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Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Kharseh, M., Altorkmany, L., Al-Khawaja, M. & Hassani, F. (2014). Combined Effect of Global Warming and Buildings Envelope on the Performance of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems. In: İbrahim Dinçer; Adnan Midilli; Haydar Kucuk (Ed.), Progress in Sustainable Energy Technologies: Generating Renewable Energy (pp. 299-315). Paper presented at . Berlin: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combined Effect of Global Warming and Buildings Envelope on the Performance of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems
2014 (English)In: Progress in Sustainable Energy Technologies: Generating Renewable Energy, Berlin: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2014, p. 299-315Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Heating and cooling systems as well as domestic hot water account for over 50 % of the world’s energy consumption. Due to their high thermal performance, ground source heat pump systems (GSHP) have been increasingly used to reduce energy consumption. The thermal performance of GSHP systems strongly depends on the temperature difference between indoor and ground operation temperature. This temperature difference is a function of mean annual air temperature and energy demand for heating and cooling over the year. The thermal load of a building, on the other hand is influenced by the thermal quality of the building envelope (TQBE) and outdoor temperature. Over the time, there is a change in heating and cooling load of buildings due to two reasons; improving the comfort requirements and outdoor temperature change. The overall aim of the current work is to study the impact of climatic changes in combination with TQBE on driving energy of GSHP. This was achieved by comparing the driving energy of the GSHP for different global warming (GW) scenarios and different TQBE. Under climate conditions of selected cities (Stockholm, Roma, and Riyadh), the current study shows that GW reduces the driving energy of GSHPs in cold climates. In contrast, GW increases the driving energy of GSHPs in hot climates. Also it was shown that buildings with poor TQBE are more sensitive to GW. Furthermore, the improvement of TQBE reduces the driving energy more in cold climates than in hot or mild climates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2014
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-20734 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-07896-0_15 (DOI)2-s2.0-84948649209 (Scopus ID)77104155-7e75-48f3-900d-3cb47dd504ef (Local ID)978-3-319-07895-3 (ISBN)978-3-319-07896-0 (ISBN)77104155-7e75-48f3-900d-3cb47dd504ef (Archive number)77104155-7e75-48f3-900d-3cb47dd504ef (OAI)
Note

Godkänd; 2014; 20141030 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Kharseh, M. (2012). Ground-source heat pumps and energy saving (ed.). In: (Ed.), Jovan Mitrovic (Ed.), Heat Exchangers: Basics Design Applications. Paper presented at . : IN-TECH
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ground-source heat pumps and energy saving
2012 (English)In: Heat Exchangers: Basics Design Applications, IN-TECH, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The global warming itself and its consequences cause considerable problems. It results in extreme climate events such as droughts, floods, or hurricanes, which are expected to become more frequent. This puts extra strain on people and has great impact on public health and life quality especially in poor countries. Internationally, there is a political understanding that global warming (or climate change) is the main challenge of the world for decades to come. Thus, all states must work together in order to overcome climatic change consequences. Although, studies suggest that there is indeed relationship between solar variability and global warming (Lean and Rind, 2001), two causes of the warming have been suggested: 1. related to the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere; 2. related to heat emissions (Nordell, 2003, Nordell and Gervet, 2009). This implies that current warming is anthropogenic and caused by human activities, i.e. global use of non-renewable energy. So far, the total global energy consumption has already exceeded 15.1010 MWh/year and it is projected to have an annual growth rate about 1.4 % until 2020 (EIA, 2010). Much of the energy used worldwide is mainly supplied by fossil fuels (~85 % of the global energy demand while renewable energy sources supply only about 6 %) (Moomaw et al., 2011, Jaber et al., 2011). Consequently, about 3.1010 ton of carbon dioxide emissions are annualllt emitted into the atmosphere. In other word, for each consumed kWh about 205 kg of carbon dioxide is being emitted into the atmosphere. Observations provide evidence that rising atmospheric CO2 level, which has increased by 25% last century caused by human activities, are associated with rising global temperature. There is mounting evidence that the mean global temperature has increased over the period 1880 to 1985 by 0.5 to 0.7 oC (Hansen and Lebedeff, 1987). While surface air temperature (SAT) compilations shows that SAT has increased 1.2 oC last century. If a current climatic change trend continues, climate models predict that the average global temperature are likely to have risen by 4 to 6 oC by the end of 21st century (Gaterell, 2005). Owing to the awareness of the impact of global warming and its relationship with human activities, there has been a growing interest in reducing fossil energy consumptions. Specifically, more efficient use of energy and increased use of renewable energy seem to be our main weapon against the ongoing global warming. In addition, as oil is a finite natural resource and subject to depletion, the oil price will increase and become more unstable and, consequently, economic risks will arise and economic grow rates will become unstable too. In another word, reducing our primary energy use as well as switching to a renewable energy system seem to be an urgent issue in order to have a stable future. Heating and cooling in the industrial, commercial, and domestic sectors accounts for about 40-50 % of the world’s total delivered energy consumption (IEA, 2007, Seyboth et al., 2008). Although, buildings regulations aim to reduce the thermal loads of buildings, as the economic growth improves standards of living, the energy demand for heating and cooling is projected to increase. For example, in non-OECD nations, as developing nations mature, the amount of energy used in buildings sector is rapidly increasing. Consequently, the implementation of more efficient heating/cooling systems is of clear potential to save energy and environment. However, the use of renewable energy systems for heating and cooling applications has received relatively little attention compared with other applications such as renewable electricity or biofuels for transportation. Yet, renewable energy sources supply only around 2-3% of annual global heating and cooling (EIA, 2010). Nowadays, heat pump systems are getting more common for heating and cooling purposes. Such system extracts energy from a relatively cold source to be injected into the conditioned space in winter or alternatively, extracts energy from conditioned spaces to be injected into a relatively warm sink in summer. The temperature difference between the conditioned space and the heat source/sink is referred to as temperature lift. This temperature plays a major role in determining the coefficient of performance (COP=delivered energy/driving energy) of heat pump systems. As temperature lift drops, the performance of the heat pump rises. More specifically, extracting heat from a warmer source during the winter and injecting heat into a colder source during the summer leads to a better COP and, consequently, less energy use. The ground temperature below a certain depth is constant over the year. This depth depends on the thermal properties of the ground, but it is in range of 10-15 m. Thus, the ground is warmer than the air during wintertime and colder than the air during the summertime. Therefore, using the ground, instead of the air, as heat source or as a heat sink for the heat pump results in smaller lift temperature. This fact represents the theoretical base of GSHP. The GSHPs move heat from the ground, i.e. solar energy that is naturally stored in the ground, to heat buildings in wintertime or alternatively, to cool them in summertime. This heat transfer process is achieved by circulating a heat carrier (water or a water–antifreeze mixture) between a ground heat exchanger (GHE) and heat pump condenser (summer time) or evaporator (winter time). The GHE is a pipe (usually of plastic) buried vertically or horizontally under the ground surface. Due to its high thermal performance, the ground source heat pump (GSHP) have increasingly replaced conventional heating and cooling systems around the world. Current work emphasizes the importance of using ground source heat pumps in reaching towards the renewable energy goals of climate change mitigation, and reduced environmental impacts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IN-TECH, 2012
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-20202 (URN)2c9f9356-8991-4f0f-8aba-8b31bbe702e3 (Local ID)9789535102786 (ISBN)2c9f9356-8991-4f0f-8aba-8b31bbe702e3 (Archive number)2c9f9356-8991-4f0f-8aba-8b31bbe702e3 (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2012; 20110927 (khamoh)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Kharseh, M. & Altorkmany, L. (2012). How global warming and building envelope will change buildings energy use in central Europe (ed.). Paper presented at International Conference on Applied Energy : 16/05/2011 - 18/05/2011. Applied Energy, 97(Spec. Issue), 999-1004
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How global warming and building envelope will change buildings energy use in central Europe
2012 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 97, no Spec. Issue, p. 999-1004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The thermal performance of ground source heat pump systems (GSHP) strongly depends on ground temperature and energy demand for heating and cooling during the year. Certainly, increasing the global temperature means warmer ground. On the other hand, the thermal load of a building is influenced by thermal quality of building envelop (TQBE) and also influenced by the ambient air temperature. There is absolutely no doubt that the global temperature has increased during the last century. Over time, the buildings designs are changing. These result in changed thermal load of the buildings, ground temperature, and thereby changed the thermal performance of GSHPs. The objective of current work was to investigate the impact of TQBE under different global warming scenarios on driving energy and construction cost of GSHPs in Vienna. This was achieved by comparing the driving energy of the GSHP as well the required total length of the borehole heat exchanger for different GW scenarios and different TQBE. Under climate conditions of Vienna city study shows that improving the TQBE and increasing ambient air temperature result in reduced driving energy of GSHP. While is it not obvious for the required total borehole depth. Namely, after a certain degree of GW, increasing TQBE might result in increased required borehole depth.

National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-38524 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2012.03.023 (DOI)000307196000117 ()2-s2.0-84862335994 (Scopus ID)cf3a2749-e15a-49ac-971d-26a845c873dd (Local ID)cf3a2749-e15a-49ac-971d-26a845c873dd (Archive number)cf3a2749-e15a-49ac-971d-26a845c873dd (OAI)
Conference
International Conference on Applied Energy : 16/05/2011 - 18/05/2011
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20110702 (khamoh); Konferensartikel i tidskriftAvailable from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Kharseh, M. (2011). A New Method to Estimate the Thermal Load of Buildings. Paper presented at .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New Method to Estimate the Thermal Load of Buildings
2011 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In current work we aimed to define a new method that can be used to estimate the thermal load of buildings. The suggested method clearly expresses the heating and cooling load as a function of thermal performance of building’s shell and temperature difference between indoor and outdoor. Consequently, changes in thermal load due to improving the thermal performance of building’s shell or due to change in outdoor temperature can be easily investigated.

Keywords
Civil engineering and architecture - Building engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Byggnadsteknik
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-33876 (URN)de319c20-c954-47a3-bbdb-bc12627f2068 (Local ID)de319c20-c954-47a3-bbdb-bc12627f2068 (Archive number)de319c20-c954-47a3-bbdb-bc12627f2068 (OAI)
Note

Godkänd; 2011; 20110429 (khamoh)

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Kharseh, M. (2011). Evaluation of Thermal Response Test Data: User-friendly Program. Paper presented at .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Thermal Response Test Data: User-friendly Program
2011 (English)Other (Other academic)
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-33725 (URN)ac712240-f346-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (Local ID)ac712240-f346-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (Archive number)ac712240-f346-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note

Godkänd; 2011; 20101118 (khamoh)

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Kharseh, M., Altorkmany, L. & Nordell, B. (2011). Global warming’s impact on the performance of GSHP (ed.). Paper presented at . Renewable energy, 36(5), 1485-1491
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global warming’s impact on the performance of GSHP
2011 (English)In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 1485-1491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since heating and cooling systems of buildings consume 30e50% of the global energy consumption, increased efficiency of such systems means a considerable reduction in energy consumption. Ground source heat pumps (GSHP) are likely to play a central role in achieving this goal due to their high energy efficient performance. The efficiency of GSHP depends on the ground temperature, heating and cooling demands, and the distribution of heating and cooling over the year. However, all of these are affected by the ongoing climatic change. Consequently, global warming has direct effects on the GSHP performance.Within the framework of current study, heating and cooling demands of a reference building were calculated for different global warming scenarios in different climates i.e. cold, mild and hot climate. The prime energy required to drive the GSHP system is compared for each scenario and two configurations of ground heat exchangers. Current study shows that the ongoing climatic change has significant impact on GSHP systems.

National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-16077 (URN)10.1016/j.renene.2010.11.016 (DOI)000286999200022 ()2-s2.0-78650753054 (Scopus ID)fa8fe3d0-4cc0-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (Local ID)fa8fe3d0-4cc0-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (Archive number)fa8fe3d0-4cc0-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20100420 (khamoh)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Kharseh, M. & Altorkmany, L. (2011). How thermal quality of buildings and global warming affect ground source heat pumps system in Vienna (ed.). Paper presented at International Conference on Applied Energy : 16/05/2011 - 18/05/2011. Paper presented at International Conference on Applied Energy : 16/05/2011 - 18/05/2011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How thermal quality of buildings and global warming affect ground source heat pumps system in Vienna
2011 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The thermal performance of ground source heat pump systems (GSHP) strongly depends on ground temperature and energy demand for heating and cooling over the year. Indeed, the amount of energy lost or retained inside a building are influenced by thermal quality of building envelop (TQBE). Over time, the building design is changing to meet the increased comfort requirements. This results in changing energy demand for heating and cooling. The overall aim of current work is study the impact of climatic changes in combination with TQBE on driving energy and construction cost of GSHP. This was achieved by comparing the driving energy of the GSHP as well the required total length of the borehole heat exchanger for different GW scenarios and different TQBE. Under climate conditions of central Europe, study shows that it is not always good to built our building with high TQBE.

National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-28620 (URN)27978010-089e-11e0-b767-000ea68e967b (Local ID)27978010-089e-11e0-b767-000ea68e967b (Archive number)27978010-089e-11e0-b767-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Conference
International Conference on Applied Energy : 16/05/2011 - 18/05/2011
Note
Godkänd; 2011; 20101215 (khamoh)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Kharseh, M. (2011). Reduction of prime energy consumption by ground source heat pumps in a warmer world (ed.). (Doctoral dissertation). Paper presented at . Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduction of prime energy consumption by ground source heat pumps in a warmer world
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Much of the energy used worldwide is supplied by fossil fuels (~85 %) while renewable energy sources supply approximately 6 %. A sustainable future urgently requires worldwide efforts to reduce primary energy consumption and increase use of renewable energy sources. Heating and cooling in the industrial, commercial, and domestic sectors accounts for more than one third of the world’s total energy consumption. Consequently, the implementation of more efficient heating/cooling systems has clear potential to save both energy and the environment. However, the use of renewable energy systems for heating and cooling applications has received relatively little attention compared with other applications such as renewable electricity or biofuels for transportation. Up until now, renewable energy sources supply only around 2-3% of the annual global heating and cooling demand (excluding traditional bioenergy).Heat pump systems are becoming more common for heating and cooling purposes. Such systems extract energy from a relatively cold source to be injected into the conditioned space in winter or alternatively, extract energy from conditioned spaces to be injected into a relatively warm sink in summer. The driving energy of the heat pump strongly depends on the temperature difference between the conditioned space and the heat source/sink. More specifically, extracting heat from warmer source during the winter and injecting heat into colder sink during the summer leads to a better coefficient of performance (COP) and, consequently, less energy use.Since the ground under certain depth is warmer than the air during winter and colder during summer, using the ground as the heat source/sink of the heat pump results in better COP. Due to their high thermal performance compared to conventional heating and cooling systems, ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are increasingly being used to reduce energy consumption. Essentially GSHP systems refer to a combination of a heat pump and a system for exchanging heat from the ground. The GSHPs move heat from the ground to heat buildings and houses in the winter or alternatively, move heat from the buildings and houses to the ground to cool them in the summer. It is worth mentioning that the operating temperature of a borehole field depends on the annual mean air temperature and the ratio of heating to the cooling demand of the buildings. Hence, the ongoing global warming and improvement of the thermal quality of the building envelope have a direct impact on the performance of GSHPs.No GSHP system has yet been built in Syria despite the fact that the local conditions in many ways are more favorable than in for example Sweden, which has the world’s third biggest installed facility.In addition to emphasizing the importance of using ground source heat pumps in reaching the renewable energy goals of mitigating the climate change, the current work:• Reported the first thermal response test (TRT) that was performed in Syria that is required in order to determine the ground thermal properties, which are needed for the proper design of borehole heat;• Provided a simple method that gives the change in ground temperature as a function of the surface warming;• Showed the impact of GW in combination with the building envelope quality on the thermal performance of GSHP and, consequently, on the driving energy of GSHPs;• Introduced a method that can be implemented to improve the thermal characteristics of ground heat exchanger.In order to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the ground and the thermal resistance of the ground heat exchanger, a computer model was built, which can be used to analyze the experiment data. Furthermore, a new method that can be used to calculate the thermal load of buildings was developed and a computer model was built too.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2011
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-18209 (URN)76b63a03-267c-481e-8611-174f674a3177 (Local ID)978-91-7439-334-7 (ISBN)76b63a03-267c-481e-8611-174f674a3177 (Archive number)76b63a03-267c-481e-8611-174f674a3177 (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2011; 20110928 (khamoh); DISPUTATION Ämnesområde: Vattenteknik/Water Resources Engineering Opponent: Professor Jeff Spitler, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, U.S.A. Ordförande: Professor Bo Nordell, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Luleå tekniska universitet Tid: Fredag den 2 december 2011, kl 10.00 Plats: F1031, Luleå tekniska universitetAvailable from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Kharseh, M. & Nordell, B. (2011). Sustainable heating and cooling systems for agriculture (ed.). International journal of energy research (Print), 35(5), 415-422
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable heating and cooling systems for agriculture
2011 (English)In: International journal of energy research (Print), ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 415-422Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Space heating/cooling systems account for approximately 40% of the global energy consumption. Such systems contribute to global warming by emitting 4×1010 MWh of heat and 3×1010 tons of CO2. There is a general understanding that the way to reduce global warming is a more efficient use of energy and increased use of renewable energy in all fields of the society. Ground-coupled heating/cooling systems, which have proven to make huge contributions in reducing energy consumption in Europe and North America, is here applied for poultry industry in Syria, as an example for the Middle East. There are e.g. 13 000 chicken farms in Syria producing 172 000 tons of meat per year. This industry employs directly almost 150 000 people. The total investments in chicken farming are 130 BSP (2 B). The annual mean air temperature in Syria is 15-18°C with winter temperatures close to freezing during two months. The chickens need a temperature of 21-35°C, depending on age, and the heating of all Syrian chicken plants consume 173×103 tons of coal (1196 GWh). In the summer time, the ambient air temperature in Syria could reach above 45°C. The chicken farms have no cooling systems since conventional cooling system is too expensive. The elevated temperature inside the farms reduces the chicken growth and lots of chicken die of overheating. The ground temperature at 10 m depth is roughly equal to the annual mean air temperature. Using the ground as a heat source means a sustainable and less expensive heating of the chicken farms. During the summer, the ground is used as a source for free cooling, i.e. used directly for cooling of the plants without any cooling machines. Current study shows the design and simulated operation of a ground-coupled heating/cooling system for a typical chicken farm in Syria. Performed national potential study showed that the implementation of such ground coupled heating and cooling systems in the Syrian poultry sector would mean increased poultry production and considerable savings in money, energy, and the environment.

National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4967 (URN)10.1002/er.1699 (DOI)000288391000005 ()2-s2.0-79952662478 (Scopus ID)2f929bd0-88e1-11de-8da0-000ea68e967b (Local ID)2f929bd0-88e1-11de-8da0-000ea68e967b (Archive number)2f929bd0-88e1-11de-8da0-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2011; 20090814 (khamoh)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Kharseh, M. & Nordell, B. (2009). First thermal response test in Syria (ed.). In: (Ed.), Signhild Gehlin (Ed.), Abstract book and proceedings : Effstock 2009: 11th International conference on thermal Energy Storage for Energy Efficiency and Sustainability. Paper presented at International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage : 14/06/2009 - 17/06/2009. Stockholm: Energi- och Miljötekniska Föreningen / EMTF Förlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First thermal response test in Syria
2009 (English)In: Abstract book and proceedings : Effstock 2009: 11th International conference on thermal Energy Storage for Energy Efficiency and Sustainability / [ed] Signhild Gehlin, Stockholm: Energi- och Miljötekniska Föreningen / EMTF Förlag , 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) mean attractive heating and cooling systems. The injection/extraction of thermal energy is obtained by borehole heat exchangers (BHE). Since the GSHP operates at a relatively stable temperature, the coefficient of performance of such systems is higher than that of air source heat pumps. BHEs are drilled to a depth <300 m with a diameter of 0.10-0.15 m. The proper BHE design requires knowledge of ground thermal properties. Thermal response testing (TRT) is used primarily for in situ determination of design data for BHEs. In current study, which was the first TRT in Syria, the purpose was to determine the effective ground thermal conductivity. Measured data were evaluated by the line source model. Used method and performed evaluation are presented for a borehole drilled in clay, silt and sand. The resulting effective ground thermal conductivity was 2.011 W/m.K and the borehole thermal resistance was 0.111 K /(W/m).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Energi- och Miljötekniska Föreningen / EMTF Förlag, 2009
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-38928 (URN)d7c66dc0-8668-11de-8da0-000ea68e967b (Local ID)d7c66dc0-8668-11de-8da0-000ea68e967b (Archive number)d7c66dc0-8668-11de-8da0-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Conference
International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage : 14/06/2009 - 17/06/2009
Note
Godkänd; 2009; 20090811 (khamoh)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7930-7894

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