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Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Sörqvist, P., Körning-Ljungberg, J. & Ljung, R. (2010). A sub-process view of working memory capacity: evidence from effects of speech on prose memory (ed.). Memory, 18(3), 310-326
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A sub-process view of working memory capacity: evidence from effects of speech on prose memory
2010 (English)In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 310-326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we outline a framework labelled the "sub-process view" for understanding correlations between working memory capacity (WMC) and other phenomena. This view suggests that "WMC = sub-process1 + sub-process2 + ... + sub-processn" and that any relationship between WMC and another construct is actually a relationship with a specific sub-process covered by the WMC construct. Furthermore, different sub-processes are functionally distinct and they can be measured by specific intrusion errors on WMC tasks. We show that a sub-process (measured by immediate/current-list intrusions) is related to the effects of speech on prose memory (semantic auditory distraction), whereas another sub-process (measured by delayed/prior-list intrusions) is not (Experiment 1 and 2). Furthermore, we developed a new WMC task ("size-comparison span") and found that the relationship between WMC (measured with "operation span") and semantic auditory distraction is actually a relationship between a sub-process (measured by current-list intrusions in our new task) and semantic auditory distraction (Experiment 2). In contrast, previous research has shown that delayed intrusions underlie the correlation between WMC and reading comprehension, whereas immediate intrusions are unrelated to reading comprehension. Taken together, we argue that WMC is related to semantic auditory distraction and reading comprehension for entirely different reasons.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14786 (URN)10.1080/09658211003601530 (DOI)000277650200008 ()2-s2.0-77951688758 (Scopus ID)e3578010-6ba2-11de-9f57-000ea68e967b (Local ID)e3578010-6ba2-11de-9f57-000ea68e967b (Archive number)e3578010-6ba2-11de-9f57-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2010; 20090708 (jeskor)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Parmentier, F. B. .., Elsley, J. V. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2010). Behavioral distraction by auditory novelty is not only about novelty: the role of the distracter’s informational value (ed.). Cognition, 115(3), 504-511
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral distraction by auditory novelty is not only about novelty: the role of the distracter’s informational value
2010 (English)In: Cognition, ISSN 0010-0277, E-ISSN 1873-7838, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 504-511Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Unexpected events often distract us. In the laboratory, novel auditory stimuli have been shown to capture attention away from a focal visual task and yield specific electrophysiological responses as well as a behavioral cost to performance. Distraction is thought to follow ineluctably from the sound’s low probability of occurrence or, put more simply, its unexpected occurrence. Our study challenges this view with respect to behavioral distraction and argues that past research failed to identify the informational value of sound as a mediator of novelty distraction. We report an experiment showing that (1) behavioral novelty distraction is only observed when the sound announces the occurrence and timing of an upcoming visual target (as is the case in all past research); (2) that no such distraction is observed for deviant sounds conveying no such information; and that (3) deviant sounds can actually facilitate performance when these, but not the standards, convey information. We conclude that behavioral novelty distraction, as observed in oddball tasks, is observed in the presence of novel sounds but only when the cognitive system can take advantage of the auditory distracters to optimize performance.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9315 (URN)10.1016/j.cognition.2010.03.002 (DOI)000280433500012 ()2-s2.0-77951666053 (Scopus ID)7ea869c0-3836-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (Local ID)7ea869c0-3836-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (Archive number)7ea869c0-3836-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2010; 20100325 (ysko)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Körning-Ljungberg, J. & Parmentier, F. (2010). Psychological effects of combined noise and whole body vibration: a review and avenues for future research (ed.). Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part D, journal of automobile engineering, 224(D10), 1289-1302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological effects of combined noise and whole body vibration: a review and avenues for future research
2010 (English)In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part D, journal of automobile engineering, ISSN 0954-4070, E-ISSN 2041-2991, Vol. 224, no D10, p. 1289-1302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vehicle drivers are often exposed to noise, whole-body vibrations (WBV) and mental loads, but the knowledge of how combined effects from multiple environmental stressors affect mental load is sparse. Studies have shown that the effect of one factor may be different than the effect of two factors presented together. For example, negative combined effects have been found when people perform mental tasks (e.g., Sommer and Harris, 1973; Harris and Schoenberger, 1980), as well as in subjective ratings (e.g., Ljungberg, Neely, Lundström, 2004). Although some of the studies investigating the combined effects of noise and WBV suffer from low ecological validity and few have investigated the possible effects on higher cognitive functions. Applying methods well-known to be sensitive to sound exposures by using serial recall tasks (e.g., Jones, Madden & Miles, 1992) as well as methods developed in the studies of noise after-effects (e.g., Glass & Singer, 1972) may be a way to continue the research field of combined effects of noise and WBV

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12714 (URN)10.1243/09544070JAUTO1315 (DOI)000282592100004 ()2-s2.0-77957747573 (Scopus ID)be13e630-6ba3-11de-9f57-000ea68e967b (Local ID)be13e630-6ba3-11de-9f57-000ea68e967b (Archive number)be13e630-6ba3-11de-9f57-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2010; 20090708 (jeskor)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Körning-Ljungberg, J., Parmentier, F. & Elsley, J. (2009). An empirical investigation of the capture of attention by urgent and non-urgent alarms (ed.). In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at Psychonomic Society. Annual meeting : 19/11/2009 - 22/11/2009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An empirical investigation of the capture of attention by urgent and non-urgent alarms
2009 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Studies aiming to establish what constitutes an efficient auditory alarm have used subjective ratings to measure perceived urgency. Such studies have suggested that words spoken urgently are rated as more urgent than words spoken non-urgently. The present study aimed to measure objectively the potency of alarms to capture attention away from a focal task using a cross-modal oddball paradigm. Participants judged the parity of visual digits while ignoring task-irrelevant sounds. On most trials, a sine wave tone (standard) preceded each digit. On rare trials, the standard was replaced by a spoken word (novel). All novels distracted participants from the visual task, with urgent alarms yielding faster response latencies than non-urgent alarms. Subjective ratings confirmed that participants rated urgently spoken words as more urgent. Future work should examine whether our findings reflect perceptual differences between urgent and non-urgent novels, or the speeding up of visual targets by urgent novels.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-40628 (URN)fd2f9c80-cdee-11de-b769-000ea68e967b (Local ID)fd2f9c80-cdee-11de-b769-000ea68e967b (Archive number)fd2f9c80-cdee-11de-b769-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Conference
Psychonomic Society. Annual meeting : 19/11/2009 - 22/11/2009
Note

Godkänd; 2009; 20091110 (jeskor)

Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
Körning-Ljungberg, J., Parmentier, F. & Elsley, J. (2009). Attention captured - what constitutes a good alarm? (ed.). In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at Auditory Perception, Cognition, and Action Meeting : 18/11/2009 - 18/11/2009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attention captured - what constitutes a good alarm?
2009 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Most high risk occupations involve a stressful environment and auditory alarms designed to capture operator's attention and alert them about potential incidents. Most studies on auditory alarms have been conducted using subjective measurements to explore, for example, perceived urgency, highlighting factor such as the spoken intonation as important. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of intonation and valence on behavioral performance in using a cross-modal oddball measuring the involuntary capture of attention by sound. Participants judged if visually presented digits were odd or even while exposed to task-irrelevant sounds. In 80% of the trials, a sine wave tone (standard) preceded each digit, while on 20% of the trials the standard was replaced by a spoken word (novel). Novels varied in semantic valence (negative versus neutral) and intonation (urgent versus calm). Subjective ratings of perceived "urgency" and "attention grabbingness" were subsequently collected for these words from the same participants. The results revealed that, compared to the standard condition, all novels increased accuracy slightly and equally. Response latencies proved more sensitive, however, yielding a reduced distraction effect for urgent than non-urgent words, while the words' valence had no impact. The results from the subjective ratings on the other hand showed that both the words urgency and content increased significantly perceived "urgency" and "attention grabbingness". In conclusion, some of our findings fit well with alarm studies on alarms using subjective ratings and their assumption that subjective ratings are valuable for the design of better alarms. However, our results also highlight the lack of correspondence between subjective and objective measures of attention capture with respect to the words' content.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-32249 (URN)6acebb10-cded-11de-b769-000ea68e967b (Local ID)6acebb10-cded-11de-b769-000ea68e967b (Archive number)6acebb10-cded-11de-b769-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Conference
Auditory Perception, Cognition, and Action Meeting : 18/11/2009 - 18/11/2009
Note

Godkänd; 2009; 20091110 (jeskor)

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2009). Combined exposures of noise and whole-body vibration and the effects on psychological responses: a review (ed.). Noise & Vibration Bulletin, 198-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combined exposures of noise and whole-body vibration and the effects on psychological responses: a review
2009 (English)In: Noise & Vibration Bulletin, ISSN 0144-7785, p. 198-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this review is to shed light on a research area that concerns the studies of psychological responses to combined exposures of noise and whole-body vibration (WBV). Vehicle drivers are a group of workers that are often exposed to multiple stressors like noise, WBV and mental loads. Degraded performance because of environmental stressors may lead to injury or accidents. Standards that govern health risk assessment do not take into consideration the complexities of these multiple exposure environments (ISO 1997a, ISO 1999). Some studies have shown that the effect of one factor may be different than the effect of two factors presented together. For example, negative combined effects have been found in tracking tasks (Sommer and Harris, 1973), in arithmetic tasks (Harris and Schoenberger, 1980), as well as in subjective ratings (Ljungberg, Neely, Lundstrom, 2004), although in many of the studies the noise and WBV stimuli have been very unlike those that can be found in real working environments. Applying methods from the 'irrelevant sound' paradigm (e.g. Jones, 1990) by using short-term memory tasks with a serial component as well as focus on frequencies rather than level has been revealed to tap the resources both objectively and subjectively more in both noise and WBV studies (e.g. Banbury et al. 2001; Kjellberg, 1990). Still, most experiments that have been conducted have focused on rather short exposure times in controlled laboratory settings. Using longer exposure times might also reveal other results since longer exposure times may be negatively related to sensitivity to noise and WBV (Abbate et al. 2004; Neely, Lundstrom, and Bjorkvist, 2002, Weinstein, J 978).

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11843 (URN)adde40d0-9ba4-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (Local ID)adde40d0-9ba4-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (Archive number)adde40d0-9ba4-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note

Godkänd; 2009; 20100730 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
Parmentier, F., Elsley, J. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2009). The involuntary capture of attention by novel sounds: is it really about novelty? (ed.). In: (Ed.), APCAM 2009: 8th Annual Auditory Perception, Cognition, and Action Meeting Thursday November 19 Boston Sheraton Hotel Boston, MA, USA. Paper presented at Auditory Perception, Cognition, and Action Meeting : 18/11/2009 - 18/11/2009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The involuntary capture of attention by novel sounds: is it really about novelty?
2009 (English)In: APCAM 2009: 8th Annual Auditory Perception, Cognition, and Action Meeting Thursday November 19 Boston Sheraton Hotel Boston, MA, USA, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Unexpected events often distract us. In the laboratory, novel auditory stimuli have been shown to capture attention away from a focal visual task and yield specific electrophysiological responses as well as a behavioral cost to performance. This phenomenon is thought to follow ineluctably from the sound's low probability of occurrence or, put more simply, its unexpected occurrence. Our study challenges this view and argues that past research failed to identify the informational value of sound as a mediator of novelty distraction. We report an experiment showing that (1) novelty distraction is only observed when the sound announces the occurrence and timing of an upcoming visual target (as is the case in all past research); (2) that no such distraction is observed for deviant sounds conveying no such information; and that (3) deviant sounds can actually facilitate performance when these, but not the standards, convey information. We conclude that novelty distraction is observed in the presence of novel sounds but only when the cognitive system can take advantage of the auditory distracters to optimize performance.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-27997 (URN)1a27c540-cdf1-11de-b769-000ea68e967b (Local ID)1a27c540-cdf1-11de-b769-000ea68e967b (Archive number)1a27c540-cdf1-11de-b769-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Conference
Auditory Perception, Cognition, and Action Meeting : 18/11/2009 - 18/11/2009
Note

Godkänd; 2009; 20091110 (jeskor)

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2008). Aktivitet: Perception- from sensation to representation (ed.). Paper presented at .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aktivitet: Perception- from sensation to representation
2008 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-36807 (URN)f9e01dd0-9536-11dd-aadc-000ea68e967b (Local ID)f9e01dd0-9536-11dd-aadc-000ea68e967b (Archive number)f9e01dd0-9536-11dd-aadc-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Land: Sverige; Ort: Umeå; Startdatum: 03/10/2008; Roll: Deltagare; Typ: Övrigt (t.ex. priser, externa föreläsningar och andra aktiviteter) - Extern undervisning och ämnessamordningAvailable from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2008). Aktivitet: Resestipendium ifrån FAS (ed.). Paper presented at .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aktivitet: Resestipendium ifrån FAS
2008 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-36454 (URN)41863fc0-9537-11dd-aadc-000ea68e967b (Local ID)41863fc0-9537-11dd-aadc-000ea68e967b (Archive number)41863fc0-9537-11dd-aadc-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Land: Sverige; Startdatum: 11/11/2008; Roll: Deltagare; Typ: Övrigt (t.ex. priser, externa föreläsningar och andra aktiviteter) - Priser, stipendier, utmärkelserAvailable from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2008). Auditory attentional capture: dissociations between objective and subjective indices (ed.). In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at Annual Auditory Perception, Cognition, and Action Meeting : 13/11/2008 - 13/11/2008.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auditory attentional capture: dissociations between objective and subjective indices
2008 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

With relevance to auditory alarm design, we examined whether the semanticity of spoken words (Negatively-valenced vs Neutral; Non-words vs words; Action vs non-Action words) and their intonation-style ("urgent" vs. "calm") modulate the extent to which words capture attention from a visually-presented serial recall task (objective measure) and whether these behavioural effects map onto subjective ratings of "Perceived urgency" and "Attention grabbingness" (subjective measure). Compared to quiet or a repeated tone, the infrequent presentation of a spoken word captured attention-as indexed by an impairment of serial recall-but there were no effects of semanticity or intonation. However, action words were rated as more urgent and attention-grabbing than neutral words which were rated as more urgent and attention-grabbing than non-words. "Urgent" words were also rated higher in urgency and attention grabbingness than "calm" words regardless of valence. The results question the utility of subjective ratings for the purpose of spoken-alarm design.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-32199 (URN)69f6cc10-9535-11dd-aadc-000ea68e967b (Local ID)69f6cc10-9535-11dd-aadc-000ea68e967b (Archive number)69f6cc10-9535-11dd-aadc-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Conference
Annual Auditory Perception, Cognition, and Action Meeting : 13/11/2008 - 13/11/2008
Note

Godkänd; 2008; 20081008 (jeskor)

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
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