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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Mills, A., Reyneke, M., Pitt, L. & Campbell, C. (2015). Drawing meaning from online user discussions about brands: A study of comments in response to luxury advertisements on YouTube (ed.). In: (Ed.), Mary Conway (Ed.), The Sustainable Global Marketplace: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing Science, Coral Gables, FL USA May 24-27, 2011. Paper presented at Academy of Marketing Science. Conference : 24/05/2011 - 27/05/2011 (pp. 398). Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drawing meaning from online user discussions about brands: A study of comments in response to luxury advertisements on YouTube
2015 (English)In: The Sustainable Global Marketplace: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing Science, Coral Gables, FL USA May 24-27, 2011 / [ed] Mary Conway, Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2015, p. 398-Conference paper, Meeting abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Internet and how consumers make use of it is constantly changing. The Internet has evolved from an information retrieval source to a place of interactivity, and a place for dialogue from one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-many. Many term the Internet today “Web 2.0.” As one of many social platforms of Web 2.0, the use of video as a means of online communication is gaining increasing popularity among Internet users. Video publishing is no longer accessible solely to trained and skilled videographers; assisted by the development of inexpensive and user-friendly media software, consumers are now creating their own content. The accessibility of video publishing, combined with the network effects of video-driven social media platforms such as YouTube, is changing the advertising landscape. This paper discusses Consumer Generated Advertising (CGA), where consumers create brand messages independent of the brands themselves in order to persuade, inform or remind fellow consumers. Because of the anonymity, visibility and interactivity of online CGA, consumer dialogues and market conversations are difficult to interpret through traditional advertising research methods (surveys, ratings services, etc). However, there may be an opportunity for brand managers to capitalize on Web 2.0 to gain valuable insight into the ways consumers interact with their brands. In this exploratory study, we make use of the content analysis software Leximancer to make sense of and measure consumer feedback around conversations on CGA. We study consumer comments posted on You Tube in response to three video advertisements in order to draw meaningful trends and insights from the large volume of seemingly disorganized consumer discussion

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2015
Series
Developments in Marketing Science, ISSN 0149-7421
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-31742 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-10873-5_241 (DOI)6017effc-7606-4e75-9354-237f586fb0db (Local ID)978-3-319-10872-8 (ISBN)978-3-319-10873-5 (ISBN)6017effc-7606-4e75-9354-237f586fb0db (Archive number)6017effc-7606-4e75-9354-237f586fb0db (OAI)
Conference
Academy of Marketing Science. Conference : 24/05/2011 - 27/05/2011
Note
Godkänd; 2015; 20150116 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Reyneke, M., Sorokáčová, A. & Pitt, L. (2012). Managing brands in times of economic downturn: how do luxury brands fare? (ed.). Paper presented at . Journal of Brand Management, 19(6), 457-466
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing brands in times of economic downturn: how do luxury brands fare?
2012 (English)In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 457-466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spending in virtually every category of non-essential offerings declines during economic downturn. The recent global recession has confronted the luxury goods industry with questions of how well luxury brands do in times of economic downturn, and what kinds of strategies luxury brand managers implement in order to deal with economic asperity. In this article we address the relationship between the performance of luxury brands and the economic cycle, specifically the effect that recessions have on luxury brands, by means of an exploratory qualitative study. We evaluate the luxury goods industry as well as changes within it in recent years. We further consider luxury consumers and the effect the recent recession has had on their behavior, and outline a study of executives within the luxury goods industry designed to capture their impressions of the effects of an economic downturn on the brands they manage. The conclusions and managerial implications of the article afford managers of luxury brands some insight into strategies followed by luxury brands during the recession, as well as some interesting elements of consumer behavior during this time.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-5275 (URN)10.1057/bm.2011.53 (DOI)2-s2.0-84858685305 (Scopus ID)355d8507-4f95-43cf-9b4d-4fff1af2067e (Local ID)355d8507-4f95-43cf-9b4d-4fff1af2067e (Archive number)355d8507-4f95-43cf-9b4d-4fff1af2067e (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20110329 (migrey)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Mills, A., Reyneke, M., Pitt, L. & Campbell, C. (2011). Drawing meaning from online user discussions about brands: A study of comments in response to luxury advertisements on YouTube (ed.). In: (Ed.), Mary Conway (Ed.), The Sustainable Global Marketplace: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing Science, Coral Gables, FL USA May 24-27, 2011. Paper presented at Academy of Marketing Science. Conference : 24/05/2011 - 27/05/2011 (pp. 398). : The Academy of Marketing Science
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drawing meaning from online user discussions about brands: A study of comments in response to luxury advertisements on YouTube
2011 (English)In: The Sustainable Global Marketplace: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing Science, Coral Gables, FL USA May 24-27, 2011 / [ed] Mary Conway, The Academy of Marketing Science, 2011, p. 398-Conference paper, Meeting abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Internet and how consumers make use of it is constantly changing. The Internet has evolved from an information retrieval source to a place of interactivity, and a place for dialogue from one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-many. Many term the Internet today “Web 2.0.” As one of many social platforms of Web 2.0, the use of video as a means of online communication is gaining increasing popularity among Internet users. Video publishing is no longer accessible solely to trained and skilled videographers; assisted by the development of inexpensive and user-friendly media software, consumers are now creating their own content. The accessibility of video publishing, combined with the network effects of video-driven social media platforms such as YouTube, is changing the advertising landscape. This paper discusses Consumer Generated Advertising (CGA), where consumers create brand messages independent of the brands themselves in order to persuade, inform or remind fellow consumers. Because of the anonymity, visibility and interactivity of online CGA, consumer dialogues and market conversations are difficult to interpret through traditional advertising research methods (surveys, ratings services, etc). However, there may be an opportunity for brand managers to capitalize on Web 2.0 to gain valuable insight into the ways consumers interact with their brands. In this exploratory study, we make use of the content analysis software Leximancer to make sense of and measure consumer feedback around conversations on CGA. We study consumer comments posted on You Tube in response to three video advertisements in order to draw meaningful trends and insights from the large volume of seemingly disorganized consumer discussion

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Academy of Marketing Science, 2011
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-32375 (URN)6dd540c3-6f02-4132-84b5-790cb63556f3 (Local ID)0-939783-36-3 (ISBN)6dd540c3-6f02-4132-84b5-790cb63556f3 (Archive number)6dd540c3-6f02-4132-84b5-790cb63556f3 (OAI)
Conference
Academy of Marketing Science. Conference : 24/05/2011 - 27/05/2011
Note
Godkänd; 2011; 20110816 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Reyneke, M. (2011). In the lap of luxury: consumer conversations concerning online advertisements of luxury brands (ed.). Paper presented at . South African Journal of Business Management, 42(2), 27-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In the lap of luxury: consumer conversations concerning online advertisements of luxury brands
2011 (English)In: South African Journal of Business Management, ISSN 0378-9098, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 27-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While branding is an area that is extensively studied in the marketing literature, there is a noticeable lack of attention to the study of luxury brands, and even more so from an online perspective. In this exploratory study, we make use of the content analysis software Leximancer to comprehend the consumer feedback around conversations about luxury brand ads posted online. We study consumer comments posted on YouTube around three different luxury brands and analyse these comment in order to find meaning among the large volume of consumer discussion. We attempt to shed some light on how these conversations can be tracked and interpreted in order to gain valuable insight into the consumer?s role in advertising through discussing the ads for well known luxury brands that were chosen for this study and the subsequent reactions to them. We go on to discuss the Leximancer tool that can be used for deciphering and interpreting the consumer conversations surrounding these ads and the results of the analysis. We conclude by acknowledging the limitations of this methodology, identifying implications for managers, and suggesting avenues for future research.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4944 (URN)2f2ced51-1cf5-4c74-b5b8-3fed3efaac2a (Local ID)2f2ced51-1cf5-4c74-b5b8-3fed3efaac2a (Archive number)2f2ced51-1cf5-4c74-b5b8-3fed3efaac2a (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20110329 (migrey)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Reyneke, M. (2011). Luxury as the opposite of vulgarity: a trio of perspectives on luxury brands (ed.). (Doctoral dissertation). Paper presented at . Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Luxury as the opposite of vulgarity: a trio of perspectives on luxury brands
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis, entitled “Luxury as the opposite of vulgarity: A trio of perspectives on luxury brands” considers luxury brands in a trio of contemporary contexts. Despite the academic research surrounding luxury brands being limited, the existent research most often studies luxury brands in a traditional retail context. That is, luxury is viewed from a perspective where the products are sold in luxury retail stores. However, the landscape that these brands function within has changed significantly in the last decade as a result of the rise in Internet usage, the ever increasing effect of social media on consumer behaviour, and the influence of the recent global recession. This study considers how consumers behave and how luxury brand managers act in a trio of contemporary contexts regarding luxury brands; namely gift giving, economic downturns and social media. Through this thesis, the researcher considers the behaviour of luxury consumers in these three contexts, and suggests ways for the managers of these luxury brands to successfully adjust to the changing environment in which these brands function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2011
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-17084 (URN)17eda459-af2c-4c0a-9bc3-6ac0d68b84cd (Local ID)978-91-7439-242-5 (ISBN)17eda459-af2c-4c0a-9bc3-6ac0d68b84cd (Archive number)17eda459-af2c-4c0a-9bc3-6ac0d68b84cd (OAI)
Note
Godkänd; 2011; 20110330 (migrey); DISPUTATION Ämnesområde: Industriell marknadsföring Opponent: Associate Professor Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Griffith University, Australia Ordförande: Universitetslektor Anne Engström, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Luleå tekniska universitet Tid: Tisdag den 7 juni 2011, kl. 15.30 Plats: A109Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Reyneke, M., Berthon, P. R., Pitt, L. F. & Parent, M. (2011). Luxury wine brands as gifts: onthological and aesthetic perspectives (ed.). International Journal of Wine Business Research, 23(3), 258-270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Luxury wine brands as gifts: onthological and aesthetic perspectives
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Wine Business Research, ISSN 1751-1062, E-ISSN 1751-1070, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 258-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to address the issues of luxury gift giving and the giving of luxury wines as gifts from a conceptual perspective. Design/methodology/approach – The article considers the OA (aesthetic and ontology) model as proposed by Berthon et al. that permits the integration of various conceptualisations of different authors in the area of luxury branding. The model offers a typology of luxury brands that draws on Heidegger's theory of arts and Whitehead's process philosophy. This means that one can differentiate luxury brands along two dimensions: aesthetics and ontology. Findings – The paper contends that the four modes as set out in the AO model of Berthon et al. can be used as a typology of luxury wines, from both gift giving, and gift receiving, perspectives. Practical implications – Luxury wine marketers can make use of the proposed typology to target wine gift givers effectively, by understanding where on the proposed matrix both the giver and the receiver are positioned. The four modes that emerge can be seen as different target markets, with different motivations and different behaviors with regard to luxury wines as gifts. Originality/value – By applying the OA model to luxury wines and specifically to the giving and receiving of luxury wines, this paper offers wine marketers the insight to formulate different marketing mix strategies based on the different target markets that emerge from the proposed model.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-16019 (URN)10.1108/17511061111163078 (DOI)2-s2.0-84886796493 (Scopus ID)f99e8960-b9b5-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (Local ID)f99e8960-b9b5-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (Archive number)f99e8960-b9b5-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2011; 20100906 (ysko)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Reyneke, M., Pitt, L. & Berthon, P. R. (2011). Luxury wine brands visibility in social media: an exploratory study (ed.). Paper presented at . International Journal of Wine Business Research, 23(1), 21-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Luxury wine brands visibility in social media: an exploratory study
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Wine Business Research, ISSN 1751-1062, E-ISSN 1751-1070, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to address the visibility of luxury wine brands, in particular the Bordeaux first growth brands in social media. Design/methodology/approach – The paper uses data from howsociable.com to portray similar luxury wine brands in multi-dimensional space. To identify the associations between the brands and the social media visibility indicators, the paper uses correspondence analysis. Findings – The findings of the paper show that some of the brands considered did not, at the time the data were gathered, have a clearly defined social media strategy. Practical implications – The indication is that there are opportunities for luxury wine brand managers to use social media as a tool in their marketing strategies; also some threats may exist to these brands should they take a laissez faire approach to social media, particularly when social media are becoming as influential, if not more so than conventional media. Originality/value – Brands can take directions in social media today that would have been unlikely if not impossible five years ago. While brand managers may not fully be able to control the destinies of these brands, this paper suggests that the approaches followed in this particular research will present brand managers with a tool that will assist them in directing conversations that occur around their brands.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3744 (URN)10.1108/17511061111121380 (DOI)2-s2.0-84986076995 (Scopus ID)19322cdc-a394-484a-84c7-04f9e67e6f34 (Local ID)19322cdc-a394-484a-84c7-04f9e67e6f34 (Archive number)19322cdc-a394-484a-84c7-04f9e67e6f34 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20110329 (migrey)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1157-826

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