, A., Engström, E., Paulukat, C., Rodushkin, I., . . . Hough, R. L. (2023). Urban vegetable contamination - The role of adhering particles and their significance for human exposure. Science of the Total Environment, 900, Article ID 165633.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban vegetable contamination - The role of adhering particles and their significance for human exposure
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2023 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 900, article id 165633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While urban-grown vegetables could help combat future food insecurity, the elevated levels of toxic metals in urban soils need to be met with measures that minimise transfer to crops. The study firstly examines soil/dust particle inclusion in leafy vegetables and its contribution to vegetable metals (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn), using vegetable, soil and dust data from an open-field urban farm in southeastern Sweden. Titanium concentrations were used to assess soil/dust adherence. Results showed that vegetables contained 0.05–1.3 wt% of adhering particles (AP) even after washing. With 0.5 % AP, an adult with an average intake of vegetables could ingest approximately 100mg of particles per day, highlighting leafy vegetables as a major route for soil/dust ingestion. The presence of adhering particles also significantly contributed to the vegetable concentrations of As (9-20%), Co (17-20%), Pb (25-29%), and Cr (33-34%). Secondly, data from an indoor experiment was used to characterise root metal uptake from 20 urban soils from Sweden, Denmark, Spain, the UK, and the Czech Republic. Combining particle adherence and root uptake data, vegetable metal concentrations were calculated for the 20 urban soils to represent hypothetical field scenarios for these. Subsequently, average daily doses were assessed for vegetable consumers (adults and 3-6 year old children), distinguishing between doses from adhering particles and root uptake. Risks were evaluated from hazard quotients (HQs; average daily doses/tolerable intakes). Lead was found to pose the greatest risk, where particle ingestion often resulted in HQs>1 across all assessed scenarios. In summary, since washing was shown to remove only a portion of adhering metal-laden soil/dust particles from leafy vegetation, farmers and urban planners need to consider that measures to limit particle deposition are equally important as cultivating in uncontaminated soil.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Arsenic, Cadmium, Foliar contamination, Lead, Particulate matter, Risk assessment, Urban farming, Urban produce safety, Urban soil
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-99719 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.165633 (DOI)001065300000001 ()37474053 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85167818632 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-11-13 (hanlid);

Funder: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences at the Linnaeus University; ALS Scandinavia AB;

Full text license: CC BY

Available from: 2023-08-15 Created: 2023-08-15 Last updated: 2023-11-13Bibliographically approved
Rodushkin, I., Engström, E., Pontér, S. & Pennisi, M. (2022). Elemental stable isotope assessment of groundwater contamination: recent developments. Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health, 26, Article ID 100330.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elemental stable isotope assessment of groundwater contamination: recent developments
2022 (English)In: Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health, ISSN 2468-5844, Vol. 26, article id 100330Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anthropogenic contamination of water resources remains a severe environmental concern on a global scale. Radiogenic and stable isotope measurements (especially for light elements) constitute well-known tools for the identification of pollution sources and thus have considerable potential in prevention and remediation efforts. Recent instrumental and methodological advances have extended the isotope ‘toolbox’ to include a significant number of new stable isotope systems, which in turn resulted in rapid growth of studies using these novel tracers in the field of environmental forensics. Isotopic fractionation, occurring during post-release transformation of contaminants, offers an additional benefit of possibility to study the fate of pollutants in aquatic systems. This review will focus on selected relevant studies in the field and present future trends and development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Environmental forensic, Groundwater contamination, Post-release fractionation, Source identification, Stable isotopes
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-89163 (URN)10.1016/j.coesh.2022.100330 (DOI)000766839100008 ()2-s2.0-85124729276 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-04-19 (hanlid);

Part of special issue: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 2022: Management of Groundwater resources and pollution prevention

Available from: 2022-02-10 Created: 2022-02-10 Last updated: 2022-07-05Bibliographically approved
Qvarforth, A., Lundgren, M., Rodushkin, I., Engström, E., Paulukat, C., Hough, R. L., . . . Augustsson, A. (2022). Future food contaminants: An assessment of the plant uptake of Technology-critical elements versus traditional metal contaminants. Environment International, 169, Article ID 107504.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future food contaminants: An assessment of the plant uptake of Technology-critical elements versus traditional metal contaminants
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2022 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 169, article id 107504Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Technology-critical elements (TCEs) include most rare earth elements (REEs), the platinum group elements (PGEs), and Ga, Ge, In, Nb, Ta, Te, and Tl. Despite increasing recognition of their prolific release into the environment, their soil to plant transfer remains largely unknown. This paper provides an approximation of the potential for plant uptake by calculating bioconcentration factors (BCFs), defined as the concentration in edible vegetable tissues relative to that in cultivation soil. Here data were obtained from an indoor cultivation experiment growing lettuce, chard, and carrot on 22 different European urban soils. Values of BCFs were determined from concentrations of TCEs in vegetable samples after digestion with concentrated HNO3, and from concentrations in soil determined after 1) Aqua Regia digestion and, 2) diluted (0.1 M) HNO3 leaching. For comparison, BCFs were also determined for 5 traditional metal contaminants (TMCs; As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn). The main conclusions of the study were that: 1) BCF values for the REEs were consistently low in the studied vegetables;2) the BCFs for Ga and Nb were low as well;3) the BCFs for Tl were high relative to the other measured TCEs and the traditional metal contaminants; and 4) mean BCF values for the investigated TCEs were generally highest in chard and lowest in carrot. These findings provide initial evidence that there are likely to be real and present soil-plant transfer of TCEs, especially in the case of Tl. Improvements in analytical methods and detection limits will allow this to be further investigated in a wider variety of edible plants so that a risk profile may be developed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Technology-critical elements, Bioconcentration factor, Soil, Plant, Lettuce, Chard, Carrot, Food chain
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-92867 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2022.107504 (DOI)000871016500002 ()36122458 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85138024130 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2021–04592
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-09-28 (hanlid);

Funder: Linnaeus University; ALS Scandinavia AB; Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic (CZ.02.1.01/0.0/ 0.0/16_026/0008403); Scottish Government Strategic Research Program (2022-2027)

Available from: 2022-09-09 Created: 2022-09-09 Last updated: 2022-11-10Bibliographically approved
Pontér, S., Rodushkin, I., Engström, E., Rodushkina, K., Paulukat, C., Peinerud, E. & Widerlund, A. (2021). Early diagenesis of uranium in lakes receiving deep groundwater from the Kiruna mine, northern Sweden. Science of the Total Environment, 793, Article ID 148441.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early diagenesis of uranium in lakes receiving deep groundwater from the Kiruna mine, northern Sweden
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2021 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 793, article id 148441Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The uranium (U) concentrations and isotopic composition of waters and sediment cores were used to investigate the transport and accumulation of U in a water system (tailings pond, two lakes, and the Kalix River) receiving mine waters from the Kiruna mine. Concentrations of dissolved U decrease two orders of magnitude between the inflow of mine waters and in the Kalix River, while the concentration of the element bound to particulate matter increases, most likely due to sorption on iron‑manganese hydroxides and organic matter. The vertical distribution of U in the water column differs between two polluted lakes with a potential indication of dissolved U supply from sediment's pore waters at anoxic conditions. Since the beginning of exposure in the 1950s, U concentrations in lake sediments have increased >20-fold, reaching concentrations above 50 μg g-1. The distribution of anthropogenic U between the lakes does not follow the distribution of other mine water contaminants, with a higher relative proportion of U accumulating in the sediments of the second lake.

Concentrations of redox-sensitive elements in the sediment core as well as Fe isotopic composition were used to re-construct past redox-conditions potentially controlling early diagenesis of U in surface sediments. Two analytical techniques (ICP-SFMS and MC-ICP-MS) were used for the determination of U isotopic composition, providing an extra dimension in the understanding of processes in the system. The (234 U)/(238 U) activity ratio (AR) is rather uniform in the tailings pond but varies considerably in water and lake sediments providing a potential tracer for U transport from the Kiruna mine through the water system, and U immobilization in sediments. The U mass balance in the Rakkurijoki system as well as the amount of anthropogenic U accumulated in lake sediments were evaluated, indicating the immobilization in the two lakes of 170 kg and 285 kg U, respectively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Uranium, Isotope ratios, Mine water, Sediments
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-83282 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.148441 (DOI)000691588400003 ()34174600 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85108453840 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-06-28 (johcin);

Artikeln har tidigare förekommit som manuskript i avhandling

Available from: 2021-03-16 Created: 2021-03-16 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Pontér, S., Sutliff-Johansson, S., Engström, E., Widerlund, A., Mäki, A., Rodushkina, K., . . . Rodushkin, I. (2021). Evaluation of a Multi-Isotope Approach as a Complement to Concentration Data within Environmental Forensics. Minerals, 11(1), Article ID 37.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a Multi-Isotope Approach as a Complement to Concentration Data within Environmental Forensics
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2021 (English)In: Minerals, E-ISSN 2075-163X, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Heavy metal contamination was identified in groundwater monitoring wells surrounding a waste deposit facility at the Rönnskär Cu–Pb–Zn smelter in Skellefteå, Northern Sweden, as well as in brackish water and sediments from the nearby harbor. Following an investigative study of the surrounding area, brackish water from the Baltic Sea and sediments from a nearby harbor were also determined to be contaminated. This study investigated the ranges of isotopic compositions of four elements (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in smelter materials (ores, products, and waste) and polluted groundwater sediments of the affected area. The study’s objective was to evaluate the variability of the polluting source and identify possible isotope fractionation. This study further assesses the viability of using isotopic information to identify the source of the pollutant. These data were used in combination with multi-element screening analysis and multivariate statistical techniques. Expanding the number of elements utilized in isotope tracing empowers our abilities to decipher the source(s) and the extent of environmental exposure from contamination events related to mining and refining operations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
isotope ratios, smelter, natural variability, fractionation groundwater contamination, heavy metals
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-82484 (URN)10.3390/min11010037 (DOI)000610587200001 ()2-s2.0-85099152808 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional GrowthNorrbotten County Council
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-01-18 (alebob)

Available from: 2021-01-18 Created: 2021-01-18 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Augustsson, A., Qvarforth, A., Engström, E., Paulukat, C. & Rodushkin, I. (2021). Trace and major elements in food supplements of different origin: implications for daily intake levels and health risks. Toxicology reports, 8, 1067-1080
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trace and major elements in food supplements of different origin: implications for daily intake levels and health risks
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2021 (English)In: Toxicology reports, E-ISSN 2214-7500, Vol. 8, p. 1067-1080Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As the use of food supplements increases, voices are being raised questioning the safety of these products. As a contribution to understanding the trace and major elemental composition of food supplements and their potential health risks, this study presents concentrations of 71 elements in 138 supplements, categorised into synthetic products and three groups of products with natural ingredients. Concentrations were converted into average daily doses (ADDs) and compared to tolerable daily intakes (TDIs). For elements where we found significant ADDs relative to the TDI a comparison was also made to the normal dietary intake. Our main findings are that: 1) Most elements display highly variable concentrations in food supplements; more so than in normal foodstuff; 2) For ten of the analysed elements some products rendered ADDs > 50% of the TDI. Half of the elements were essential (Fe, Mn, Se, Mo, Zn), and as such motivated in food supplements. The other half (As, Pb, Cd, Al, Ni) represent non-essential and highly toxic elements, where the occurrence in food supplements ought to be viewed as contamination. Although none of these toxic metals were declared on any product’s table of content, several products gave high ADDs - in several cases even exceeding the TDIs; 3) The risk of reaching high ADDs for the toxic elements is strongly associated with products that contain marine ingredients (e.g. algae, mussels etc), and to some degree products of terrestrial plant-based origin. The health of consumers would benefit if food regulatory frameworks were updated to better address the risks of food supplements occasionally being contaminated with different toxic metals, for example by setting maximum permissible concentrations for a longer list of elements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Dietary supplements, Metals, Trace elements, Arsenic, Lead, Cadmium
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-84119 (URN)10.1016/j.toxrep.2021.04.012 (DOI)000701996600006 ()34094882 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85106466833 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-06-07 (johcin);

Forskningsfinansiärer: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences at the Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden & ALS Scandinavia AB.

Available from: 2021-05-04 Created: 2021-05-04 Last updated: 2023-02-03Bibliographically approved
Sutliff-Johansson, S., Pontér, S., Engström, E., Rodushkin, I., Peltola, P. & Widerlund, A. (2021). Tracing anthropogenic sources of Tantalum and Niobium in Bothnian Bay sediments, Sweden. Journal of Soils and Sediments, 21(3), 1488-1503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tracing anthropogenic sources of Tantalum and Niobium in Bothnian Bay sediments, Sweden
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Soils and Sediments, ISSN 1439-0108, E-ISSN 1614-7480, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 1488-1503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose This study aims to evaluate temporal trends of Tantalum (Ta) and Niobium (Nb) concentrations in northern Baltic Sea sediments with focus on the potential impact from the Ronnskar sulfide ore smelter, located 15 km east of Skelleftea in northern Sweden. The potential of Ta or Nb to serve as tracers for environmental pollution caused by the electronic waste is compared. Lastly, correlations between Ta and Nb concentrations and those of major redox elements are investigated. Methods A 35-cm-deep core was collected in the harbor bay (Kallholmsfjarden) outside of the smelter. A secondary 6-m-deep sediment core was collected in the deep Bothnian Bay for comparative purposes. Element screening analysis was conducted the using ICP-SFMS for the Kallhomsfjarden core and a combination of ICP-SFMS and ICP-OES for the Bothnian Bay core. In the final analysis, a 5-step sequential extraction technique was preformed to allow for better prediction of the fate and mobility of Ta and Nb. Results and discussion In the vicinity of the smelter, Ta concentration increases from 0.42 to 3.8 ppm from the time coinciding with the beginning of electronic waste processing. Conversely, Nb concentration remained stable at background levels throughout the core at 6.33 +/- 0.78 ppm. The Nb/Ta ratio thus changed from 14.5 to 1.7, reflecting an increase of anthropogenic input of Ta into the bay sediments. In the pre-industrial part of the sediment, concentrations of both elements follow concentration of aluminosilicates in the core. In recent sediments, however, the anthropogenic Ta exhibits an association with hydrous ferric oxides (HFOs) and organic matter. Conclusions Notable increases in Ta concentrations began following the beginning of scrap metal and electronic waste processing at the Ronnskar smelter. Anthropogenic Ta introduced in the upper portion of the sediment and are more associated with HFOs and organic material than natural Ta seen in the deeper parts of the core where detrital Ta is most common. Niobium was not affected by the Ronnskar smelter and displayed no notable change to the preindustrial background.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Technology-critical elements, Industrial smelter, Niobium, Tantalum, Contamination, Sediment
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-82257 (URN)10.1007/s11368-020-02852-4 (DOI)000598984200001 ()2-s2.0-85097371429 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Norrbotten County CouncilSwedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-03-08 (johcin)

Available from: 2021-01-11 Created: 2021-01-11 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sutliff-Johansson, S., Pontér, S., Mäki, A., Engström, E., Rodushkin, I., Peltola, P. & Widerlund, A. (2020). Groundwater environmental forensic investigation combining multivariate statistical techniques and screening analyses. Environmental Forensics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Groundwater environmental forensic investigation combining multivariate statistical techniques and screening analyses
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2020 (English)In: Environmental Forensics, ISSN 1527-5922, E-ISSN 1527-5930Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Heavy metal contamination was identified in groundwater monitoring wells surrounding a waste deposit facility at the Rönnskär Cu–Pb–Zn smelter in Skellefteå, northern Sweden. The main objective of this study is to identify the sources of contamination, utilizing element screening analyses and multivariate statistical techniques. A second objective is to determine the usefulness of these techniques in Environmental Forensics investigations of contaminated groundwater at a complex industrial site. Water samples were collected from four groundwater monitoring wells and six waste deposit cells surrounding the contaminated area. Seventy-two elements are statistically examined and the dataset is reduced to the variables representative of the contaminated source material from the smelting process. A three-component model is identified and explains 88% of the total variation in the dataset. Component 1 includes concentrations of Cd, Co, Ni, Rb, Re, and Zn. This component displays a high correlation with two of the deposit cells and their associated groundwater monitoring wells. Component 2 is comprised of Sb, Cu, and Mo. This component displays a correlation between all monitoring wells and deposits likely due to the high mobility of these elements as oxyanions. Component 3 is dominated by As and displays high correlation to three older deposit cells representing a completely different source than for Components 1 and 2. The application of screening analyses and multivariate statistics in this study has achieved a meaningful identification of sources of contamination in the investigated area. It was also shown to be useful as an initial survey aiming to optimize a full-scale monitoring program at the site.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Rönnskär, multivariate statistical techniques, principle component analysis, multi-elemental screening, groundwater contamination, heavy metals
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-81976 (URN)10.1080/15275922.2020.1850571 (DOI)000596328500001 ()2-s2.0-85097008086 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional GrowthNorrbotten County Council
Available from: 2020-12-14 Created: 2020-12-14 Last updated: 2023-09-05
Ecke, F., Benskin, J. P., Berglund, Å. M. .., de Wit, C. A., Engström, E., Plassmann, M. M., . . . Hörnfeldt, B. (2020). Spatio-temporal variation of metals and organic contaminants in bank voles (Myodes glareolus). Science of the Total Environment, 713, Article ID 136353.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatio-temporal variation of metals and organic contaminants in bank voles (Myodes glareolus)
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2020 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 713, article id 136353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental contamination with metals and organic compounds is of increasing concern for ecosystem and human health. Still, our knowledge about spatial distribution, temporal changes and ecotoxicological fate of metals and organic contaminants in wildlife is limited. We studied concentrations of 69 elements and 50 organic compounds in 300 bank voles (Myodes glareolus), Europe's most common mammal, sampled in spring and autumn 2017–2018 in five monitoring areas, representing three biogeographic regions. In addition, we compared measured concentrations with previous results from bank voles sampled within the same areas in 1995–1997 and 2001. In general, our results show regional differences, but no consistent patterns among contaminants and study areas. The exception was for the lowest concentrations of organic contaminants (e.g. perfluorooctane sulfonate, PFOS), which were generally found in the northern Swedish mountain area. Concentrations of metals and organic contaminants in adults varied seasonally with most organic contaminants being higher in spring; likely induced by diet shifts but potentially also related to age differences. In addition, metal concentrations varied between organs (liver vs. kidney), age classes (juveniles vs. adults; generally higher in adults) as well as between males and females. Concentrations of chromium and nickel in kidney and liver in the northernmost mountain area were lower in 2017–2018 than in 1995–1997 and in three of four areas, lead concentrations were lower in 2017–2018 than in 2001. Current metal concentrations (except mercury) are not expected to negatively affect the voles. Concentrations of hexachlorobenzene displayed highest concentrations in 2001 in the mountains, while it was close to detection limit in 2017–2018. Likewise, PFOS concentrations decreased in the mountains and in south-central lowland forests between 2001 and 2017–2018. Our results suggest that season, age class and sex need to be considered when designing and interpreting results from monitoring programs targeting inorganic and organic contaminants in wildlife.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Accumulation, Biomagnification, PFAS, PFOS, Small mammal, Sweden
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-77917 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.136353 (DOI)000514544700128 ()31955071 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077789606 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-03-02 (alebob)

Available from: 2020-03-02 Created: 2020-03-02 Last updated: 2023-09-14Bibliographically approved
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