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Phounglamcheik, Aekjuthon, PhD studentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8372-4386
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Kreitzberg, T., Phounglamcheik, A., Haugen, N. E., Kneer, R. & Umeki, K. (2022). A Shortcut Method to Predict Particle Size Changes during Char Combustion and Gasification under regime II Conditions. Combustion Science and Technology, 194(2), 272-291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Shortcut Method to Predict Particle Size Changes during Char Combustion and Gasification under regime II Conditions
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2022 (English)In: Combustion Science and Technology, ISSN 0010-2202, E-ISSN 1563-521X, Vol. 194, no 2, p. 272-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In most industrial applications, combustion and gasification of char progresses under regime II conditions. Unlike in other regimes, both particle size and density change simultaneously in regime II due to non-uniform consumption of carbon inside the particles. In this work, mathematical predictions of diameter changes in regime II were made by a one-dimensional simulation tool, where transient species balances are resolved locally inside the particle. This simulation is computationally expensive and usually not appropriate for the implementation in comprehensive CFD simulations of combustion or gasification processes. To overcome this restraint, an alternative shortcut method with affordable computation time has been developed and validated against the detailed model. This method allows the calculation of diameter changes during combustion and gasification from precalculated effectiveness factors. Additionally, the change of particle size has been investigated experimentally in a single particle converter setup. Therein, particles are fixed on a sample holder placed in the hot flue gas of a flat flame burner. Size and temperature trends are optically assessed by a 3CCD camera.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
combustion, gasification, char conversion, biomass, particle size change
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76792 (URN)10.1080/00102202.2019.1678919 (DOI)000492714600001 ()2-s2.0-85074512914 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Bio4EnergySwedish Research CouncilThe Kempe FoundationsThe Research Council of Norway, 267916
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-03-01 (sofila);

Funder: German Research Foundation (215035359); Swedish Center for Biomass Gasification

Available from: 2019-11-20 Created: 2019-11-20 Last updated: 2022-07-04Bibliographically approved
Umeki, K. (2022). Dataset - Self-Heating of Biochar during Postproduction Storage by O2 Chemisorption at Low Temperatures.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dataset - Self-Heating of Biochar during Postproduction Storage by O2 Chemisorption at Low Temperatures
2022 (English)Data set, Primary data
Abstract [en]

Biochar is attracting attention as an alternative carbon/fuel source to coal in the process industry and energy sector. However, it is prone to self-heating and often leads to spontaneous ignition and thermal runaway during storage, resulting in production loss and health risks. This study investigates biochar self-heating upon its contact with O2 at low temperatures, i.e., 50–300 °C. First, kinetic parameters of O2 adsorption and CO2 release were measured in a thermogravimetric analyzer using biochar produced from a pilot-scale pyrolysis process. Then, specific heat capacity and heat of reactions were measured in a differential scanning calorimeter. Finally, a one-dimensional transient model was developed to simulate self-heating in containers and gain insight into the influences of major parameters. The model showed a good agreement with experimental measurement in a closed metal container. It was observed that char temperature slowly increased from the initial temperature due to heat released during O2 adsorption. Thermal runaway, i.e., self-ignition, was observed in some cases even at the initial biochar temperature of ca. 200 °C. However, if O2 is not permeable through the container materials, the temperature starts decreasing after the consumption of O2 in the container. The simulation model was also applied to examine important factors related to self-heating. The results suggested that self-heating can be somewhat mitigated by decreasing the void fraction, reducing storage volume, and lowering the initial char temperature. This study demonstrated a robust way to estimate the cooling demands required in the biochar production process.

Keywords
biochar, self-heating, thermal runaway, O2 chemisorption, large-scale storages, packed-bed simulation
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-88668 (URN)
Available from: 2022-01-04 Created: 2022-01-04 Last updated: 2022-01-21
Phounglamcheik, A., Johnson, N., Kienzl, N., Strasser, C. & Umeki, K. (2022). Self-Heating of Biochar during Postproduction Storage by O2 Chemisorption at Low Temperatures. Energies, 15(1), Article ID 380.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-Heating of Biochar during Postproduction Storage by O2 Chemisorption at Low Temperatures
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2022 (English)In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biochar is attracting attention as an alternative carbon/fuel source to coal in the process industry and energy sector. However, it is prone to self-heating and often leads to spontaneous ignition and thermal runaway during storage, resulting in production loss and health risks. This study investigates biochar self-heating upon its contact with O2 at low temperatures, i.e., 50–300 °C. First, kinetic parameters of O2 adsorption and CO2 release were measured in a thermogravimetric analyzer using biochar produced from a pilot-scale pyrolysis process. Then, specific heat capacity and heat of reactions were measured in a differential scanning calorimeter. Finally, a one-dimensional transient model was developed to simulate self-heating in containers and gain insight into the influences of major parameters. The model showed a good agreement with experimental measurement in a closed metal container. It was observed that char temperature slowly increased from the initial temperature due to heat released during O2 adsorption. Thermal runaway, i.e., self-ignition, was observed in some cases even at the initial biochar temperature of ca. 200 °C. However, if O2 is not permeable through the container materials, the temperature starts decreasing after the consumption of O2 in the container. The simulation model was also applied to examine important factors related to self-heating. The results suggested that self-heating can be somewhat mitigated by decreasing the void fraction, reducing storage volume, and lowering the initial char temperature. This study demonstrated a robust way to estimate the cooling demands required in the biochar production process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
biochar, self-heating, thermal runaway, O2 chemisorption, large-scale storages, packed-bed simulation
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-88691 (URN)10.3390/en15010380 (DOI)000741139200001 ()2-s2.0-85122269482 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-01-10 (johcin);

Funder: FFG (Austrian Research Promotion Agency) program COMET (Competence Center for Excellent Technolgies) (869341)

Available from: 2022-01-10 Created: 2022-01-10 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Phounglamcheik, A., Bäckebo, M., Robinson, R. & Umeki, K. (2022). The significance of intraparticle and interparticle diffusion during CO2 gasification of biomass char in a packed bed. Fuel, 310, Article ID 122302.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The significance of intraparticle and interparticle diffusion during CO2 gasification of biomass char in a packed bed
2022 (English)In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 310, article id 122302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the influences of intraparticle and interparticle diffusions on the reaction rates of char gasification in a packed bed without forced convective flows. The main objective is to elucidate how the dominant scales of mass diffusion resistance change based on particle size distributions (PSD). CO2 gasification rates were measured by thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) of spruce char produced from pilot-scale reactors. Experimental setups using two TGA devices highlighted the effects on different rate-limiting steps. Effects of intraparticle diffusion were investigated with a single layer of monodispersed particles between 75 µm and 6.3 mm using a commercial TGA. Effects of interparticle diffusion were investigated with a packed bed of monodispersed and polydispersed particles using a macro-TG. At the particle scale, gasification rate decreased with the increase of particle size when the reaction was controlled by intraparticle diffusion. This effect can be described by the effectiveness factor with Thiele modulus. At the bed scale, void fraction and tortuosity of the packed bed are influential parameters on diffusivity of CO2 through the bed channels. Due to its non-sphericity of the char particles, the bed of relatively large particles had high void fraction and the presence of smaller particles were essential to lower the bed void size. Consequently, smaller size fraction in the PSD had a major impact on the diffusion resistance at bed scale. It means that the diffusion resistances at particle and bed scales are sensitive to different size fractions in the PSD. It allows one to tweak the overall reaction rates in packed beds by manipulating the PSD if the dominant mass transport mechanism is diffusion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Biomass char, Packed bed, CO2 gasification rate, Intraparticle diffusion, Interparticle diffusion, Particle size distribution
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-87677 (URN)10.1016/j.fuel.2021.122302 (DOI)000717770400004 ()2-s2.0-85117697891 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 46974-1
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-10-28 (beamah)

Available from: 2021-10-28 Created: 2021-10-28 Last updated: 2023-09-08Bibliographically approved
Phounglamcheik, A. (2021). Bio-coal for the sustainable industry: A scientific approach to optimizing production, storage, and usages. (Doctoral dissertation). Luleå: Luleå University of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bio-coal for the sustainable industry: A scientific approach to optimizing production, storage, and usages
2021 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Bio-coal produced from biomass is a promising material to replace fossil coal in order to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emission from the industrial sector. Bio-coal with quality comparable to that of fossil coal can be produced by high-temperature pyrolysis at ≥500 ºC, but the production efficiency is relatively low due to low bio-coal yield at high pyrolysis temperatures. This trade-off suffers the economic feasibility of bio-coal production. The overall objective of this doctoral thesis is to develop a pyrolysis process that can produce bio-coal for fossil coal replacement in the industrial sector, while maintaining a high process efficiency.   To increase bio-coal yield and process efficiency, secondary char formation during the pyrolysis of thick biomass, for example, woodchips, is the primary method considered in this work. Secondary char formation can be promoted by increasing volatile concentration during pyrolysis and/or extending residence time of volatiles inside the pore structure of wood particles. This study investigated how to increase secondary char formation using bio-oil recycling and CO2 purging. Bio-oil recycling increased bio-coal yield by not only increasing the reactants, but also through the synergetic effect between bio-oil and woodchips upon physical contact. Using CO2 as a purging gas reduced mass diffusion of volatiles inside the pore structure of woodchips, producing extra bio-coal. In addition, the effect of these techniques can be maximized by ensuring good contact between the volatiles and the solid surface using thick particles and slow heating. In parallel, a numerical model of pyrolysis in a rotary kiln reactor was developed to increase the understanding of parameter implementation in pyrolysis reactors. Two important parameters were studied: rotation speed and feeding rate. Rotation speed controlled the solid residence time, while the feeding rate influenced the heat capacity of holdup materials and product distribution.   Bio-coal is prone to self-heating and usually causes spontaneous ignition during production, storage, and transportation, which can lead to losses in the production and health of workers. In this study, self-heating at low temperatures was investigated by using numerical simulations describing the changes in local properties inside different bio-coal containers such as closed metal containers and woven plastic bags. The kinetic parameters of bio-coal were measured and implemented in the model. It was observed that the bio-coal temperature slowly increased from the initial temperature due to the heat released during O2 chemisorption. Thermal runaway occurred in some storage conditions, even at intial bio-coal temperatures of ca. 155 ºC. The simulation results suggest that self-heating can be mitigated by using small and wide particle distribution, limited storage volume, and low ambient temperature. This study also provides the criteria for estimating the cooling demands in bio-coal production processes.   Bio-coal properties are the main challenges for utilizing it as a substitute for fossil coal. Although the elemental composition and heating value of the bio-coal produced in this study are equivalent to those of fossil coal, the reactivity of bio-coal is relatively high. To replace fossil coal in existing industrial processes, bio-coal reactivity is preferred to be similar to that of fossil coal to avoid major process modifications. This thesis has concluded that pyrolysis temperature, heating rate, and biomass feedstock are the major parameters influencing the gasification rate under chemical reaction limitation. It was found that potassium in biomasses increased bio-coal reactivity even at low gasification temperatures such as 800 ºC, while calcium did not play a significant role at temperatures below 1600 ºC. Furthermore, bio-coal reactivity increased only slightly by promoting secondary char formation using the proposed methods. These findings suggest that we can achieve high bio-coal yield, both mass and energy, while maintaining similar fuel properties through pyrolysis with bio-oil recycling and CO2 purging.   In the most industrially relevant applications, the gasification rate is dominated by diffusion mass transfer. Therefore, it is necessary to reflect gasification behavior of bio-coal under these circumstances. At the particle scale, where intraparticle diffusion controls the overall reaction rate, bio-coal particle size was nearly constant until high conversion. This implies that particle size changes should be considered only at high conversion. Meanwhile, large particles exhibit low gasification rate at the particle scale following the Thiele modulus. The contrary result appears at the packed bed scale, where both intraparticle and interparticle diffusions play roles. Large particles increased the gasification rate in packed beds because of the large bed channel size, high void fraction, and low tortuosity. This observation led to an opportunity to minimize the apparent gasification rate in a packed bed by using polydisperse particles, which have a wide particle size distribution. Large particles maximize the intraparticle diffusivity of CO2, while small particles fill the gaps between large particles, thus increasing interparticle diffusivity, which reduces apparent reactivity. This outcome was confirmed experimentally.   By combining the knowledge obtained in this doctoral thesis, an efficient pyrolysis process is proposed to produce bio-coal for a sustainable industry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2021
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-84564 (URN)978-91-7790-862-3 (ISBN)978-91-7790-863-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2021-09-24, E231, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2021-05-20 Created: 2021-05-20 Last updated: 2021-09-02Bibliographically approved
Phounglamcheik, A., Vila, R., Kienzl, N., Wang, L., Hedayati, A., Broström, M., . . . Umeki, K. (2021). CO2 Gasification Reactivity of Char from High-Ash Biomass. ACS Omega, 6(49), 34115-34128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CO2 Gasification Reactivity of Char from High-Ash Biomass
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2021 (English)In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 6, no 49, p. 34115-34128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biomass char produced from pyrolysis processes is of great interest to be utilized as renewable solid fuels or materials. Forest byproducts and agricultural wastes are low-cost and sustainable biomass feedstocks. These biomasses generally contain high amounts of ash-forming elements, generally leading to high char reactivity. This study elaborates in detail how chemical and physical properties affect CO2 gasification rates of high-ash biomass char, and it also targets the interactions between these properties. Char produced from pine bark, forest residue, and corncobs (particle size 4–30 mm) were included, and all contained different relative compositions of ash-forming elements. Acid leaching was applied to further investigate the influence of inorganic elements in these biomasses. The char properties relevant to the gasification rate were analyzed, that is, elemental composition, specific surface area, and carbon structure. Gasification rates were measured at an isothermal condition of 800 °C with 20% (vol.) of CO2 in N2. The results showed that the inorganic content, particularly K, had a stronger effect on gasification reactivity than specific surface area and aromatic cluster size of the char. At the gasification condition utilized in this study, K could volatilize and mobilize through the char surface, resulting in high gasification reactivity. Meanwhile, the mobilization of Ca did not occur at the low temperature applied, thus resulting in its low catalytic effect. This implies that the dispersion of these inorganic elements through char particles is an important reason behind their catalytic activity. Upon leaching by diluted acetic acid, the K content of these biomasses substantially decreased, while most of the Ca remained in the biomasses. With a low K content in leached biomass char, char reactivity was determined by the active carbon surface area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2021
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering; Experimental Mechanics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-88540 (URN)10.1021/acsomega.1c05728 (DOI)000757388000083 ()34926959 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85120655810 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-01-01 (johcin)

Available from: 2021-12-20 Created: 2021-12-20 Last updated: 2022-03-17Bibliographically approved
Schneider, C., Walker, S., Phounglamcheik, A., Umeki, K. & Kolb, T. (2021). Effect of calcium dispersion and graphitization during high-temperature pyrolysis of beech wood char on the gasification rate with CO2. Fuel, 283, Article ID 118826.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of calcium dispersion and graphitization during high-temperature pyrolysis of beech wood char on the gasification rate with CO2
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2021 (English)In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 283, article id 118826Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents thermal deactivation of beech wood chars during secondary pyrolysis in a drop-tube reactor. Pyrolysis temperature was varied between 1000 °C and 1600 °C at a constant residence time of 200 ms. The effect of pyrolysis conditions on initial conversion rate R0 during gasification, graphitization of the carbon matrix and ash morphology was investigated. Gasification experiments for the determination of R0 were conducted in a thermogravimetric analyzer using pure CO2 at 750 °C and isothermal conditions. A linear decrease in initial conversion rate R0 was observed between 1000 °C and 1400 °C. However, a strong increase of R0 at 1600 °C was encountered. Micropore surface area of the secondary chars showed no correlation with the initial conversion rate R0 during gasification with CO2. Graphitization of the carbon matrix was determined using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy suggesting the growth of aromatic clusters and graphite-like structures for increasing pyrolysis temperatures up to 1600 °C. Furthermore, CaO dispersion was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively using temperature-programmed reaction at 300 °C as well as SEM/TEM. CaO dispersion DCaO decreases steadily between 1000 °C and 1400 °C whereas a strong increase can be observed at 1600 °C, which is in good accordance with the development of the initial conversion rate R0 as a function of pyrolysis temperature. SEM/TEM images indicate the formation of a thin CaO layer at 1600 °C that is presumably responsible for the strong increase in initial conversion rate R0 at this temperature. When excluding the catalytic activity of CaO via formation of the ratio R0 DCaO−1, increasing graphitization degree has a linear negative influence on char reactivity at pyrolysis temperatures between 1000 °C and 1400 °C.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Biomass char, Pyrolysis, Gasification, Graphitization, Ash dispersion
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-80502 (URN)10.1016/j.fuel.2020.118826 (DOI)000584919700110 ()2-s2.0-85089351022 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-08-20 (alebob)

Available from: 2020-08-20 Created: 2020-08-20 Last updated: 2020-12-17Bibliographically approved
Das, O., Mensah, R. A., George, G., Jiang, L., Xu, Q., Neisiany, R. E., . . . Berto, F. (2021). Flammability and mechanical properties of biochars made in different pyrolysis reactors. Biomass and Bioenergy, 152, Article ID 106197.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flammability and mechanical properties of biochars made in different pyrolysis reactors
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2021 (English)In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 152, article id 106197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effect of pyrolysis reactors on the properties of biochars (with a focus on flammability and mechanical characteristics) were investigated by keeping factors such as feedstock, carbonisation temperature, heating rate and residence time constant. The reactors employed were hydrothermal, fixed-bed batch vertical and fixed-bed batch horizontal-tube reactors. The vertical and tube reactors, at the same temperature, produced biochars having comparable elemental carbon content, surface functionalities, thermal degradation pattern and peak heat release rates. The hydrothermal reactor, although, a low-temperature process, produced biochar with high fire resistance because the formed tarry volatiles sealed water inside the pores, which hindered combustion. However, the biochar from hydrothermal reactor had the lowest nanoindentation properties whereas the tube reactor-produced biochar at 300 °C had the highest nanoindentation-hardness (290 Megapascal) and modulus (ca. 4 Gigapascal) amongst the other tested samples. Based on the inherent flammability and mechanical properties of biochars, polymeric composites’ properties can be predicted that can include them as constituents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Biochar, Carbonisation, Flammability, Nanoindentation, Composites
National Category
Energy Engineering Chemical Process Engineering
Research subject
Structural Engineering; Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-86491 (URN)10.1016/j.biombioe.2021.106197 (DOI)000686120900003 ()2-s2.0-85111300252 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Bio4Energy
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-07-29 (beamah)

Available from: 2021-07-29 Created: 2021-07-29 Last updated: 2022-10-27Bibliographically approved
Phounglamcheik, A., Wang, L., Romar, H., Kienzl, N., Broström, M., Ramser, K., . . . Umeki, K. (2020). Effects of Pyrolysis Conditions and Feedstocks on the Properties and Gasification Reactivity of Charcoal from Woodchips. Energy & Fuels, 34(7), 8353-8365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Pyrolysis Conditions and Feedstocks on the Properties and Gasification Reactivity of Charcoal from Woodchips
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2020 (English)In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 8353-8365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pyrolysis conditions in charcoal production affect yields, properties, and further use of charcoal. Reactivity is a critical property when using charcoal as an alternative to fossil coal and coke, as fuel or reductant, in different industrial processes. This work aimed to obtain a holistic understanding of the effects of pyrolysis conditions on the reactivity of charcoal. Notably, this study focuses on the complex effects that appear when producing charcoal from large biomass particles in comparison with the literature on pulverized biomass. Charcoals were produced from woodchips under a variety of pyrolysis conditions (heating rate, temperature, reaction gas, type of biomass, and bio-oil embedding). Gasification reactivity of produced charcoal was determined through thermogravimetric analysis under isothermal conditions of 850 degrees C and 20% of CO2. The charcoals were characterized for the elemental composition, specific surface area, pore volume and distribution, and carbon structure. The analysis results were used to elucidate the relationship between the pyrolysis conditions and the reactivity. Heating rate and temperature were the most influential pyrolysis parameters affecting charcoal reactivity, followed by the reaction gas and bio-oil embedding. The effects of these pyrolysis conditions on charcoal reactivity could primarily be explained by the difference in the meso- and macropore volume and the size and structural order of aromatic clusters. The lower reactivity of slow pyrolysis charcoals also coincided with their lower catalytic inorganic content. The reactivity difference between spruce and birch charcoals appears to be mainly caused by the difference in catalytically active inorganic elements. Contrary to pyrolysis of pulverized biomass, a low heating rate produced a higher specific surface area compared with a high heating rate. Furthermore, the porous structure and the reactivity of charcoal produced from woodchips were influenced when the secondary char formation was promoted, which cannot be observed in pyrolysis of pulverized biomass.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2020
National Category
Energy Engineering Applied Mechanics
Research subject
Experimental Mechanics; Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-80479 (URN)10.1021/acs.energyfuels.0c00592 (DOI)000551544900047 ()2-s2.0-85090237592 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-08-20 (johcin)

Available from: 2020-08-20 Created: 2020-08-20 Last updated: 2021-05-20Bibliographically approved
Phounglamcheik, A. (2018). Biocarbon for fossil coal replacement. (Licentiate dissertation). Luleå: Luleå University of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biocarbon for fossil coal replacement
2018 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Biokol for ersättning av fossil kol
Abstract [en]

This research aims to provide a full view of knowledge in charcoal production for fossil coal replacement. Charcoal from biomass is a promising material to replace fossil coal, which is using as heating source or reactant in the industrial sector. Nowadays, charcoal with quality comparable to fossil coal is produced by high-temperature pyrolysis, but efficiency of the production is relatively low due to the trade-off between charcoal property and yield by pyrolysis temperature. Increasing charcoal yield by means of secondary char formation in pyrolysis of large wood particles is the primary method considering in this work. This research has explored increasing efficiency of charcoal production by bio-oil recycling and CO2 purging. These proposed techniques significantly increase concentration and extend residence time of volatiles inside particle of woodchip resulting extra charcoal. Characterization of charcoals implies negligible effect of these methods on charcoal properties such as elemental composition, heating value, morphological structure, and chemical structure. Besides, reactivity of charcoal slightly increased when these methods were applied. A numerical model of pyrolysis in a rotary kiln reactor has been developed to study the effect of design parameters and conditions in reactor scale. The simulation results showed fair prediction of temperature profiles and products distribution along the reactor length. Nonetheless, to deliver full knowledge in charcoal production, further works are planned to be done at the end of this doctoral research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2018
Series
Licentiate thesis / Luleå University of Technology, ISSN 1402-1757
Keywords
Biomass pyrolysis, charcoal, bio-oil recycling, CO2 utilization, reactivity, rotary drum
National Category
Energy Engineering Chemical Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71324 (URN)978-91-7790-242-3 (ISBN)978-91-7790-243-0 (ISBN)
Presentation
2018-12-11, Lueå University of Technology, Luleå, 10:56 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-10-25 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2021-10-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8372-4386

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