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Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Cockell, C. S., Martin-Torres, J., Zorzano, M.-P., Bhardwaj, A., Soria-Salinas, Á., Mathanla, T., . . . Suckling, B. (2019). Subsurface scientific exploration of extraterrestrial environments (MINAR 5): analogue science, technology and education in the Boulby Mine, UK. International Journal of Astrobiology, 18(2), 157-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subsurface scientific exploration of extraterrestrial environments (MINAR 5): analogue science, technology and education in the Boulby Mine, UK
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Astrobiology, ISSN 1473-5504, E-ISSN 1475-3006, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 157-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The deep subsurface of other planetary bodies is of special interest for robotic and human exploration. The subsurface provides access to planetary interior processes, thus yielding insights into planetary formation and evolution. On Mars, the subsurface might harbour the most habitable conditions. In the context of human exploration, the subsurface can provide refugia for habitation from extreme surface conditions. We describe the fifth Mine Analogue Research (MINAR 5) programme at 1 km depth in the Boulby Mine, UK in collaboration with Spaceward Bound NASA and the Kalam Centre, India, to test instruments and methods for the robotic and human exploration of deep environments on the Moon and Mars. The geological context in Permian evaporites provides an analogue to evaporitic materials on other planetary bodies such as Mars. A wide range of sample acquisition instruments (NASA drills, Small Planetary Impulse Tool (SPLIT) robotic hammer, universal sampling bags), analytical instruments (Raman spectroscopy, Close-Up Imager, Minion DNA sequencing technology, methane stable isotope analysis, biomolecule and metabolic life detection instruments) and environmental monitoring equipment (passive air particle sampler, particle detectors and environmental monitoring equipment) was deployed in an integrated campaign. Investigations included studying the geochemical signatures of chloride and sulphate evaporitic minerals, testing methods for life detection and planetary protection around human-tended operations, and investigations on the radiation environment of the deep subsurface. The MINAR analogue activity occurs in an active mine, showing how the development of space exploration technology can be used to contribute to addressing immediate Earth-based challenges. During the campaign, in collaboration with European Space Agency (ESA), MINAR was used for astronaut familiarization with future exploration tools and techniques. The campaign was used to develop primary and secondary school and primary to secondary transition curriculum materials on-site during the campaign which was focused on a classroom extra vehicular activity simulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridges Institutes Press, 2019
National Category
Geochemistry Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70069 (URN)10.1017/S1473550418000186 (DOI)000463227400006 ()
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-04-12 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-07-04 Created: 2018-07-04 Last updated: 2019-04-17Bibliographically approved
Soria-Salinas, Á., Zorzano Mier, M.-P., Martin-Torres, J., Sánchez-García-Casarrubios, J., Pérez-Díaz, J.-L. & Vakkada Ramachandran, A. (2017). A Xenon Mass Gauging through Heat Transfer Modeling for Electric Propulsion Thrusters. World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology: An International Journal of Science, Engineering and Technology, 11(1), 94-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Xenon Mass Gauging through Heat Transfer Modeling for Electric Propulsion Thrusters
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2017 (English)In: World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology: An International Journal of Science, Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2010-376X, E-ISSN 2070-3740, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 94-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current state-of-the-art methods of mass gauging of Electric Propulsion (EP) propellants in microgravity conditions rely on external measurements that are taken at the surface of the tank. The tanks are operated under a constant thermal duty cycle to store the propellant within a pre-defined temperature and pressure range. We demonstrate using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations that the heat-transfer within the pressurized propellant generates temperature and density anisotropies. This challenges the standard mass gauging methods that rely on the use of time changing skin-temperatures and pressures. We observe that the domes of the tanks are prone to be overheated, and that a long time after the heaters of the thermal cycle are switched off, the system reaches a quasi-equilibrium state with a more uniform density. We propose a new gauging method, which we call the Improved PVT method, based on universal physics and thermodynamics principles, existing TRL-9 technology and telemetry data. This method only uses as inputs the temperature and pressure readings of sensors externally attached to the tank. These sensors can operate during the nominal thermal duty cycle. The improved PVT method shows little sensitivity to the pressure sensor drifts which are critical towards the end-of-life of the missions, as well as little sensitivity to systematic temperature errors. The retrieval method has been validated experimentally with CO2 in gas and fluid state in a chamber that operates up to 82 bar within a nominal thermal cycle of 38 °C to 42 °C. The mass gauging error is shown to be lower than 1% the mass at the beginning of life, assuming an initial tank load at 100 bar. In particular, for a pressure of about 70 bar, just below the critical pressure of CO2, the error of the mass gauging in gas phase goes down to 0.1% and for 77 bar, just above the critical point, the error of the mass gauging of the liquid phase is 0.6% of initial tank load. This gauging method improves by a factor of 8 the accuracy of the standard PVT retrievals using look-up tables with tabulated data from the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, 2017
Keywords
Electric propulsion, mass gauging, propellant, PVT, xenon.
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-61373 (URN)10.5281/zenodo.1339694 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish National Space Board
Available from: 2017-01-10 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2018-11-19Bibliographically approved
Soria-Salinas, Á., Zorzano Mier, M.-P. & Martin-Torres, J. (2016). Convective Heat Transfer at the Martian Boundary Layer, Measurement and Model. In: : . Paper presented at European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016, Vienna, Austria, 17–22 April 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Convective Heat Transfer at the Martian Boundary Layer, Measurement and Model
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Engineering and Technology Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science; Space Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62743 (URN)
Conference
European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016, Vienna, Austria, 17–22 April 2016
Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Soria-Salinas, Á., Zorzano Mier, M.-P. & Martin-Torres, J. (2016). Thermal and Heat Transfer Studies Using the HABIT Instrument on the ExoMars 2018 Surface Platform. In: : . Paper presented at 67th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2016, Guadalajara, Mexico, 26-30 September 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermal and Heat Transfer Studies Using the HABIT Instrument on the ExoMars 2018 Surface Platform
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Aerospace Engineering Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Space Technology; Atmospheric science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62748 (URN)
Conference
67th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2016, Guadalajara, Mexico, 26-30 September 2016
Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Soria-Salinas, Á., Wittman, P., Zorzano Mier, M.-P. & Martin-Torres, J. (2016). Wind Retrieval Measurements for the Mars Surface Exploration. In: : . Paper presented at SRS 2016 Annual Meeting, Umeå, 16-17 March 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wind Retrieval Measurements for the Mars Surface Exploration
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We present a novel method to quantify the heat transfer coefficient h at the near environment of a spacecraft operating under Mars surface atmospheric conditions. As part of the scientific instruments of the ExoMars 2018 Surface Platform, the HABIT (HabitAbility: Brines, Irradiance and Temperature) instrument will be operating on Mars surface in order to establish the habitability of the landing site. By resolving the energy balance equation in temperatures over the three HABIT Air Temperature Sensor (ATS), we will retrieve the fluid temperature Tf and the known as m-parameter directly related with the heat transfer coefficient and sensitive to variations in wind density and velocity field

Keywords
Heat transfer; Mars, Boundary Layer, Wind.
National Category
Aerospace Engineering Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Atmospheric science; Space Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62740 (URN)
Conference
SRS 2016 Annual Meeting, Umeå, 16-17 March 2016
Funder
Swedish National Space Board
Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Soria-Salinas, Á., Zorzano Mier, M.-P., Martin-Torres, J. & Feiccabrino, J. (2015). Convective Heat Transfer Measurements at the Martian Surface. In: : . Paper presented at 1st Symposium on Space Educational Activities, Padova, Italy, 9-12 December 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Convective Heat Transfer Measurements at the Martian Surface
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Keywords
Mars; HABIT; Heat Transfer.
National Category
Aerospace Engineering Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Atmospheric science; Space Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62739 (URN)
Conference
1st Symposium on Space Educational Activities, Padova, Italy, 9-12 December 2015
Funder
Swedish National Space Board
Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Ekman, J., Antti, M.-L., Martin-Torres, J., Emami, R., Törlind, P., Kuhn, T., . . . Fakhardji, W. (2015). Projekt: Rymdforskarskolan. Paper presented at .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Projekt: Rymdforskarskolan
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2015 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

The Graduate School of Space Technology

National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Other Materials Engineering Aerospace Engineering Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear) Chemical Process Engineering
Research subject
Industrial Electronics; Engineering Materials; Atmospheric science; Onboard space systems; Product Innovation; Machine Elements; Chemical Technology; Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-36154 (URN)8c1c49e5-8fd1-4b50-992e-abd48bc5619c (Local ID)8c1c49e5-8fd1-4b50-992e-abd48bc5619c (Archive number)8c1c49e5-8fd1-4b50-992e-abd48bc5619c (OAI)
Note

Publikationer: Opportunities and Challenges for Additive Manufacturing in Space Applications; Status: Ongoing; Period: 01/01/2015 → …; End date: 31/12/2018

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
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