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Pitt, Leyland
Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Mills, A., Reyneke, M., Pitt, L. & Campbell, C. (2015). Drawing meaning from online user discussions about brands: A study of comments in response to luxury advertisements on YouTube (ed.). In: (Ed.), Mary Conway (Ed.), The Sustainable Global Marketplace: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing Science, Coral Gables, FL USA May 24-27, 2011. Paper presented at Academy of Marketing Science. Conference : 24/05/2011 - 27/05/2011 (pp. 398). Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drawing meaning from online user discussions about brands: A study of comments in response to luxury advertisements on YouTube
2015 (English)In: The Sustainable Global Marketplace: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing Science, Coral Gables, FL USA May 24-27, 2011 / [ed] Mary Conway, Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2015, p. 398-Conference paper, Meeting abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Internet and how consumers make use of it is constantly changing. The Internet has evolved from an information retrieval source to a place of interactivity, and a place for dialogue from one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-many. Many term the Internet today “Web 2.0.” As one of many social platforms of Web 2.0, the use of video as a means of online communication is gaining increasing popularity among Internet users. Video publishing is no longer accessible solely to trained and skilled videographers; assisted by the development of inexpensive and user-friendly media software, consumers are now creating their own content. The accessibility of video publishing, combined with the network effects of video-driven social media platforms such as YouTube, is changing the advertising landscape. This paper discusses Consumer Generated Advertising (CGA), where consumers create brand messages independent of the brands themselves in order to persuade, inform or remind fellow consumers. Because of the anonymity, visibility and interactivity of online CGA, consumer dialogues and market conversations are difficult to interpret through traditional advertising research methods (surveys, ratings services, etc). However, there may be an opportunity for brand managers to capitalize on Web 2.0 to gain valuable insight into the ways consumers interact with their brands. In this exploratory study, we make use of the content analysis software Leximancer to make sense of and measure consumer feedback around conversations on CGA. We study consumer comments posted on You Tube in response to three video advertisements in order to draw meaningful trends and insights from the large volume of seemingly disorganized consumer discussion

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2015
Series
Developments in Marketing Science, ISSN 0149-7421
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-31742 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-10873-5_241 (DOI)6017effc-7606-4e75-9354-237f586fb0db (Local ID)978-3-319-10872-8 (ISBN)978-3-319-10873-5 (ISBN)6017effc-7606-4e75-9354-237f586fb0db (Archive number)6017effc-7606-4e75-9354-237f586fb0db (OAI)
Conference
Academy of Marketing Science. Conference : 24/05/2011 - 27/05/2011
Note
Godkänd; 2015; 20150116 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Reyneke, M., Sorokáčová, A. & Pitt, L. (2012). Managing brands in times of economic downturn: how do luxury brands fare? (ed.). Paper presented at . Journal of Brand Management, 19(6), 457-466
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing brands in times of economic downturn: how do luxury brands fare?
2012 (English)In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 457-466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spending in virtually every category of non-essential offerings declines during economic downturn. The recent global recession has confronted the luxury goods industry with questions of how well luxury brands do in times of economic downturn, and what kinds of strategies luxury brand managers implement in order to deal with economic asperity. In this article we address the relationship between the performance of luxury brands and the economic cycle, specifically the effect that recessions have on luxury brands, by means of an exploratory qualitative study. We evaluate the luxury goods industry as well as changes within it in recent years. We further consider luxury consumers and the effect the recent recession has had on their behavior, and outline a study of executives within the luxury goods industry designed to capture their impressions of the effects of an economic downturn on the brands they manage. The conclusions and managerial implications of the article afford managers of luxury brands some insight into strategies followed by luxury brands during the recession, as well as some interesting elements of consumer behavior during this time.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-5275 (URN)10.1057/bm.2011.53 (DOI)2-s2.0-84858685305 (Scopus ID)355d8507-4f95-43cf-9b4d-4fff1af2067e (Local ID)355d8507-4f95-43cf-9b4d-4fff1af2067e (Archive number)355d8507-4f95-43cf-9b4d-4fff1af2067e (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20110329 (migrey)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Mills, A. J., Pitt, L. & Sattari, S. (2012). Reading between the vines: analyzing the readability of consumer brand wine web sites (ed.). Paper presented at . International Journal of Wine Business Research, 24(3), 169-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading between the vines: analyzing the readability of consumer brand wine web sites
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Wine Business Research, ISSN 1751-1062, E-ISSN 1751-1070, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 169-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many audiences might view wine brand web sites as complex or unapproachable. Wine drinking is no longer a pastime of the affluent and elite; rather, it is increasingly popular among younger consumer groups and those from broader socio-economic backgrounds. In order to communicate effectively with newer consumer demographics, wine brand web sites must first and foremost be understandable and readable. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this issue, aiming to answer the question of whether the web sites of popular wine brands are readable or not. Design/methodology/approach – To investigate the readability of consumer brand wine web sites, web site copy from the 20 most popular wine brands in the USA was calculated across multiple readability indices employing content analysis. Findings – The findings suggest that, while certain target demographics may be assumed by grouping wine brand web sites based on readability measures, there are marked differences in readability across wine web sites of a similar nature that only serves to reinforce consumer confusion, rather than help remove it. Originality/value – There is scant literature on readability in the wine business literature in general, and with regard to the readability of wine web sites in particular. The research highlights the need for those who communicate with a broad audience of wine consumers to give attention to web site content, and readability in particular. This is for two reasons: less sophisticated consumers will not respond to wine marketing messages they cannot understand, and more sophisticated wine drinkers will react more positively to messages that are clear and well-written. Readability is equally important for these more sophisticated consumers.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4497 (URN)10.1108/17511061211259170 (DOI)2-s2.0-84986084395 (Scopus ID)26f926d7-db0c-47f1-a821-596cae03fba7 (Local ID)26f926d7-db0c-47f1-a821-596cae03fba7 (Archive number)26f926d7-db0c-47f1-a821-596cae03fba7 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120813 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Mills, A., Reyneke, M., Pitt, L. & Campbell, C. (2011). Drawing meaning from online user discussions about brands: A study of comments in response to luxury advertisements on YouTube (ed.). In: (Ed.), Mary Conway (Ed.), The Sustainable Global Marketplace: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing Science, Coral Gables, FL USA May 24-27, 2011. Paper presented at Academy of Marketing Science. Conference : 24/05/2011 - 27/05/2011 (pp. 398). : The Academy of Marketing Science
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drawing meaning from online user discussions about brands: A study of comments in response to luxury advertisements on YouTube
2011 (English)In: The Sustainable Global Marketplace: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing Science, Coral Gables, FL USA May 24-27, 2011 / [ed] Mary Conway, The Academy of Marketing Science, 2011, p. 398-Conference paper, Meeting abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Internet and how consumers make use of it is constantly changing. The Internet has evolved from an information retrieval source to a place of interactivity, and a place for dialogue from one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-many. Many term the Internet today “Web 2.0.” As one of many social platforms of Web 2.0, the use of video as a means of online communication is gaining increasing popularity among Internet users. Video publishing is no longer accessible solely to trained and skilled videographers; assisted by the development of inexpensive and user-friendly media software, consumers are now creating their own content. The accessibility of video publishing, combined with the network effects of video-driven social media platforms such as YouTube, is changing the advertising landscape. This paper discusses Consumer Generated Advertising (CGA), where consumers create brand messages independent of the brands themselves in order to persuade, inform or remind fellow consumers. Because of the anonymity, visibility and interactivity of online CGA, consumer dialogues and market conversations are difficult to interpret through traditional advertising research methods (surveys, ratings services, etc). However, there may be an opportunity for brand managers to capitalize on Web 2.0 to gain valuable insight into the ways consumers interact with their brands. In this exploratory study, we make use of the content analysis software Leximancer to make sense of and measure consumer feedback around conversations on CGA. We study consumer comments posted on You Tube in response to three video advertisements in order to draw meaningful trends and insights from the large volume of seemingly disorganized consumer discussion

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Academy of Marketing Science, 2011
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-32375 (URN)6dd540c3-6f02-4132-84b5-790cb63556f3 (Local ID)0-939783-36-3 (ISBN)6dd540c3-6f02-4132-84b5-790cb63556f3 (Archive number)6dd540c3-6f02-4132-84b5-790cb63556f3 (OAI)
Conference
Academy of Marketing Science. Conference : 24/05/2011 - 27/05/2011
Note
Godkänd; 2011; 20110816 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved
Chan, A., Pitt, L. & Mills, A. (2011). How readable are environmental policy statements?: an exploratory study within the IT industry (ed.). Corporate Ownership & Control, 8(3), 258-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How readable are environmental policy statements?: an exploratory study within the IT industry
2011 (English)In: Corporate Ownership & Control, ISSN 1727-9232, E-ISSN 1810-3057, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 258-267Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental policy statements are nowadays fairly ubiquitous, particularly among large organizations. Environmental policy statements continue to be seen as an important element in the sustainability initiatives of organizations. However, if they are to have a chance of achieving the desired positive outcomes that those in their favor highlight, they must first be readable and comprehensible to the targeted stakeholders. To investigate the readability of environmental policy statements of IT companies, the individual environmental policy statements were collected of the IT companies within the 2009 Greenfactor study. A readability calculation tool was then employed to assess the readability of each of these environmental policystatements. Results are reported, and the implications are considered, while limitations are noted and directions for future research are identified.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9571 (URN)8385c17a-fbae-4eb6-b857-245badd7cfc8 (Local ID)8385c17a-fbae-4eb6-b857-245badd7cfc8 (Archive number)8385c17a-fbae-4eb6-b857-245badd7cfc8 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2011; 20110328 (antcha)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Sattari, S., Pitt, L. & Caruana, A. (2011). How readable are mission statements?: An exploratory study (ed.). Paper presented at . Corporate Communications. An International Journal, 16(4), 282-292
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How readable are mission statements?: An exploratory study
2011 (English)In: Corporate Communications. An International Journal, ISSN 1356-3289, E-ISSN 1758-6046, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 282-292Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – Mission statements are fairly ubiquitous, particularly among large organizations. However, if they are to have a chance of achieving the desired positive outcomes, they must first be readable and comprehensible to the targeted stakeholders. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this issue, to answer the question of whether the mission statements of large companies are readable or not. Design/methodology/approach – Content analysis and appropriate scores were employed to investigate the readability of the mission statements collected from a random sample of 100 firms in the Fortune 500 annual rankings. Findings – The results indicate that on average, the mission statements of the studied companies are not that readable, and that in the case of many of them, the mission statements assume the readings skills of a university graduate. Research limitations/implications – The results of this paper suggest that if the target audience of a mission statement is broad, and includes stakeholders such as customers and lower level employees, then firms would do well to test the readability of their mission statements, and revise them where necessary. Mission statements are not the only tools that organizations use to communicate with stakeholder. This encourages future research on readability analysis of other communication tools in firms. A larger sample of companies and other approaches to measure readability can be included in future research. Originality/value – This paper adds to the related literature, as the level of readability of mission statements has received limited attention in the past.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9302 (URN)10.1108/13563281111186931 (DOI)2-s2.0-80054841971 (Scopus ID)7e4d2d96-f00c-4fed-9e0a-26efc75b27c7 (Local ID)7e4d2d96-f00c-4fed-9e0a-26efc75b27c7 (Archive number)7e4d2d96-f00c-4fed-9e0a-26efc75b27c7 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20111101 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Pitt, L., Parent, M., Junglas, I., Chan, A. & Spyropoulou, S. (2011). Integrating the smartphone into a sound environmental information systems strategy: principles, practices and a research agenda (ed.). Journal of strategic information systems, 20(1), 27-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating the smartphone into a sound environmental information systems strategy: principles, practices and a research agenda
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2011 (English)In: Journal of strategic information systems, ISSN 0963-8687, E-ISSN 1873-1198, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 27-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Smartphones are both green technologies and an integral parts of green information systems that are beginning to make serious contributions toward a sustainable environment. We trace the rise of the smartphone, with particular attention given to the iPhone and its many applications. The fundamental differences between smartphone-based and more common Internet applications, and how these might enhance sustainable strategies for organizations with a green agenda are highlighted. U-Commerce is suggested as a theoretical framework that best explains this, and the four dimension of U-Commerce are employed to illustrate how innovative organizations are using the unique characteristics of smartphones to pursue environmentally sound strategies. A process that might be followed for indentifying applications for sustainable issues, making sure that the applications take advantages of a smartphone's unique features, and that contribute to sustainability by using fewer resources, protecting resources, and improving our use of current resources. The paper concludes by identifying a research agenda for information systems scholars to pursue studying the use of smartphones in search of a sustainable information technology agenda.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11467 (URN)10.1016/j.jsis.2010.09.005 (DOI)000289700500003 ()2-s2.0-79952618367 (Scopus ID)a7101b70-e325-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (Local ID)a7101b70-e325-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (Archive number)a7101b70-e325-11df-8b36-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2011; 20101029 (ysko)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Reyneke, M., Pitt, L. & Berthon, P. R. (2011). Luxury wine brands visibility in social media: an exploratory study (ed.). Paper presented at . International Journal of Wine Business Research, 23(1), 21-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Luxury wine brands visibility in social media: an exploratory study
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Wine Business Research, ISSN 1751-1062, E-ISSN 1751-1070, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to address the visibility of luxury wine brands, in particular the Bordeaux first growth brands in social media. Design/methodology/approach – The paper uses data from howsociable.com to portray similar luxury wine brands in multi-dimensional space. To identify the associations between the brands and the social media visibility indicators, the paper uses correspondence analysis. Findings – The findings of the paper show that some of the brands considered did not, at the time the data were gathered, have a clearly defined social media strategy. Practical implications – The indication is that there are opportunities for luxury wine brand managers to use social media as a tool in their marketing strategies; also some threats may exist to these brands should they take a laissez faire approach to social media, particularly when social media are becoming as influential, if not more so than conventional media. Originality/value – Brands can take directions in social media today that would have been unlikely if not impossible five years ago. While brand managers may not fully be able to control the destinies of these brands, this paper suggests that the approaches followed in this particular research will present brand managers with a tool that will assist them in directing conversations that occur around their brands.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3744 (URN)10.1108/17511061111121380 (DOI)2-s2.0-84986076995 (Scopus ID)19322cdc-a394-484a-84c7-04f9e67e6f34 (Local ID)19322cdc-a394-484a-84c7-04f9e67e6f34 (Archive number)19322cdc-a394-484a-84c7-04f9e67e6f34 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20110329 (migrey)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Steyn, P., Pitt, L., Strasheim, A., Boshoff, C. & Abratt, R. (2010). A cross-cultural study of the perceived benefits of a retailer loyalty scheme in Asia (ed.). Paper presented at . Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 17(5), 355-373
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cross-cultural study of the perceived benefits of a retailer loyalty scheme in Asia
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2010 (English)In: Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, ISSN 0969-6989, E-ISSN 1873-1384, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 355-373Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to explore loyalty, loyalty schemes, and loyalty cards, as well as the internationalisation of loyalty schemes. We focus on loyalty schemes in Asia to define the primary objective of our study: to assess the impact of perceived benefits on the feelings of participants of a specific retailer's loyalty scheme, as well as customer loyalty towards the retailer. A literature review of loyalty schemes and loyalty cards is undertaken as well as the internationalisation of these cards. A survey was conducted in five Asian countries in which Toys'R'Us operates, namely Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Thailand. Data was collected among members of the Toys'R'Us Star Card loyalty programme. Structural equation modelling was used to build a model that can be used to explain the simultaneous structural relations between perceived benefits, emotional feelings, and loyalty behaviours. Invariance testing was applied in order to test whether the model holds across the five countries. Our findings suggest that perceived benefits have a weak direct effect on loyalty behaviours. However, perceived benefits have a much stronger effect on feelings, which in turn have a strong effect on loyalty behaviours. We also found subtle differences between the countries in the study, which could either be attributed to cultural differences, to marketing practices, or to both, which can only be ascertained through further research.

Keywords
Business / Economics - Business studies, Ekonomi - Företagsekonomi
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11524 (URN)10.1016/j.jretconser.2010.03.017 (DOI)2-s2.0-77955154230 (Scopus ID)a8666f50-53ac-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (Local ID)a8666f50-53ac-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (Archive number)a8666f50-53ac-11df-a0f4-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2010; 20100429 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Berthon, P., Pitt, L., Halvorson, W., Ewing, M. & Crittenden, V. L. (2010). Advocating avatars: the salesperson in second life (ed.). Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management, 30(3), 195-208
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advocating avatars: the salesperson in second life
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2010 (English)In: Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management, ISSN 0885-3134, E-ISSN 1557-7813, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 195-208Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactive digital media are revolutionizing the marketing landscape. The virtual world is a dominant player in this new panorama, with exchanges in the virtual marketplace approaching $2 billion annually. While virtual, like real world, exchanges require buyers and sellers, there is little or no understanding of this disembodied sales process. The current study seeks to address this gap in knowledge by employing an ethnographic methodology in which researchers incarnate in Second Life to explore the personal selling process. Specifically, the various notions of the "self" that constitute the avatar salesperson are explored. Findings from this exploratory study suggest a relationship between the nature of the self and the type of exchange. From this, a conceptual model for the study of the virtual selling self is presented, propositions developed, and managerial implications for the virtual sales force suggested. © 2010 PSE National Educational Foundation

Keywords
Business / Economics - Business studies, Ekonomi - Företagsekonomi
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4302 (URN)10.2753/PSS0885-3134300301 (DOI)2-s2.0-77954548942 (Scopus ID)23c4ea40-98be-11df-8806-000ea68e967b (Local ID)23c4ea40-98be-11df-8806-000ea68e967b (Archive number)23c4ea40-98be-11df-8806-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2010; 20100726 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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