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Hruzova, K., Patel, A., Masák, J., Maťátková, O., Rova, U., Christakopoulos, P. & Matsakas, L. (2020). A novel approach for the production of green biosurfactant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa using renewable forest biomass. Science of the Total Environment, 711, Article ID 135099.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A novel approach for the production of green biosurfactant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa using renewable forest biomass
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2020 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 711, article id 135099Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The rising demand for surfactants by the pharmaceuticals and cosmetic industries has generated vast amounts of petroleum-based synthetic surfactants, which are often toxic and non-degradable. Owing to their low toxicity, stability in extreme conditions, and biodegradability, biosurfactants could represent a sustainable alternative. The present study aimed to maximize the production of rhamnolipids (RL) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa by optimizing glucose concentration, temperature, and C/N and C/P ratios. After 96 h of cultivation at 37 °C, the final RL concentration was 4.18 ± 0.19 g/L with a final yield of 0.214 ± 0.010 g/gglucose when pure glucose was used as a carbon source. At present, the main obstacle towards commercialization of RL production is economic sustainability, due to the high cost of downstream processes and media components. For this reason, a renewable source such as wood hydrolysates (from birch and spruce woodchips) was examined here as a possible source of glucose for RL production. Both hydrolysates proved to be adequate, resulting in 2.34 ± 0.17 and 2.31 ± 0.10 g/L of RL, respectively, and corresponding yields of 0.081 ± 0.006 and 0.089 ± 0.004 g/gsugar after 96 h. These results demonstrate the potential of using renewable biomass for the production of biosurfactants and, to the best of our knowledge, they constitute the first report on the use of wood hydrolysates for RL production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Rhamnolipid, Biosurfactants, Pseudomonas, Wood hydrolysate, Organosolv fractionation
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76888 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.135099 (DOI)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-02-25 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-11-27 Created: 2019-11-27 Last updated: 2020-02-25Bibliographically approved
Matsakas, L., Gerber, M., Yu, L., Rova, U. & Christakopoulos, P. (2020). Preparation of low carbon impact lignin nanoparticles with controllable size by using different strategies for particles recovery. Industrial crops and products (Print), 147, Article ID 112243.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preparation of low carbon impact lignin nanoparticles with controllable size by using different strategies for particles recovery
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2020 (English)In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 147, article id 112243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lignin still remains an underutilized plentiful resource whose conversion to high-added value products is a cornerstone towards establishing a viable biomass biorefinery. Bio-materials in the form of nanoparticles represent promising high-value products with numerous downstream applications. The aim of the current work was to develop a method that would allow controlling the size of (birch and spruce) lignin nano- and micro-particles for their subsequent recovery into a solid product. We tested different two-step and one-step isolation processes and demonstrated that particle size could be easily controlled to meet different ranges (<100 nm, <500 nm, and>1 μm). In general, two-step isolation methods, i.e. a step of decrease of solvent concentration followed by isolation of lignin particles, were better for the isolation of well-defined spherical particles. In particular, the rate at which ethanol concentration was decreased played a significant role in determining the size of lignin particles. Moreover, when lignin concentration was increased from 1 % to 5 % and 10 % (w/v), particle size and homogeneity decreased slightly, but productivity augmented. The present study demonstrates that different isolation methods can be applied to obtain renewable, customarily sized, lignin spherical micro- and nano-particles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Lignin, Nanoparticles, Organosolv, Birch, Spruce
National Category
Bioprocess Technology Chemical Process Engineering
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering; Chemical Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-77832 (URN)10.1016/j.indcrop.2020.112243 (DOI)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-02-24 (alebob)

Available from: 2020-02-24 Created: 2020-02-24 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Antonopoulou, I., Spanopoulos, A. & Matsakas, L. (2020). Single cell oil and ethanol production by the oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans utilizing dried sweet sorghum stalks. Renewable energy, 146, 1609-1617
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single cell oil and ethanol production by the oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans utilizing dried sweet sorghum stalks
2020 (English)In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 146, p. 1609-1617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability of the oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans to efficiently produce lipids when cultivated in dried sweet sorghum was evaluated. First, lipid production was evaluated in synthetic media mimicking the composition of sweet sorghum stalks and optimized based on the nitrogen source and C: N ratio. Under optimum conditions, the lipid production reached 3.66 g/L with 21.91% w/w lipid content by using a mixture of sucrose, glucose and fructose and peptone at C: N ratio 160. Cultivation on pre-saccharified sweet sorghum stalks offered 1.97 g/L, while it was found that sweet sorghum stalks can support yeast growth and lipid production without the need for external nitrogen source addition. At an attempt to increase the carbon source concentration for optimizing lipid production, the Crabtree effect was observed in T. fermentans. To this end, the yeast was evaluated for its potential to produce ethanol under anaerobic conditions in synthetic media and sweet sorghum. The ethanol concentration at 100 g/L glucose was 40.31 g/L, while utilizing sweet sorghum by adding a distinct saccharification step and external nitrogen source offered ethanol concentration equal to 23.5 g/L. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time that the Crabtree effect is observed in T. fermentans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Trichosporon fermentans CBS 439.83, Crabtree effect, Ethanol, Sweet sorghum, Enzymatic saccharification, Microbial lipids
National Category
Chemical Engineering Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75377 (URN)10.1016/j.renene.2019.07.107 (DOI)000499762300016 ()2-s2.0-85069920649 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-08-14 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2019-12-20Bibliographically approved
Patel, A. & Matsakas, L. (2019). A comparative study on de novo and ex novo lipid fermentation by oleaginous yeast using glucose and sonicated waste cooking oil. Ultrasonics sonochemistry, 52, 364-374
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparative study on de novo and ex novo lipid fermentation by oleaginous yeast using glucose and sonicated waste cooking oil
2019 (English)In: Ultrasonics sonochemistry, ISSN 1350-4177, E-ISSN 1873-2828, Vol. 52, p. 364-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are only a few reports available about the assimilation of hydrophobic substrates by microorganisms, however, it is well known that oleaginous microorganisms are capable of utilizing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates and accumulate lipids via two different pathways namely de novo and ex novo lipid synthesis, respectively. In the present study, an oleaginous yeast, Cryptococcus curvatus, was investigated for its potentials to utilize a waste substrate of hydrophobic nature (waste cooking oil – WCO) and compared with its ability to utilize a hydrophilic carbon source (glucose). To facilitate the utilization of WCO by C. curvatus, the broth was sonicated to form a stable oil-in-water emulsion without adding any emulsifier, which was then compared with WCO samples without any ultrasound treatment (unsonicated) for the yeast cultivation. Ultrasonication reduces the size of hydrophobic substrates and improves their miscibility in an aqueous broth making them easily assimilated by oleaginous yeast. Under de novo lipid fermentation, the yeast synthesized 9.93 ± 0.84 g/L of cell dry weight and 5.23 ± 0.49 g/L lipids (lipid content of 52.66 ± 0.93% w/w) when cultivated on 40 g/L of glucose (C/N ratio of 40). The amount of cell dry weight, lipid concentration, and lipid content were considerably higher during the ex novo lipid synthesis. More specifically, the highest lipid content achieved was 70.13 ± 1.65% w/w with a corresponding dry cell weight and lipid concentration of 18.62 ± 0.76 g/L and 13.06 ± 0.92 g/L respectively, when grown on 20 g/L sonicated WCO. The highest lipid concentration, however, was observed when the yeast was cultivated on 40 g/L sonicated WCO. Under these conditions, 20.34 g/L lipids were produced with a lipid content of 57.05% w/w. On the other hand, lipid production with unsonicated WCO was significant lower, reaching 11.16 ± 1.02 g/L (69.14 ± 1.34% w/w of lipid content) and 12.21 ± 1.34 g/L (47.39 ± 1.67% w/w of lipid content) for 20 g/L and 40 g/L of WCO, respectively. This underpins the significance of the sonication treatment, especially at elevated WCO concentrations, to improve the accessibility of the yeast to the WCO. Sonication treatment that was used in this study assisted the utilization of WCO without the need to add emulsifiers, thus reducing the need for chemicals and in turn has a positive impact on the production costs. The microbial lipids produced presented a different fatty acid composition compared to the WCO, making them more suitable for biodiesel production as suggested by the theoretical estimation of the biodiesel properties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Oleaginous yeast, Sonicated waste cooking oil, De novo lipid accumulation, Ex novo lipid accumulation, LipidsFatty acid methyl esters
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72671 (URN)10.1016/j.ultsonch.2018.12.010 (DOI)000467509200041 ()2-s2.0-85058415972 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-05-27 (oliekm)

Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Patel, A., Matsakas, L., Rova, U. & Christakopoulos, P. (2019). A perspective on biotechnological applications of thermophilic microalgae and cyanobacteria. Bioresource Technology, 278, 424-434
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A perspective on biotechnological applications of thermophilic microalgae and cyanobacteria
2019 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 278, p. 424-434Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The importance of expanding our knowledge on microorganisms derived from extreme environments stems from the development of novel and sustainable technologies for our health, food, and environment. Microalgae and cyanobacteria represent a group of diverse microorganisms that inhabit a wide range of environments, are capable of oxygenic photosynthesis, and form a thick microbial mat even at extreme environments. Studies of thermophilic microorganisms have shown a considerable biotechnological potential due to their optimum growth and metabolisms at high temperatures (≥50 °C), which is supported by their thermostable enzymes. Microalgal and cyanobacterial communities present in high-temperature ecosystems account for a large part of the total ecosystem biomass and productivity, and can be exploited to generate several value-added products of agricultural, pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and industrial relevance. This review provides an overview on the current status of biotechnological applications of thermophilic microalgae and cyanobacteria, with an outlook on the challenges and future prospects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Thermophilic microorganisms, Microalgae, Cyanobacteria, Biotechnological applications, Biofuels, Biologically active compounds, Pigments
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73043 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2019.01.063 (DOI)000457852400049 ()30685131 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060269950 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-02-27 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-02-27 Created: 2019-02-27 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Kalogiannis, K. G., Matsakas, L., Lappas, A. A., Rova, U. & Christakopoulos, P. (2019). Aromatics from Beechwood Organosolv Lignin through Thermal and Catalytic Pyrolysis. Energies, 12(9), Article ID 1606.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aromatics from Beechwood Organosolv Lignin through Thermal and Catalytic Pyrolysis
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2019 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 12, no 9, article id 1606Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biomass fractionation, as an alternative to biomass pretreatment, has gained increasing research attention over the past few years as it provides separate streams of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. These streams can be used separately and can provide a solution for improving the economics of emerging biorefinery technologies. The sugar streams are commonly used in microbial conversions, whereas during recent years lignin has been recognized as a valuable compound as it is the only renewable and abundant source of aromatic chemicals. Successfully converting lignin into valuable chemicals and products is key in achieving both environmental and economic sustainability of future biorefineries. In this work, lignin retrieved from beechwood sawdust delignification pretreatment via an organosolv process was depolymerized with thermal and catalytic pyrolysis. ZSM-5 commercial catalyst was used in situ to upgrade the lignin bio-oil vapors. Lignins retrieved from different modes of organosolv pretreatment were tested in order to evaluate the effect that upstream pretreatment has on the lignin fraction. Both thermal and catalytic pyrolysis yielded oils rich in phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons. Use of ZSM-5 catalyst assisted in overall deoxygenation of the bio-oils and enhanced aromatic hydrocarbons production. The oxygen content of the bio-oils was reduced at the expense of their yield. Organosolv lignins were successfully depolymerized towards phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons via thermal and catalytic pyrolysis. Hence, lignin pyrolysis can be an effective manner for lignin upgrading towards high added value products

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
beechwood, organosolv delignification, lignin pyrolysis, ZSM-5, phenols, aromatic hydrocarbons
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-74900 (URN)10.3390/en12091606 (DOI)000469761700022 ()2-s2.0-85066273519 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-06-24 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Patel, A., Matsakas, L., Hruzova, K., Rova, U. & Christakopoulos, P. (2019). Biosynthesis of Nutraceutical Fatty Acids by the Oleaginous Marine Microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum Utilizing Hydrolysates from Organosolv-Pretreated Birch and Spruce Biomass. Marine Drugs, 17(12), Article ID 119.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biosynthesis of Nutraceutical Fatty Acids by the Oleaginous Marine Microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum Utilizing Hydrolysates from Organosolv-Pretreated Birch and Spruce Biomass
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2019 (English)In: Marine Drugs, ISSN 1660-3397, E-ISSN 1660-3397, Vol. 17, no 12, article id 119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential for human function, however they have to be provided through the diet. As their production from fish oil is environmentally unsustainable, there is demand for new sources of PUFAs. The aim of the present work was to establish the microalgal platform to produce nutraceutical-value PUFAs from forest biomass. To this end, the growth of Phaeodactylum tricornutum on birch and spruce hydrolysates was compared to autotrophic cultivation and glucose synthetic media. Total lipid generated by P. tricornutum grown mixotrophically on glucose, birch, and spruce hydrolysates was 1.21, 1.26, and 1.29 g/L, respectively. The highest eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) production (256 mg/L) and productivity (19.69 mg/L/d) were observed on spruce hydrolysates. These values were considerably higher than those obtained from the cultivation without glucose (79.80 mg/L and 6.14 mg/L/d, respectively) and also from the photoautotrophic cultivation (26.86 mg/L and 2.44 mg/L/d, respectively). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the use of forest biomass as raw material for EPA and docosapentaenoic acid (DHA) production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
polyunsaturated fatty acids, EPA, DHA, marine algae, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, forest biomass
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73136 (URN)10.3390/md17020119 (DOI)000460795500047 ()30781416 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061857091 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-03-07 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Charisteidis, I., Lazaridis, P., Fotopoulos, A., Pachatouridou, E., Matsakas, L., Rova, U., . . . Triantafyllidis, K. (2019). Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin Isolated by Hybrid Organosolv—Steam Explosion Pretreatment of Hardwood and Softwood Biomass for the Production of Phenolics and Aromatics. Catalysts, 9(11), Article ID 935.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin Isolated by Hybrid Organosolv—Steam Explosion Pretreatment of Hardwood and Softwood Biomass for the Production of Phenolics and Aromatics
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2019 (English)In: Catalysts, E-ISSN 2073-4344, Vol. 9, no 11, article id 935Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lignin, one of the three main structural biopolymers of lignocellulosic biomass, is the most abundant natural source of aromatics with a great valorization potential towards the production of fuels, chemicals, and polymers. Although kraft lignin and lignosulphonates, as byproducts of the pulp/paper industry, are available in vast amounts, other types of lignins, such as the organosolv or the hydrolysis lignin, are becoming increasingly important, as they are side-streams of new biorefinery processes aiming at the (bio)catalytic valorization of biomass sugars. Within this context, in this work, we studied the thermal (non-catalytic) and catalytic fast pyrolysis of softwood (spruce) and hardwood (birch) lignins, isolated by a hybrid organosolv–steam explosion biomass pretreatment method in order to investigate the effect of lignin origin/composition on product yields and lignin bio-oil composition. The catalysts studied were conventional microporous ZSM-5 (Zeolite Socony Mobil–5) zeolites and hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites with intracrystal mesopores (i.e., 9 and 45 nm) or nano-sized ZSM-5 with a high external surface. All ZSM-5 zeolites were active in converting the initially produced via thermal pyrolysis alkoxy-phenols (i.e., of guaiacyl and syringyl/guaiacyl type for spruce and birch lignin, respectively) towards BTX (benzene, toluene, xylene) aromatics, alkyl-phenols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, mainly naphthalenes), with the mesoporous ZSM-5 exhibiting higher dealkoxylation reactivity and being significantly more selective towards mono-aromatics compared to the conventional ZSM-5, for both spruce and birch lignin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
spruce and birch wood lignin, hybrid organosolv—steam explosion pretreatment, catalytic fast pyrolysis, model compounds, bio-oil, phenolics and aromatics, microporous and hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolite
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76789 (URN)10.3390/catal9110935 (DOI)000502278800061 ()2-s2.0-85074766498 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-11-20 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-11-20 Created: 2019-11-20 Last updated: 2020-02-25Bibliographically approved
Shanmugam, K., Jansson, S., Gadhamshetty, V., Matsakas, L., Rova, U., Tysklind, M., . . . Upadhyayula, V. (2019). Ecoefficiency of Thermal Insulation Sandwich Panels Based On Fly Ash Modified with Colloidal Mesoporous Silica. ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, 7(24), 20000-20012
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecoefficiency of Thermal Insulation Sandwich Panels Based On Fly Ash Modified with Colloidal Mesoporous Silica
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2019 (English)In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 7, no 24, p. 20000-20012Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current practice of landfilling fly ash generated by waste incineration is nonsustainable, so alternative ways of using this material are needed. Silanization effectively immobilizes the heavy metal contaminants in the incineration fly ash and enables its circular utilization because silanized fly ash (SFA) has market value as a low-cost filler for polymer composites. This study examines the ecoefficiency of a thermal insulation panel that consists of a polyurethane (PU) foam core sandwiched between two epoxy composite skins prepared by reinforcing glass fibers (GF) and SFA in epoxy resin. The ecoefficiency of such panels was evaluated by comparing their life cycle environmental externality costs (LCEE) to their life cycle costs (LCC). The LCEE was calculated by monetizing the panels’ environmental impacts, which were quantified by performing a life cycle assessment (LCA). The results revealed that the ecoefficiency of the composite panels is positive (47%) and superior to that of market incumbent alternatives with PU foam or rockwool cores and steel skins. The two market incumbents have negative ecoefficiencies, primarily due to their high LCEE. The environmental performance of the panel with SFA–GF epoxy composite skins can be further improved by using lignin-based epoxy resin or thermoplastic polypropylene as the polymer matrix of composite skins. Overall, application as a filler in fabricating polymer composite skins of sandwich panels is an upcycling pathway of SFA that combines circular economy prospects with sustainability benefits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2019
Keywords
Ecoefficiency, Thermal insulation sandwich panels, Colloidal mesoporous silica, Municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, Life cycle assessment, Life cycle costing, Lignin−epoxy resin
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-77121 (URN)10.1021/acssuschemeng.9b05726 (DOI)000503330400072 ()2-s2.0-85075697945 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-02-25 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-12-10 Created: 2019-12-10 Last updated: 2020-02-25Bibliographically approved
Matsakas, L., Raghavendran, V., Yakimenko, O., Persson, G., Olsson, E., Rova, U., . . . Christakopoulos, P. (2019). Lignin-first biomass fractionation using a hybrid organosolv: Steam explosion pretreatment technology improves the saccharification and fermentability of spruce biomass. Bioresource Technology, 273, 521-528
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lignin-first biomass fractionation using a hybrid organosolv: Steam explosion pretreatment technology improves the saccharification and fermentability of spruce biomass
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2019 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 273, p. 521-528Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For a transition to a sustainable society, fuels, chemicals, and materials should be produced from renewable resources. Lignocellulosic biomass constitutes an abundant and renewable feedstock; however, its successful application in a biorefinery requires efficient fractionation into its components; cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Here, we demonstrate that a newly established hybrid organosolv – steam explosion pretreatment can effectively fractionate spruce biomass to yield pretreated solids with high cellulose (72% w/w) and low lignin (delignification up to 79.4% w/w) content. The cellulose-rich pretreated solids present high saccharification yields (up to 61% w/w) making them ideal for subsequent bioconversion processes. Moreover, under high-gravity conditions (22% w/w) we obtained an ethanol titer of 61.7 g/L, the highest so far reported for spruce biomass. Finally, the obtained high-purity lignin is suitable for various advanced applications. In conclusion, hybrid organosolv pretreatment could offer a closed-loop biorefinery while simultaneously adding value to all biomass components.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Softwood, Organosolv explosion, High gravity fermentation, Fractionation, Biorefinery
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71766 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2018.11.055 (DOI)000453742100064 ()30471644 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056772752 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 2015-006989
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-11-27 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3687-6173

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