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Körning-Ljungberg, JessicaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5546-3270
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 55) Show all publications
Elbe, P., Bäcklund, C., Vega-Mendoza, M., Sörman, D., Gavelin, H. M., Nyberg, L. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2023). Computerized Cognitive Interventions for Adults With ADHD: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Neuropsychology, 37(5), 519-530
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computerized Cognitive Interventions for Adults With ADHD: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
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2023 (English)In: Neuropsychology, ISSN 0894-4105, E-ISSN 1931-1559, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 519-530Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Treatments for adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are understudied, compared to children and adolescents with the same condition. In this systematic review and random-effects meta-analysis, we aim to evaluate the outcomes of computerized cognitive training (CCT) interventions in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including adults with ADHD.

Method: Cognitive outcomes and ADHD symptom severity were analyzed separately. In addition, the Cattell–Horn–Carroll (CHC) theory of cognitive abilities was used to categorize outcome variables into subdomains, which were analyzed separately in a subsequent analysis.

Results: The results revealed a small positive change in overall cognitive functioning, a measure of all cognitive outcomes in each study, for individuals who took part in CCT compared to controls (k = 9, Hedge’s g = 0.235, 95% CI [0.002, 0.467], p = 0.048, τ2 = 0.000, I2 = 0.000). However, neither symptom severity nor specific cognitive outcomes (executive functioning, cognitive speed, or working memory) showed a significant improvement.

Conclusions: We analyzed the risk of bias in the chosen studies and discuss the findings in terms of effect size. It is concluded that CCT has a small positive effect in adults with ADHD. Due to the lack of heterogeneity in intervention designs across the included studies, increased heterogeneity in future studies could help inform clinicians about the aspects of CCT, such as training type and length, that are most beneficial for this group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2023
Keywords
attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, computerized cognitive training, meta-analysis, systematic review, executive functions
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-96327 (URN)10.1037/neu0000890 (DOI)000946153700001 ()36892894 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150836585 (Scopus ID)
Funder
VinnovaKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-07-06 (sofila);

Available from: 2023-04-06 Created: 2023-04-06 Last updated: 2023-10-17Bibliographically approved
Marsh, J. E., Vachon, F., Sörqvist, P., Marsja, E., Röer, J. P., Richardson, B. H. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2023). Irrelevant changing-state vibrotactile stimuli disrupt verbal serial recall: implications for theories of interference in short-term memory. Journal of Cognitive Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Irrelevant changing-state vibrotactile stimuli disrupt verbal serial recall: implications for theories of interference in short-term memory
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 2044-5911, E-ISSN 2044-592XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

What causes interference in short-term memory? We report the novel finding that immediate memory for visually-presented verbal items is sensitive to disruption from task-irrelevant vibrotactile stimuli. Specifically, short-term memory for a visual sequence is disrupted by a concurrently presented sequence of vibrations, but only when the vibrotactile sequence entails change (when the sequence “jumps” between the two hands). The impact on visual-verbal serial recall was similar in magnitude to that for auditory stimuli (Experiment 1). Performance of the missing item task, requiring recall of item-identity rather than item-order, was unaffected by changing-state vibrotactile stimuli (Experiment 2), as with changing-state auditory stimuli. Moreover, the predictability of the changing-state sequence did not modulate the magnitude of the effect, arguing against an attention-capture conceptualisation (Experiment 3). Results support the view that interference in short-term memory is produced by conflict between incompatible, amodal serial-ordering processes (interference-by-process) rather than interference between similar representational codes (interference-by-content).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Short-term memory, cross-modal interference, vibrotactile distraction, auditory distraction, modality
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-96995 (URN)10.1080/20445911.2023.2198065 (DOI)2-s2.0-85152445126 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205Swedish Research Council, (2015-01116, 421-2011-1782)
Note

Funder: Bial Foundation (201/20); Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (2020–05626); Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (2211-0505)

Licens fulltext: CC BY License

Available from: 2023-05-03 Created: 2023-05-03 Last updated: 2023-05-08
Vega Mendoza, M., Sörman, D., Josefsson, M. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2022). A longitudinal study of episodic memory recall in multilinguals. International Journal of Bilingualism
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of episodic memory recall in multilinguals
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim:

This study investigates the effects of degree of multilingualism on cognitive functions in adulthood, with focus on episodic memory recall and including measures of verbal fluency as well as global cognition.

Design:

We studied a large population-based cohort cross-sectionally, and we also assessed changes over time through longitudinal measurements on four time-points over a 15 year period. Participants were drawn from the Betula prospective cohort study in Umeå, Sweden. The participants included in this study at baseline (n = 894, mean age = 51.44, 59.4% females) were divided according to number of languages into bilinguals (n = 395), trilinguals (n = 284), quadrilinguals (n = 169), and pentalinguals (n = 46).

Data and analysis:

We analysed performance on tasks of episodic memory recall, verbal fluency (letter and category) and global cognition (Minimental State Examination, MMSE) both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. The control background variables were baseline age, gender, years of education, general fluid ability Gf (Wechsler Block Design Test), and socioeconomic status. We employed a linear mixed modelling approach with entropy balancing weights to assess effects of degree of multilingualism on cognitive functions.

Findings and conclusions:

Using bilinguals as the reference group, our results indicated that all the other multilingual groups exhibited superior performance on episodic memory recall than bilinguals at baseline. The rate of change over time did not differ for trilinguals and pentalinguals compared to bilinguals. While quadrilinguals declined more over time than bilinguals, they still scored significantly higher than bilinguals at the last test wave. For letter fluency, similarly, all language groups scored higher than bilinguals at baseline, and none of the groups differed from bilinguals in rate of change over time. With regard to category fluency, quadrilinguals scored higher than bilinguals at baseline, but trilinguals and pentalinguals did not differ from bilinguals and none of the groups differed in change over time compared to bilinguals. Finally, for global cognition (MMSE), trilinguals and quadrilinguals scored significantly higher than bilinguals at baseline with no differences in change over time for any of the groups relative to bilinguals. Our study contributes to the understanding of multilingual cognition and sheds light into an under-researched cognitive domain known to decline in normal ageing, namely episodic memory recall.

Significance:

Our study emphasizes the importance of researching less explored aspects of multilingualism on cognition, in particular on episodic memory recall, to aid our understanding of factors that could potentially aid cognitive decline in later adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Ageing, bilingualism, multilingualism, episodic memory, verbal fluency, cognition
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-95237 (URN)10.1177/13670069221139155 (DOI)000903112200001 ()2-s2.0-85145283211 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 1988-0082:17; J2001-0682Swedish Research Council, K2010-61X-21446-01; 345-2003-3883; 315-2004-6977
Note

Funder: Swedish Council for Planning and Coordination of Research (Forskningsrådsnämnden) (grant nos. D1988-0092, D1989-0115, D1990-0074, D1991-0258, D1992-0143, D1997-0756, D1997-1841, D1999-0739 and B1999-474); Swedish Council for Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences (grant  no.  F377/1988-2000); Swedish Council for Social Research (grant nos. 1988-1990: 88-0082 and 311/1991-2000)

Available from: 2023-01-16 Created: 2023-01-16 Last updated: 2023-09-05
Bäcklund, C., Elbe, P., Gavelin, H. M., Sörman, D. E. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2022). Gaming motivations and gaming disorder symptoms: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 11(3), 667-688
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gaming motivations and gaming disorder symptoms: A systematic review and meta-analysis
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, ISSN 2062-5871, E-ISSN 2063-5303, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 667-688Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to synthesize the available literature on the relationship between gaming motivations and gaming disorder symptoms. Specifically, to (1) explore what gaming motivation questionnaires and classifications are used in studies on gaming disorder symptoms and (2) investigate the relationship between motivational factors and symptoms of gaming disorder. Method: An electronic database search was conducted via EBSCO (MEDLINE and PsycINFO) and the Web of Science Core Collection. All studies using validated measurements on gaming disorder symptoms and gaming motivations and available correlation coefficients of the relationship between gaming disorder and gaming motivations were included. The meta-analyses were conducted using a random-effects model. Results: In total, 49 studies (k = 58 independent sub-samples), including 51,440 participants, out of which 46 studies (k = 55 sub-samples, n = 49,192 participants) provided data for the meta-analysis. The synthesis identified fourteen different gaming motivation instruments, seven unique motivation models, and 26 motivational factors. The meta-analysis showed statistically significant associations between gaming disorder symptoms and 23 out of 26 motivational factors, with the majority of the pooled mean effect sizes ranging from small to moderate. Moreover, large heterogeneity was observed, and the calculated prediction intervals indicated substantial variation in effects across populations and settings. Motivations related to emotional escape were robustly associated with gaming disorder symptoms. Discussion and conclusions: The present meta-analysis reinforces the importance of motivational factors in understanding problematic gaming behavior. The analysis showed significant heterogeneity in most outcomes, warranting further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Akademiai Kiado, 2022
Keywords
meta-analysis, systematic review, gaming disorder, addiction, problematic gaming, motivation
National Category
Psychiatry Substance Abuse
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-93244 (URN)10.1556/2006.2022.00053 (DOI)000864860900004 ()36094861 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85139853140 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Vinnova, 2021-02361Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-01111Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2021-0103
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-11-28 (sofila)

Available from: 2022-09-26 Created: 2022-09-26 Last updated: 2023-05-08Bibliographically approved
Sörman, D. E., Dahl, K. E., Lindmark, D., Hansson, P., Vega Mendoza, M. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2022). Relationships between Dota 2 expertise and decision-making ability. PLOS ONE, 17(3), Article ID e0264350.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships between Dota 2 expertise and decision-making ability
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2022 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 3, article id e0264350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Esports is an often time-consuming activity that has become increasingly popular with billions of players all over the world. The objective of this study was to investigate if there is a relationship between skill level in the strategy video game Dota 2, a game that places many demands on decision making to be successful, and decision making under ambiguity and experience as measured by performance in the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), a task known to have ecological validity. Two indicators of players’ performance in Dota 2, namely match-making rating (MMR) and Medal, were used as predictors of performance in the IGT in path models. Results showed that Medal was a significant predictor of performance in IGT, while MMR score was borderline significant. The cognitive reflection task, included in the models as an indicator of the ability to engage in conscious, analytical, rational, and logical thinking, was a significant predictor of performance in IGT, and was significantly and positively related to MMR. The findings from this study give insight into the cognitive demands related to performance in Dota 2. Although results suggest that strategy video gaming may be a factor that contributes to increased decision making abilities, a reversed relationship is also possible, whereby individuals who are better at decision making are also more likely to become successful in Dota-2. More studies, preferably longitudinal, are needed to replicate the findings of this study and to establish the directionality between factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2022
National Category
Psychology Computer Sciences
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-89749 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0264350 (DOI)000849744700017 ()35231043 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85125583697 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-03-18 (joosat)

Available from: 2022-03-18 Created: 2022-03-18 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sehlström, M., Ljungberg, J. K., Claeson, A. & Nyström, M. B. T. (2022). The relation of neuroticism to physiological and behavioral stress responses induced by auditory startle. Brain and Behavior, 12(5), Article ID e2554.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relation of neuroticism to physiological and behavioral stress responses induced by auditory startle
2022 (English)In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e2554Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction The negative cognitive effects of the startle response are not yet fully understood. Ecological observations in the aviation field indicate risk for severe outcomes in complex or pressured situations, while sparse previous research suggests milder negative effects on simple cognitive tasks. Neuroticism is proposed as a factor related to the level of negative effects following startle.

Methods This study examined the effects of startle on performance in a choice reaction time task and analyzed relations between performance, neuroticism, and physiological stress.

Results Our results indicate that reaction time directly following startle was not affected, but reaction time in subsequent trials was significantly slower. Neuroticism and physiological stress were both unrelated to this performance effect.

Discussion We argue that higher complexity/demand tasks are necessary to complement the research on base cognitive functioning in relation to startle. If neuroticism is related to startle effects, this is more likely to be found in these higher demand situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
Personality, Pilot, Stress, Cognitive, Performance
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-90156 (URN)10.1002/brb3.2554 (DOI)000780133000001 ()35403836 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127977134 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-05-31 (johcin);

Funder: Saab Support and Services division; Industrial Doctoral School at Umeå University 

Available from: 2022-04-11 Created: 2022-04-11 Last updated: 2023-09-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Stenling, A., Sundström, A., Rönnlund, M., Vega Mendoza, M., Hansson, P. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2021). Occupational cognitive complexity and episodic memory in old age. Intelligence, 89, Article ID 101598.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational cognitive complexity and episodic memory in old age
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2021 (English)In: Intelligence, ISSN 0160-2896, E-ISSN 1873-7935, Vol. 89, article id 101598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate occupational cognitive complexity of main lifetime occupation in relation to level and 15-year change in episodic memory recall in a sample of older adults (≥ 65 years, n = 780). We used latent growth curve modelling with occupational cognitive complexity (O*NET indicators) as independent variable. Subgroup analyses in a sample of middle-aged (mean: 49.9 years) men (n = 260) were additionally performed to investigate if a general cognitive ability (g) factor at age 18 was predictive of future occupational cognitive complexity and cognitive performance in midlife. For the older sample, a higher level of occupational cognitive complexity was related to a higher level of episodic recall (β = 0.15, p < .001), but the association with rate of change (β = 0.03, p = .64) was not statistically significant. In the middle-aged sample, g at age 18 was both directly (β = 0.19, p = .01) and indirectly (via years of education after age 18, ab = 0.19) predictive of midlife levels of occupational cognitive complexity. Cognitive ability at age 18 was also a direct predictor of midlife episodic recall (β = 0.60, p ≤ 0.001). Critically, entry of the early adult g factor attenuated the association between occupational complexity and cognitive level (from β = 0.21, p = .01 to β = 0.12, p = .14). Overall, our results support a pattern of preserved differentiation from early to late adulthood for individuals with different histories of occupational complexity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Occupational cognitive complexity, Cognitive reserve, Intelligence, Episodic memory, Preserved differentiation
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-87863 (URN)10.1016/j.intell.2021.101598 (DOI)000720544800001 ()2-s2.0-85118684966 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, K2010-61X-21446-01Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, dnr 2013–2056Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Swedish Research Council, dnr 2017-00273Swedish Research Council, 2007–2653
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-11-11 (beamah)

Available from: 2021-11-11 Created: 2021-11-11 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Stenling, A., Eriksson Sörman, D., Lindwall, M., Hansson, P., Körning Ljungberg, J. & Machado, L. (2021). Physical activity and cognitive function: between-person and within-person associations and moderators. Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, 28(3), 392-417
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity and cognitive function: between-person and within-person associations and moderators
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2021 (English)In: Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, ISSN 1382-5585, E-ISSN 1744-4128, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 392-417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the present study, we decomposed between- and within-person effects and examined moderators of the longitudinal physical activity-cognition association. Participants (N = 1722) were drawn from the Betula study and we included four waves of data across 15 years. Bayesian multilevel modeling showed that self-reported physical activity did not predict changes in cognitive function. Physical activity positively predicted cognitive performance at baseline, and the relations were stronger for more active (compared to less active) older adults. Physical activity had a positive within-person effect on cognitive function. The within-person effect of physical activity on episodic memory recall was stronger for participants who on average engaged in less physical activity. The within-person effect on verbal fluency was stronger for participants with more education. Our results suggest that preserving cognitive functioning in old age might be more a matter of what you do in old age than reflecting what you did earlier in life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Betula study, cognitive functioning, aging, physical activity, within-person effects
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-79935 (URN)10.1080/13825585.2020.1779646 (DOI)000546793700001 ()32564660 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087167452 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00273, D1988-0092, D1989-0115, D1990-0074, D1991-0258, D1992-0143, D1997-0756, D1997-1841,D1999-0739, B1999-474, F377/1988-2000, 1988-1990: 88-0082, 311/1991-2000, 345-2003-3883, 315-2004-6977Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205, K2010-61X-21446-01Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 1988-0082:17, J2001-0682
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-03-01 (alebob)

Available from: 2020-06-23 Created: 2020-06-23 Last updated: 2023-09-14Bibliographically approved
Vega Mendoza, M., Hansson, P., Sörman, D. E. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2021). Testing the Foreign Language Effect on Cognitive Reflection in Older Adults. Brain Sciences, 11(11), Article ID 1527.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing the Foreign Language Effect on Cognitive Reflection in Older Adults
2021 (English)In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 1527Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increasing number of people around the world communicate in more than one language, resulting in them having to make decisions in a foreign language on a daily basis. Interestingly, a burgeoning body of literature suggests that people’s decision-making is affected by whether they are reasoning in their native language (NL) or their foreign language (FL). According to the foreign language effect (FLe), people are less susceptible to bias in many decision-making tasks and more likely to display utilitarian cost-benefit analysis in moral decision-making when reasoning in a FL. While these differences have often been attributed to a reduced emotionality in the FL, an emerging body of literature has started to test the extent to which these could be attributable to increased deliberation in the FL. The present study tests whether increased deliberation leads to a FLe on cognitive reflection in a population of older adults (Mage = 65.1), from the successful aging project in Umeå, Sweden. We explored whether performance on a 6-item version of the cognitive reflection test (CRT) adapted to Swedish would differ between participants for whom Swedish was their NL and those for whom Swedish was their FL. The CRT is a task designed to elicit an incorrect, intuitive answer. In order to override the intuitive answer, one requires engaging in deliberative, analytical thinking to determine the correct answer. Therefore, we hypothesized that if thinking in a FL increases deliberation, then those performing the task in their FL would exhibit higher accuracy rates than those performing in their NL. Our results showed that age and level of education predicted performance on the task but performance on the CRT did not differ between the NL and the FL groups. In addition, in the FL group, proficiency in the FL was not related to performance in the CRT. Our results, therefore, do not provide evidence that thinking in a FL increases deliberation in a group of older adults performing a logical reasoning task that is not typically associated with an emotional connotation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
foreign language effect, bilingualism, multilingualism, aging, older adulthood, decision-making, reasoning
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-88107 (URN)10.3390/brainsci11111527 (DOI)000725335200001 ()34827525 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85119921067 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-12-01 (johcin)

Available from: 2021-11-30 Created: 2021-11-30 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, L., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Eriksson Sörman, D., Hansson, P., Herlitz, A., Kauppi, K., . . . Adolfsson, R. (2020). Biological and environmental predictors of heterogeneity in neurocognitive ageing: Evidence from Betula and other longitudinal studies. Ageing Research Reviews, 64, Article ID 101184.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biological and environmental predictors of heterogeneity in neurocognitive ageing: Evidence from Betula and other longitudinal studies
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2020 (English)In: Ageing Research Reviews, ISSN 1568-1637, E-ISSN 1872-9649, Vol. 64, article id 101184Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individual differences in cognitive performance increase with advancing age, reflecting marked cognitive changes in some individuals along with little or no change in others. Genetic and lifestyle factors are assumed to influence cognitive performance in aging by affecting the magnitude and extent of age-related brain changes (i.e., brain maintenance or atrophy), as well as the ability to recruit compensatory processes. The purpose of this review is to present findings from the Betula study and other longitudinal studies, with a focus on clarifying the role of key biological and environmental factors assumed to underlie individual differences in brain and cognitive aging. We discuss the vital importance of sampling, analytic methods, consideration of non-ignorable dropout, and related issues for valid conclusions on factors that influence healthy neurocognitive aging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
ageing, memory, longitudinal, brain, genetics, lifestyle, brain maintenance
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-80972 (URN)10.1016/j.arr.2020.101184 (DOI)000595935300003 ()32992046 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85092710312 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-10-27 (alebob)

Available from: 2020-09-29 Created: 2020-09-29 Last updated: 2021-01-11Bibliographically approved
Projects
Junior researcher: Warning! Investigating what auditory alarms affect attention and performance in complex settings. [2011-00505_Forte]; Umeå UniversityAn empirical investigation of distraction by unexpected auditory and vibratiory stimuli [2011-01782_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5546-3270

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