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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Fernberg, P., Gong, G. & Mannberg, P. (2014). Processing and properties of new polyimide composites with high temperature ability (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), 16th European Conference on Composite Materials, ECCM 2014: Seville, Spain, 22 - 26 June 2014. Paper presented at European Conference on Composite Materials : 22/06/2014 - 26/06/2014. : European Conference on Composite Materials, ECCM
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Processing and properties of new polyimide composites with high temperature ability
2014 (English)In: 16th European Conference on Composite Materials, ECCM 2014: Seville, Spain, 22 - 26 June 2014, European Conference on Composite Materials, ECCM , 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The communication present results from work on development and evaluation of new polymeric carbon fiber composites with extreme temperature performance: Tg up to 360°C is targeted. The anticipated use of such composites is found in aeroengine-applications. In the work we are exploring a new and tailored phenyl ethynyl terminated imide (PETI) formulation, specially developed for the program. The formulation utilizes crosslinkers of the Nexamide" type (from Nexam Chemical AB, Sweden). The resins are initially evaluated from a processing and property perspective. Both DSC-measurements and rheology characterization are utilized in the development. Suitable RTM-processing schemes are investigated from a viscosity point of view. The schemes are used in the composite sample manufacturing. Besides a processing perspective the study also present the first results on physical behavior of the polymers and their composites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Conference on Composite Materials, ECCM, 2014
Keywords
Composite processing, Polyimides, Rheology
National Category
Composite Science and Engineering
Research subject
Polymeric Composite Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-26830 (URN)84915749357 (Scopus ID)015f1bc8-bcdd-4b5d-8e10-8043aef93079 (Local ID)9780000000002 (ISBN)015f1bc8-bcdd-4b5d-8e10-8043aef93079 (Archive number)015f1bc8-bcdd-4b5d-8e10-8043aef93079 (OAI)
Conference
European Conference on Composite Materials : 22/06/2014 - 26/06/2014
Note
Godkänd; 2014; 20141217 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Mathew, A. P., Gong, G., Björngrim, N., Wixe, D. & Oksman, K. (2011). Moisture absorption behaviour and its impact on the mechanical properties of polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) based cellulose nanocomposites (ed.). Paper presented at . Polymer Engineering and Science, 51(11), 2136-2142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moisture absorption behaviour and its impact on the mechanical properties of polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) based cellulose nanocomposites
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2011 (English)In: Polymer Engineering and Science, ISSN 0032-3888, E-ISSN 1548-2634, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 2136-2142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellulose nanowhisker (CNW) reinforced polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) nanocomposites were prepared by melt-extrusion using a master batch process. Microscopy images showed no visible aggregation of whiskers in the matrix. The influence of CNWs and moisture absorption on the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposites was studied. The water sorption studies indicated low water uptake (<10 wt%) for all the materials. However, higher moisture uptake was obtained in the nanocomposites compared to the matrix though the diffusion co-efficient of the nanocomposites was lower. The tensile strength and modulus were decreased with the addition of CNWs to PVAc, but the reduction is lower at higher CNW concentration indicating that the plasticizing effect of the moisture was counteracted to some extent by the reinforcing effect of CNWs. Higher tensile ductility and toughness, which were dependent on moisture absorption, were achieved in the nanocomposites than pure PVAc.

National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8574 (URN)10.1002/pen.22063 (DOI)000296254700004 ()2-s2.0-80054745063 (Scopus ID)716ff7b8-11b7-4610-a229-78582a435bdf (Local ID)716ff7b8-11b7-4610-a229-78582a435bdf (Archive number)716ff7b8-11b7-4610-a229-78582a435bdf (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20110525 (krioks)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Gong, G., Mathew, A. P. & Oksman, K. (2011). Strong aqueous gels of cellulose nanofibers and nanowhiskers isolated from softwood flour (ed.). Paper presented at . TAPPI Journal, 10(2), 42565
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strong aqueous gels of cellulose nanofibers and nanowhiskers isolated from softwood flour
2011 (English)In: TAPPI Journal, ISSN 0734-1415, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 42565-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two nanocelluloses (cellulose nanofibers [CNF] and nanowhiskers [CNW]) were extracted from softwood flour using chemical refining followed either by mechanical fibrillation or acid hydrolysis. The CNF slurry formed an opaque gel that exhibited highly coiled and entangled long fibers with widths between 10 and 20 nm when studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The aqueous suspension of the CNW formed a transparent gel with unique morphology of rigid and uniform, whiskerlike structures with widths as low as 1.5-3 nm and lengths in micrometer levels. The viscoelastic properties of these hydrogels with solids content of 0.2 wt% were measured using dynamic rheology experiments. The elastic modulus (G') and viscous modulus (G '') were frequency independent in the low-frequency region. Furthermore, G' was almost 10-fold higher than G '', showing a typical elastic gel behavior. The lower crystallinity obtained from X-ray analysis indicated that the unique structure of CNW from wood could be attributed to the native cellulose being partly dissolved and regenerated during acid hydrolysis

National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14141 (URN)d7a1d520-082e-11e0-b767-000ea68e967b (Local ID)d7a1d520-082e-11e0-b767-000ea68e967b (Archive number)d7a1d520-082e-11e0-b767-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20101215 (krioks)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Gong, G., Pyo, J., Mathew, A. P. & Oksman, K. (2011). Tensile behavior, morphology and viscoelastic analysis of cellulose nanofiber-reinforced (CNF) polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) (ed.). Paper presented at . Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, 42(9), 1275-1282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tensile behavior, morphology and viscoelastic analysis of cellulose nanofiber-reinforced (CNF) polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)
2011 (English)In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 1275-1282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellulose nanofiber-reinforced (CNF) polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) composites were prepared using the twin-screw extrusion technique. The influence of CNF content on nanocomposites morphology, tensile, and viscoelastic properties was studied. The tensile modulus and strength increased with increasing CNF content, being 59% and 21% higher in 10 wt% CNF composite compared to neat PVAc. The activation volume at yielding of PVAc was decreased by CNFs, indicating restricted chain mobility. The fracture surfaces of nanocomposites showed bridging of CNFs inside the micro-cracks. The storage modulus increased for all nanocomposites compared to the matrix, being more significant in the rubbery state. Also, the activation energy for the transition increased with increased CNF content. A slight shift and broadening was observed in the tan delta peak for 10 wt% CNFs composite. The creep strain of PVAc was reduced, whereas the creep elasticity and viscosity calculated from Burger’s model were increased by the addition of CNFs.Keywords: A. Polymer-matrix composites (PMCs); B. Creep, Mechanical properties; E. Extrusion

National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3353 (URN)10.1016/j.compositesa.2011.05.009 (DOI)000293313900022 ()2-s2.0-79959997011 (Scopus ID)12b6eb91-6e99-40a6-ac2a-7a08aa078f83 (Local ID)12b6eb91-6e99-40a6-ac2a-7a08aa078f83 (Archive number)12b6eb91-6e99-40a6-ac2a-7a08aa078f83 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20110525 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Gong, G., Mathew, A. P. & Oksman, K. (2011). Toughening effect of cellulose nanowhiskers on polyvinyl acetate: Fracture toughness and viscoelastic analysis (ed.). Polymer Composites, 32(10), 1492-1498
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toughening effect of cellulose nanowhiskers on polyvinyl acetate: Fracture toughness and viscoelastic analysis
2011 (English)In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 1492-1498Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The toughening effect of cellulose nanowhiskers (CNWs) on modified polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) was analyzed with the help of morphology, relaxation, and creep behavior. The CNWs together with bound moisture at the matrix/whisker interfaces resulted in significant improvement in resistance to crack initiation and propagation. The magnitude of plastic deformation of the nanocomposites was higher than that of the neat PVAc. The relaxation temperature decreased, while the width of the damping peak increased with increasing CNW and moisture contents. The results from creep modeling showed that the instantaneous elastic modulus first increased and then decreased with the addition of CNWs, while the time-dependent elasticity and viscosity decreased. The results suggested that the reinforcing effect of the CNWs was overwhelmed by the plasticizing effect of the bound moisture. Furthermore, low concentrations of CNWs significantly improved the fracture toughness of PVAc at the minor cost of strength, stiffness, and creep resistance. In this article, we present a novel approach to studying the toughening effect of CNWs on polymers using fracture tests and viscoelastic modeling

National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-15279 (URN)10.1002/pc.21170 (DOI)000295453700002 ()2-s2.0-80052970592 (Scopus ID)ec745d70-c053-48fa-b714-922631872232 (Local ID)ec745d70-c053-48fa-b714-922631872232 (Archive number)ec745d70-c053-48fa-b714-922631872232 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2011; 20110525 (krioks)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Al-Maqdasi, Z., Gong, G., Nyström, B., Emami, N. & Joffe, R.Characterization of wood and Graphene Nanoplatelets (GNPs) Reinforced Polymer Composites.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of wood and Graphene Nanoplatelets (GNPs) Reinforced Polymer Composites
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Keywords
Graphene Nano-platelets (GNPs), masterbatch, nanocomposite, wood polymer composites (WPC), energy transport, High density polyethylene (HDPE)
National Category
Composite Science and Engineering
Research subject
Polymeric Composite Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73740 (URN)
Funder
Interreg NordNorrbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-04-24 Created: 2019-04-24 Last updated: 2019-04-30
Pupure, L., Al-Maqdasi, Z., Gong, G., Emami, N. & Joffe, R.Effect of Nano-reinforcement on the Time-dependent Properties of Graphene Modified High Density Polyethylene.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Nano-reinforcement on the Time-dependent Properties of Graphene Modified High Density Polyethylene
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Composite Science and Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73741 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-24 Created: 2019-04-24 Last updated: 2019-04-30
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3449-8233

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