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Hansson, Patrik
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Eriksson Sörman, D., Hansson, P. & Körning Ljungberg, J. (2019). Different Features of Bilingualism in Relation to Executive Functioning. Frontiers in Psychology, 10(269)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different Features of Bilingualism in Relation to Executive Functioning
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, no 269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The notion that the long-term practice of managing two languages is beneficial for the executive control system is an ongoing debate. Criticism have been raised that studies demonstrating a bilingual advantage often suffer from small sample sizes, and do not control for fluid intelligence as a possible confound. Taking those suggested factors into account, focusing on older bilingual age groups and investigating the potential effects of linguistic distances, this study aimed to improve the interpretations of the bilinguals’ advantages. Measures of inhibition (Flanker, Stroop, Simon task) and switching (Number-letter, Color-Shape, Local-global task) were collected in participants in the ages 50-75 years (n = 193). Despite a large study sample, results did not support any beneficial effects related to improve processing costs in executive functioning. Sub-analyses of the two different language groups (Swedish – Finnish / Swedish – English) intended to investigate the effect of linguistic distances did not change this outcome. Future studies exploring the potential long-term term effects of bilingualism would benefit from identifying tests of cognitive control with greater ecological validity and include other measures of cognitive functioning. Language learning interventions may also be a promising tool for future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
bilingualism, cognitive control, executive functioning, inhibition, switching, linguistic distance, middle age, old age
National Category
Social Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76295 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00269 (DOI)000458281600001 ()2-s2.0-85061378021 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Available from: 2019-10-08 Created: 2019-10-08 Last updated: 2024-03-27Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Hansson, P. & Rönnlund, M. (2016). Blood Pressure Levels and Longitudinal Changes in Relation to Social Network Factors. Psychological Topics, 25(1), 59-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blood Pressure Levels and Longitudinal Changes in Relation to Social Network Factors
2016 (English)In: Psychological Topics, ISSN 1332-0742, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 59-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between social network variables and levels of and longitudinal changes in blood pressure in a middle-aged/older sample. The participants (50-75 years at baseline; n=1097) responded to questions concerning social relationships at baseline and their blood pressure (diastolic, systolic) was measured. Blood pressure levels were reassessed 5, 10, and 15 years later. Latent growth models with responses to questions concerning social relationships as predictors and basic demographic factors (age, sex) as covariates, unexpectedly indicated that a more limited social network (no close friend, few visits, little contact with friends in other ways, not living with someone, and a composite index based on all questions) was associated with significantly lower diastolic blood pressure levels. For systolic blood pressure a similar result was observed for one of the variables (lack of a close friend). In general, these effects diminished over time, as indexed by the positive relationship between several of the social variables and slope. The results were little affected by inclusion of additional covariates (e.g. measures of psychological distress, smoking/alcohol habits, and BMI) suggesting that the origins of this unexpected pattern of findings must probably be sought for in other subjectrelated factors, such as, for example, increased help seeking. Future studies should consider qualitative aspects (e.g. feelings of loneliness, quality of social relationships) in addition to structural aspects to provide a better understanding of these associations.

Keywords
blood pressure, social network, cross-sectional, longitudinal
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78371 (URN)
Available from: 2020-04-06 Created: 2020-04-06 Last updated: 2020-04-14Bibliographically approved
Hansson, P., Eriksson Sörman, D., Bergdahl, J., Bergdahl, M., Nyberg, L., Adolfsson, R. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2014). Dental Status Is Unrelated to Risk of Dementia: A 20-Year Prospective Study [Letter to the editor]. Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, 62(5), 979-981
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dental Status Is Unrelated to Risk of Dementia: A 20-Year Prospective Study
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2014 (English)In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 979-981Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78416 (URN)10.1111/jgs.12814 (DOI)000336385300036 ()24828929 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84900539484 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-04-08 Created: 2020-04-08 Last updated: 2023-09-13Bibliographically approved
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