Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Halim, A. & Brune, J. (2019). Do Refuge Chambers Represent a Good Strategy to Manage Emergencies in Underground Coal Mines?. Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration, 36(6), 1191-1199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do Refuge Chambers Represent a Good Strategy to Manage Emergencies in Underground Coal Mines?
2019 (English)In: Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration, ISSN 2524-3462, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 1191-1199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The 2006 Sago, Darby, and Aracoma mine disasters in the United States (US) forced the US government to implement the 2006MINER Act and additional regulations that require all US underground coal mines to install and maintain refuge chambers tomanage entrapment emergencies, in particular, fires and explosions. However, there is a debate on whether barricading in refugechambers is a good strategy to survive such emergencies. Australian coal mines are not required to use refuge chambers and,instead, have adopted a strategy that focuses on instructing and training miners to self-escape to the surface. This paper analyzesmerits and problems of using refuge chambers and self-escape to the surface to manage emergencies in fires or explosions in anunderground coal mine. The authors found that the use of refuge chambers may not be the best strategy during extensive fires orwhen multiple explosions happen. In these situations, mine rescuers are unlikely able to extract miners who are sheltered inchambers and conversely, self-escape may save more lives than sheltering. Chances for successful self-escape are furtherimproved by regular, externally assessed training such as Level 1 Emergency Exercises required in the Australian State of Queensland. These exercises put pressure on mine operators to ensure and maintain the effectiveness of their emergencymanagement system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Refuge chamber, Mine emergency, Mine fire, Underground coal mines
National Category
Mineral and Mine Engineering Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75027 (URN)10.1007/s42461-019-0100-8 (DOI)000501024800015 ()
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-12-02 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-06-26 Created: 2019-06-26 Last updated: 2019-12-20Bibliographically approved
Halim, A., Bolsöy, T. & Klemo, S. (2019). The Nordic Ventilation System: An Overview. In: Ali Madiseh, Agus Sasmito, Ferri Hassani, Jozef Stachulak (Ed.), Proceedings of the 17th North American Mine Ventilation Symposium: . Paper presented at 17th North American Mine Ventilation Symposium, Montréal, Canada, April 28 to May 1, 2019. (pp. 247-257). Westmount, Quebec
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Nordic Ventilation System: An Overview
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 17th North American Mine Ventilation Symposium / [ed] Ali Madiseh, Agus Sasmito, Ferri Hassani, Jozef Stachulak, Westmount, Quebec, 2019, p. 247-257Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the ventilation system used in underground hard rock mines in Sweden and Finland, which is very different than the system used in other major mining countries such as Australia, Canada, South Africa, and USA. The system utilizes auxiliary fans with Variable Speed Drive (VSD) to distribute primary airflow to working levels instead of regulators that are commonly used in other countries. Descriptions about Ventilation on Demand (VOD) in this system and ventilation regulations in Sweden and Finland are presented in this paper. This paper also quantifies a comparison between the Nordic and the system used in other countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Westmount, Quebec: , 2019
Keywords
VOD, auxiliary fan, VSD, regulation
National Category
Mineral and Mine Engineering
Research subject
Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-74066 (URN)978-1-926872-46-9 (ISBN)
Conference
17th North American Mine Ventilation Symposium, Montréal, Canada, April 28 to May 1, 2019.
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-06-20
Halim, A. (2017). Refuge chambers in underground coal mines: Do they represent a good strategy to manage emergencies?. Mining Report Glückauf, 153(4), 334-340
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Refuge chambers in underground coal mines: Do they represent a good strategy to manage emergencies?
2017 (English)In: Mining Report Glückauf, ISSN 2195-6529, Vol. 153, no 4, p. 334-340Article in journal, Editorial material (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

The 2006 Sago, Darby, and Aracoma mine disasters in the United States (US) forced the US government to implement legislation (MINER Act) that, among other measures, requires all US underground coal mines to install and maintain refuge chambers to manage emergencies in fires or explosions. However, there is still a debate on whether this is a good strategy. Australian coal mines adopt a strategy that focuses on instructing mine workers to self-escape to the surface. They are not required to use refuge chambers by Australian mine safety legislation. This paper discusses these two strategies and analyse their merits and problems.

Abstract [de]

Infolge der Minenunglücke von Sago, Darby und Aracoma in den USA im Jahr 2006 sah sich die US-Regierung veranlasst, u. a. auch die Bereitstellung von Fluchtkammern in allen untertägigen Kohlebergwerken der USA durch rechtliche Vorgaben (MINER Act) vorzuschreiben. Diese sollen für den Fall eines Brands und bei Explosionsgefahr den Bergleuten Schutz bieten. Allerdings ist die Frage, ob der Einsatz von Fluchtkammern in der Kohle sinn-voll ist, weiterhin nicht abschließend geklärt. In australischen Bergwerken etwa ist ihr Einsatz nicht zwingend vorgeschrieben. Bergleute werden dort vielmehr auf den Fall einer notwendigen Selbstrettung nach Übertage vorbereitet. In diesem Artikel wer-den die beiden Strategien im Einzelnen diskutiert und ihre Vorzü-ge und Nachteile gegenübergestel

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gesamtverband Steinkohle e.V., 2017
Keywords
Emergency, Refuge Chambers, Notfall, Fluchtkammern
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65228 (URN)
Note

The paper is published in both English and German.

Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Halim, A. (2017). Ventilation requirements for diesel equipment in underground mines: Are we using the correct values?. In: Jürgen F. Brune (Ed.), 16th North American Mine Ventilation Symposium: . Paper presented at 16th North American Mine Ventilation Symposium, Golden, Colorado, June 17-22 2017.. Golden, Colorado, USA: Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ventilation requirements for diesel equipment in underground mines: Are we using the correct values?
2017 (English)In: 16th North American Mine Ventilation Symposium / [ed] Jürgen F. Brune, Golden, Colorado, USA: Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration , 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Ventilation is the primary means of diluting atmospheric contaminants in underground mines. The majority of equipment in underground hard rock mines are diesel powered vehicles, which produce toxic gases such as Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx), as well as carcinogenic Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM). The airflow quantity for an underground mine is usually based on the engine power of diesel vehicles used in the mine, multiplied by unit airflow requirement, such as 0.05 to 0.06 cubic metre per second per kilowatt engine power (m3/s per kW) used in Australia or 0.047 to 0.092 m3/s per kW used in Canada. These unit airflow requirements are stated in local mining Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S) regulations.

However, the origin of these unit requirements is not clear, i.e. whether they are derived from scientific studies or are empirically based. Due to this, it is impossible to ensure that the values stated in the regulations are sufficient to dilute contaminants emitted by diesel equipment. This paper traces the history of these requirements based on literature review and online interviews with fellow underground ventilation practitioners and academics to find the origin of these requirements. A review of the relevance of these requirements in today’s situation is also outlined in this paper.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Golden, Colorado, USA: Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration, 2017
Keywords
Ventilation, Diesel, Underground Mines
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65229 (URN)978-0-692-86968-0 (ISBN)
Conference
16th North American Mine Ventilation Symposium, Golden, Colorado, June 17-22 2017.
Available from: 2017-08-21 Created: 2017-08-21 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Lee, K. & Halim, A. (2014). A Comparison of Methods to Create the Initial Void for Longhole Open Stoping Blasting (ed.). Paper presented at . Mining Education Australia (MEA) Journal of Research Projects Review, 3(1), 27-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Comparison of Methods to Create the Initial Void for Longhole Open Stoping Blasting
2014 (English)In: Mining Education Australia (MEA) Journal of Research Projects Review, ISSN 2203-529X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study is based on confidential case studies collected from a Western Australian gold mine, known from here on in as ‘Mine X’. The primary mining method used at Mine X is longhole retreat open stoping with paste backfill. The main objective of this research project is to investigate which method/s is the most appropriate to develop the initial void for stope blasting at Mine X.Two methods were investigated during this research; conventional longhole rising and slashing against paste. Rising is a very common method, used frequently at Mine X as well as in the broader mining industry as determined through a literature review. Because of the common use of rising, it was expected to be a more reliable option resulting in a higher success rate. Slashing against paste, however, is a new method to the industry and not well documented, but was trialled as a possible cheaper option. These two methods were compared in terms of: success rate; drill and blast costs; limitations for their use; and benefits derived from combining the two methods.The analysis of the case studies revealed several key points. Firstly, the success rate estimated by comparing stope design geometry and final surveyed shape showed that both methods achieved the same success rate of 78 per cent. The cost analysis determined that the average rise required more than double the costs per tonne of rock than slashing against paste. Slashing against paste was found to be a much more restrictive option, requiring new stopes to be situated next to paste filled stopes of specific dimensions. Rising does not have these restrictions; however, more often required slot drives to be developed prior to stoping than slashing against paste. Combining the two methods proved to be a beneficial option having the advantages of both methods. Overall this study recommends, for Mine X, the use of slashing against paste over rising in situations where slashing against paste is permitted. All other situations should consider the use of rising or a combination of rising and slashing against paste.

Keywords
Underground mines, blasting, Civil engineering and architecture - Geoengineering and mining engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Geoteknik och gruvteknik
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10102 (URN)8d97b98b-64ea-44b9-a6b0-125f5c4f0530 (Local ID)8d97b98b-64ea-44b9-a6b0-125f5c4f0530 (Archive number)8d97b98b-64ea-44b9-a6b0-125f5c4f0530 (OAI)
Note
Upprättat; 2014; 20140919 (adrhal)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Yiu, B. & Halim, A. (2014). Selection of Haulage Fleet at Daisy Milano Gold Mine (ed.). Paper presented at . Mining Education Australia (MEA) Journal of Research Projects Review, 3(1), 69-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selection of Haulage Fleet at Daisy Milano Gold Mine
2014 (English)In: Mining Education Australia (MEA) Journal of Research Projects Review, ISSN 2203-529X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the underground mining industry, one of the long-term operational issues involves longer haulage routes as the mine gets deeper with the life of mine. This longer travel route has a great impact on the productivity and cost of the operation. Choosing the best haulage fleet will result in improved productivity and lower cost per tonne of material moved. For this reason, it has motivated Daisy Milano Gold Mine, owned by Silver Lake Resources, to analyse their current Toro 50 Plus trucks against the Atlas Copco MT5010 truck. During a three month trial of both haulage options, trucking parameters were collected from a specifically designed trucking plod.This research used a time motion study to perform productivity calculations and cost analysis of the two haulage options.Based on the assumptions made in this research, the conclusion is that the Atlas Copco MT5010 should be utilised as the preferred truck option at Daisy Milano. The Atlas Copco MT5010 has a higher average productivity of 254 tkm/hr tonnes kilometre per hour) compared to the Toro 50 Plus with an average productivity of 160 tkm/hr. In terms of cost ($ per tkm) the MT5010 is the cheaper option by over 35 per cent when compared to the Toro 50 Plus ($0.85 versus $1.31).

Keywords
Underground mines, Haulage, Civil engineering and architecture - Geoengineering and mining engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Geoteknik och gruvteknik
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10605 (URN)96ead42b-6718-4dbc-ab71-dd7cf8d309bc (Local ID)96ead42b-6718-4dbc-ab71-dd7cf8d309bc (Archive number)96ead42b-6718-4dbc-ab71-dd7cf8d309bc (OAI)
Note
Upprättat; 2014; 20140919 (adrhal)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Halim, A. (2013). Ventilation circuit for large and gassy longwall panels: an Australian perspective (ed.). Paper presented at . Mining Technology, 122(4), 235-242
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ventilation circuit for large and gassy longwall panels: an Australian perspective
2013 (English)In: Mining Technology, ISSN 1474-9009, E-ISSN 1743-2863, Vol. 122, no 4, p. 235-242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current trend in Australian longwall mines is to increase panel dimensions and production rate, and mining in gassy regions. However, this trend poses a challenge to provide adequate ventilation to manage gas emissions. While the traditional two heading gateroad bleederless U ventilation circuit, which is the most commonly used circuit in Australia, is no longer suitable due to its low volumetric capacity, a few mines manage to overcome this problem by employing a three heading gateroad ventilation circuit. However, this circuit requires significant additional development, which makes it not popular in Australian coal mines. The aim of this paper is to review the suitability of two heading and three heading gateroad traditional bleederless U ventilation circuits for a large longwall panel mining in gassy conditions. It was found that significant predrainage of the thickest roof seam is required in order to make the two heading gateroad circuit feasible in large and gassy longwall panels.

Keywords
Ventilation, Longwall, Gas, Civil engineering and architecture - Geoengineering and mining engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Geoteknik och gruvteknik
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Future mining (AERI); Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-15388 (URN)10.1179/1743286313Y.0000000043 (DOI)ee45d7ec-78d1-4477-ac68-9719a1aed093 (Local ID)ee45d7ec-78d1-4477-ac68-9719a1aed093 (Archive number)ee45d7ec-78d1-4477-ac68-9719a1aed093 (OAI)
Note
Upprättat; 2013; 20160310 (adrhal)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Halim, A. & Kerai, M. (2013). Ventilation Requirement for ‘Electric’ Underground Hard Rock Mines: A Conceptual Study (ed.). In: (Ed.), Duncan Chalmers (Ed.), The Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2013: 1-3 July 2013, Adelaide, South Australia ; [proceedings]. Paper presented at Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2013 : 01/07/2013 - 03/07/2013 (pp. 215-220). Carlton, Vic: The Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ventilation Requirement for ‘Electric’ Underground Hard Rock Mines: A Conceptual Study
2013 (English)In: The Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2013: 1-3 July 2013, Adelaide, South Australia ; [proceedings] / [ed] Duncan Chalmers, Carlton, Vic: The Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy , 2013, p. 215-220Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The electric power price in mining countries such as Australia and South Africa has increased significantly in the past fi ve years and is likely to continue to increase in the foreseeable future. This can make a mine uneconomic to operate. Replacing diesel vehicles with electric ones can reduce ventilation power consumption, which can comprise up to 40 per cent of total mine power consumption. However, no such airflow requirement for electric vehicles is stated in any mining regulations in the world. In this paper, the authors investigate the ventilation requirement of an electric vehicle operating in an underground hard rock mine. Quantification of atmospheric contaminant emitted by an electric vehicle was done at Rio Tinto’s Northparkes mine, followed by thermodynamic and ventilation network simulations using Ventsim Visual software.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Carlton, Vic: The Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 2013
Keywords
Ventilation, Electric, Underground mining, Civil engineering and architecture - Geoengineering and mining engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Geoteknik och gruvteknik
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Future mining (AERI); Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-37986 (URN)c37d9d42-8e5a-4bab-8c74-902c2c4bda70 (Local ID)9781921522901 (ISBN)c37d9d42-8e5a-4bab-8c74-902c2c4bda70 (Archive number)c37d9d42-8e5a-4bab-8c74-902c2c4bda70 (OAI)
Conference
Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2013 : 01/07/2013 - 03/07/2013
Note
Upprättat; 2013; 20160310 (adrhal)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Halim, A. (2012). Ventilation Officers or Mine Managers?: Who should Ultimately be Responsible for Mine Ventilation? A Comparison between Western Australia and Queensland (ed.). In: (Ed.), Basil Beamish; Duncan Chalmers (Ed.), Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2011: 5-6 September 2011, Sydney, New South Wales. Paper presented at Australian Mine Ventilation Conference : 05/09/2011 - 06/09/2011 (pp. 113-115). Carlton, Vic.: The Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ventilation Officers or Mine Managers?: Who should Ultimately be Responsible for Mine Ventilation? A Comparison between Western Australia and Queensland
2012 (English)In: Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2011: 5-6 September 2011, Sydney, New South Wales / [ed] Basil Beamish; Duncan Chalmers, Carlton, Vic.: The Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy , 2012, p. 113-115Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is still debate about who should ultimately be responsible for the ventilation system in an underground mine. The Queensland Coal Mining Safety and Health Regulation 2001, states that a dedicated ventilation officer is the person, while Western Australian Mines Safety and Inspection Regulation 1995 states that it is the mine manager who is responsible; the ventilation officer acts as the manager’s principal ventilation advisor. This paper outlines a comparison between both approaches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Carlton, Vic.: The Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 2012
Keywords
Ventilation, Civil engineering and architecture - Geoengineering and mining engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Geoteknik och gruvteknik
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Future mining (AERI); Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-39813 (URN)eb2aa472-1f83-41b2-94ba-c1679cc2f0af (Local ID)9781921522628 (ISBN)eb2aa472-1f83-41b2-94ba-c1679cc2f0af (Archive number)eb2aa472-1f83-41b2-94ba-c1679cc2f0af (OAI)
Conference
Australian Mine Ventilation Conference : 05/09/2011 - 06/09/2011
Note
Upprättat; 2012; 20160310 (adrhal)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Halim, A. (2009). Installation and commissioning of new primary fans at Barrick's Kanowna Belle mine, Kalgoorlie, Australia (ed.). In: (Ed.), Durga C. Panigrahi (Ed.), Ninth International Mine Ventilation Congress: New Delhi, India, 10-13 November, 2009 : technical papers, poster session. Paper presented at International Mine Ventilation Congress : 10/11/2009 - 13/11/2009 (pp. 113-121). New Delhi: Oxford and IBH Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Installation and commissioning of new primary fans at Barrick's Kanowna Belle mine, Kalgoorlie, Australia
2009 (English)In: Ninth International Mine Ventilation Congress: New Delhi, India, 10-13 November, 2009 : technical papers, poster session / [ed] Durga C. Panigrahi, New Delhi: Oxford and IBH Publishing , 2009, p. 113-121Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Barrick's Kanowna Belle gold mine in Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, has reached a depth of 1100 m and further development will take it to 1250 m. A feasibility study undertaken in 2006 identified the mining of E block as both technically and commercially feasible. One of the major requirements of mining this block was upgrading the existing primary ventilation fans. These fans consisted of three 450 kW axial fans that provided approximately 490 m3/s of airflow. The feasibility study concluded that an additional 160 m3/s was required for E block. Subsequent study showed that in order to achieve this, two of the existing fans were to be replaced with 2 x 450 kW axial fans in series, each of them, and the other was to be replaced with a 1400 kW axial fan. The processes of installation and commissioning of these new fans are discussed in this paper.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New Delhi: Oxford and IBH Publishing, 2009
Keywords
Ventilation, Fan, Civil engineering and architecture - Geoengineering and mining engineering, Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Geoteknik och gruvteknik
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-29320 (URN)2c3104f5-5cf6-471b-a05c-9f9424482d97 (Local ID)2c3104f5-5cf6-471b-a05c-9f9424482d97 (Archive number)2c3104f5-5cf6-471b-a05c-9f9424482d97 (OAI)
Conference
International Mine Ventilation Congress : 10/11/2009 - 13/11/2009
Note
Upprättat; 2009; 20160310 (adrhal)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1196-9082

Search in DiVA

Show all publications