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Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Nyström, M. B. T., Eriksson Sörman, D., Kormi-Nouri, R. & Rönnlund, M. (2019). To what extent is subjective well-being in late adulthood related to subjective and objective memory functioning? Five-year cross-lagged panel analyses. Aging & Mental Health, 23(1), 92-99
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To what extent is subjective well-being in late adulthood related to subjective and objective memory functioning? Five-year cross-lagged panel analyses
2019 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Applied Psychology Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78364 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2017.1394439 (DOI)000461682000013 ()29086589 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032693420 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 345-2003-3883Swedish Research Council, 315-2004-6977Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205
Available from: 2020-04-06 Created: 2020-04-06 Last updated: 2024-03-28Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Körning Ljungberg, J. & Rönnlund, M. (2018). Reading Habits Among Older Adults in Relation to Level and 15-Year Changes in Verbal Fluency and Episodic Recall. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, Article ID 1872.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading Habits Among Older Adults in Relation to Level and 15-Year Changes in Verbal Fluency and Episodic Recall
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 1872Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main objective of this study was to investigate reading habits in older adults in relation to level and 15-year changes in verbal fluency and episodic recall. We examined a sample of 1157 participants (55 years at baseline) up to 15 years after the baseline assessment using latent growth curve modeling of cognitive measures with baseline reading frequency (books, weekly magazines) as a predictor of cognitive level (intercept) and rate of change (slope). Subgroup analyses were performed to investigate the role of an early adult g factor in the association between reading habits and cognitive ability in midlife. Frequent reading of books, but not of magazines, was associated with higher levels of verbal fluency and recall but unrelated to rate of longitudinal decline. Subgroup analyses indicated that the g factor in early adulthood predicted reading and cognitive level in midlife and this factor removed the current association between reading habits and level of cognitive ability (both cognitive factors). The results indicate an enduring relationship between book reading and level of cognitive ability across the adult life span and provide little support of the hypothesis that frequent reading protects against latelife cognitive decline. The extent to which book reading promotes cognitive functioning in childhood/youth remains to be demonstrated. Intervention studies may be useful in this regard.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
reading habits, cognitive aging, longitudinal analyses, verbal fluency, episodic recall, early adult intelligence
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76297 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01872 (DOI)000445805800001 ()30319520 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054073636 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-08 Created: 2019-10-08 Last updated: 2024-03-27Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Rönnlund, M., Sundström, A., Norberg, M. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2017). Social Network Size and Cognitive Functioning in Middle-Aged Adults: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations. Journal of Adult Development, 24(2), 77-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Network Size and Cognitive Functioning in Middle-Aged Adults: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Adult Development, ISSN 1068-0667, E-ISSN 1573-3440, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of the present study was to examine relations between social network size and three cognitive abilities (episodic memory, semantic memory, visuospatial ability) in middle-aged adults. We analyzed cross-sectional data on social network size and cognitive functioning that were available for 804 participants aged 40–60 years. In addition, we examined 5- and 10-year follow-up measurements of cognitive functioning that were available for 604 and 255 participants, respectively. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a positive association between social network size and each of the three cognitive abilities. Baseline network size was positively related to 5-year changes in semantic memory, and to 10-year changes in semantic as well as episodic memory, but was unrelated to changes in visuospatial performance. A minor portion of the sample (n = 131) had 10-year follow-up data on network size. Cross-lagged panel correlations revealed that baseline network size was associated with follow-up measurement in cognitive functioning (episodic memory, semantic memory), whereas baseline cognitive performance was unrelated to future network size. Together, the results demonstrate a small but positive relation between network size and declarative memory abilities, in line with models proposing a cognitive reserve built up by factors such as the increased cognitive stimulation associated with a more extensive social network.

Keywords
Cognition, Longitudinal, Cross-sectional, Social network, Cognitive reserve
National Category
Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78365 (URN)10.1007/s10804-016-9248-3 (DOI)000399825300001 ()2-s2.0-84995390392 (Scopus ID)
Note

Originally published in manuscript form.

Full text license: CC BY

Available from: 2020-04-06 Created: 2020-04-06 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Hansson, P. & Rönnlund, M. (2016). Blood Pressure Levels and Longitudinal Changes in Relation to Social Network Factors. Psychological Topics, 25(1), 59-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blood Pressure Levels and Longitudinal Changes in Relation to Social Network Factors
2016 (English)In: Psychological Topics, ISSN 1332-0742, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 59-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between social network variables and levels of and longitudinal changes in blood pressure in a middle-aged/older sample. The participants (50-75 years at baseline; n=1097) responded to questions concerning social relationships at baseline and their blood pressure (diastolic, systolic) was measured. Blood pressure levels were reassessed 5, 10, and 15 years later. Latent growth models with responses to questions concerning social relationships as predictors and basic demographic factors (age, sex) as covariates, unexpectedly indicated that a more limited social network (no close friend, few visits, little contact with friends in other ways, not living with someone, and a composite index based on all questions) was associated with significantly lower diastolic blood pressure levels. For systolic blood pressure a similar result was observed for one of the variables (lack of a close friend). In general, these effects diminished over time, as indexed by the positive relationship between several of the social variables and slope. The results were little affected by inclusion of additional covariates (e.g. measures of psychological distress, smoking/alcohol habits, and BMI) suggesting that the origins of this unexpected pattern of findings must probably be sought for in other subjectrelated factors, such as, for example, increased help seeking. Future studies should consider qualitative aspects (e.g. feelings of loneliness, quality of social relationships) in addition to structural aspects to provide a better understanding of these associations.

Keywords
blood pressure, social network, cross-sectional, longitudinal
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78371 (URN)
Available from: 2020-04-06 Created: 2020-04-06 Last updated: 2020-04-14Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Rönnlund, M., Sundström, A., Adolfsson, R. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2015). Social relationships and risk of dementia: a population-based study. International psychogeriatrics, 27(8), 1391-1399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social relationships and risk of dementia: a population-based study
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2015 (English)In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 1391-1399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The objective was to examine whether aspects of social relationships in old age are associated with all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Methods: We studied 1,715 older adults (≥ 65 years) who were dementia-free at baseline over a period of up to 16 years. Data on living status, contact/visit frequency, satisfaction with contact frequency, and having/not having a close friend were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regressions with all-cause dementia or AD as the dependent variable. To control for reverse causality and to identify potential long-term effects, we additionally performed analyses with delayed entry.

Results: We identified 373 incident cases of dementia (207 with AD) during follow-up. The variable visiting/visits from friends was associated with reduced risk of all-cause dementia. Further, a higher value on the relationships index (sum of all variables) was associated with reduced risk of all-cause dementia and AD. However, in analyses with delayed entry, restricted to participants with a survival time of three years or more, none of the social relationship variables was associated with all-cause dementia or AD.

Conclusions: The results indicate that certain aspects of social relationships are associated with incident dementia or AD, but also that these associations may reflect reverse causality. Future studies aimed at identifying other factors of a person's social life that may have the potential to postpone dementia should consider the effects of reverse causality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keywords
dementia, Alzheimer's disease, longitudinal, social relationships, social network
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78366 (URN)10.1017/S1041610215000319 (DOI)000361384500014 ()25779679 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84936891029 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-04-06 Created: 2020-04-06 Last updated: 2022-11-08Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D. & Rönnlund, M. (2011). Ger en aktiv livsstil bättre minne?. Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning, 20(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ger en aktiv livsstil bättre minne?
2011 (Swedish)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Det sägs ibland att aktivteter som stimulerar hjärnan förbättrar minnet. En rad studier indikerar också att olika typer av livsstilsfaktorer hänger samman med prestation i kognitiva test. De visar att dålig minnesförmåga är överrepresenterad hos dem som inte ägnar sig åt fritidsaktiviteter såsom att läsa, idrotta och lägga pussel.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning, 2011
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78372 (URN)
Available from: 2020-04-06 Created: 2020-04-06 Last updated: 2020-04-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5726-4101

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