Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Jalasto, J., Kauppi, P., Luukkonen, R., Lindqvist, A., Langhammer, A., Kankaanranta, H., . . . Piirilä, P. (2022). Mortality in association with occupational exposure and respiratory diagnosis in Helsinki, Finland: a 24-year follow-up. In: Vibeke Backer, Ole Hilberg, Charlotte Ulrik (Ed.), NLC Abstracts: . Paper presented at 50th Nordic Lung Congress (NLC), Copenhagen, Denmark, June 1-3, 2022. Taylor & Francis, 9, Article ID 2058255.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mortality in association with occupational exposure and respiratory diagnosis in Helsinki, Finland: a 24-year follow-up
Show others...
2022 (English)In: NLC Abstracts / [ed] Vibeke Backer, Ole Hilberg, Charlotte Ulrik, Taylor & Francis, 2022, Vol. 9, article id 2058255Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Series
European Clinical Respiratory Journal, E-ISSN 2001-8525 ; sup1
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-90601 (URN)10.1080/20018525.2022.2058255 (DOI)000791605000001 ()
Conference
50th Nordic Lung Congress (NLC), Copenhagen, Denmark, June 1-3, 2022
Available from: 2022-05-11 Created: 2022-05-11 Last updated: 2022-07-05Bibliographically approved
Jalasto, J., Lassmann-Klee, P., Schyllert, C., Luukkonen, R., Meren, M., Larsson, M., . . . Piirilä, P. (2022). Occupation, socioeconomic status and chronic obstructive respiratory diseases – the EpiLung Study in Finland, Estonia and Sweden. Respiratory Medicine, 191, Article ID 106403.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupation, socioeconomic status and chronic obstructive respiratory diseases – the EpiLung Study in Finland, Estonia and Sweden
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 191, article id 106403Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To study occupational groups and occupational exposure in association with chronic obstructive respiratory diseases.

Methods: In early 2000s, structured interviews on chronic respiratory diseases and measurements of lung function as well as fractional expiratory nitric oxide (FENO) were performed in adult random population samples of Finland, Sweden and Estonia. Occupations were categorized according to three classification systems. Occupational exposure to vapours, gases, dusts and fumes (VGDF) was assessed by a Job-Exposure Matrix (JEM). The data from the countries were combined.

Results: COPD, smoking and occupational exposure were most common in Estonia, while asthma and occupations requiring higher educational levels in Sweden and Finland. In an adjusted regression model, non-manual workers had a three-fold risk for physician-diagnosed asthma (OR 3.18, 95%CI 1.07-9.47) compared to professionals and executives, and the risk was two-fold for healthcare & social workers (OR 2.28, 95%CI 1.14-4.59) compared to administration and sales. An increased risk for physician-diagnosed COPD was seen in manual workers, regardless of classification system, but in contrast to asthma, the risk was mostly explained by smoking and less by occupational exposure to VGDF. For FENO, no associations with occupation were observed.

Conclusions: In this multicenter study from Finland, Sweden and Estonia, COPD was consistently associated with manual occupations with high smoking prevalence, highlighting the need to control for tobacco smoking in studies on occupational associations. In contrast, asthma tended to associate with non-manual occupations requiring higher educational levels. The occupational associations with asthma were not driven by eosinophilic inflammation presented by increased FENO.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Asthma, COPD, Fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), occupational exposure, smoking, socioeconomic status
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-84097 (URN)10.1016/j.rmed.2021.106403 (DOI)000748419200017 ()33994287 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85106274754 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Nordic Council of MinistersNordForsk
Note

Validerad;2022;Nivå 2;2022-03-04 (hanlid)

Available from: 2021-05-04 Created: 2021-05-04 Last updated: 2022-03-17Bibliographically approved
Jalasto, J., Kauppi, P., Luukkonen, R., Lindqvist, A., Langhammer, A., Kankaanranta, H., . . . Piirilä, P. (2022). Self-Reported Physician Diagnosed Asthma with COPD is Associated with Higher Mortality than Self-Reported Asthma or COPD Alone – A Prospective 24-Year Study in the Population of Helsinki, Finland. COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 19(1), 226-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-Reported Physician Diagnosed Asthma with COPD is Associated with Higher Mortality than Self-Reported Asthma or COPD Alone – A Prospective 24-Year Study in the Population of Helsinki, Finland
Show others...
2022 (English)In: COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1541-2555, E-ISSN 1541-2563, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 226-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Asthma and COPD are common chronic obstructive respiratory diseases. COPD is associated with increased mortality, but for asthma the results are varying. Their combination has been less investigated, and the results are contradictory. The aim of this prospective study was to observe the overall mortality in obstructive pulmonary diseases and how mortality was related to specific causes using postal questionnaire data. This study included data from 6,062 participants in the FinEsS Helsinki Study (1996) linked to mortality data during a 24-year follow-up. According to self-reported physician diagnosed asthma, COPD, or smoking status, the population was divided into five categories: combined asthma and COPD, COPD alone and asthma alone, ever-smokers without asthma or COPD and never-smokers without asthma or COPD (reference group). For the specific causes of death both the underlying and contributing causes of death were used. Participants with asthma and COPD had the highest hazard of mortality 2.4 (95% CI 1.7–3.5). Ever-smokers without asthma or COPD had a 9.5 (3.7–24.2) subhazard ratio (sHR) related to lower respiratory tract disease specific causes. For asthma, COPD and combined, the corresponding figures were 10.8 (3.4–34.1), 25.0 (8.1–77.4), and 56.1 (19.6–160), respectively. Ever-smokers without asthma or COPD sHR 1.7 (95% CI 1.3–2.5), and participants with combined asthma and COPD 3.5 (1.9–6.3) also featured mortality in association with coronary artery disease. Subjects with combined diseases had the highest hazard of overall mortality and combined diseases also showed the highest hazard of mortality associated with lower respiratory tract causes or coronary artery causes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Asthma, COPD, mortality, prospective study
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-90510 (URN)10.1080/15412555.2022.2061935 (DOI)000787565600001 ()35471091 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85128929253 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NordForsk
Note

Godkänd;2022;Nivå 0;2022-05-04 (joosat);

Available from: 2022-05-04 Created: 2022-05-04 Last updated: 2022-05-12Bibliographically approved
Schyllert, C., Andersson, M., Backman, H., Lindberg, A., Rönmark, E. & Hedman, L. (2021). Childhood onset asthma is associated with lower educational level in young adults – A prospective cohort study. Respiratory Medicine, 186, Article ID 106514.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood onset asthma is associated with lower educational level in young adults – A prospective cohort study
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 186, article id 106514Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Asthma is associated with low socioeconomic status among both children and adults, and adolescents with asthma report more school absenteeism than those without. However, it is unclear whether asthma in childhood and adolescence affects socioeconomic status in adulthood.

Methods

Within the Obstructive Lung disease In Northern Sweden Studies, all children in grade 1 and 2 in three municipalities were invited to a questionnaire survey, 97% participated (n=3430). They were followed annually until age 19, and thereafter at age 28 years. In this study, participants at ages 8y, 12y, 19y and 28y (n=2017) were included. Asthma was categorized into childhood onset (up to age 12y) and adolescent onset (from 12 to 19y). Data for assessment of socioeconomic status was collected at 28y and included educational level, occupation, and occupational exposure to gas, dust and/or fumes (GDF).

Results

Childhood onset asthma was associated with having compulsory school as the highest educational level at age 28y, also after adjustment for sex, smoking and BMI at age 19y and socioeconomic factors in childhood (OR 4.84 95%CI 2.01-11.65), and the pattern was the same among men and women. However, we found no significant associations between asthma in childhood or adolescence and socioeconomic groups, occupational groups or occupational exposure to GDF at age 28y.

Conclusions

Even though asthma in high-income countries, such as Sweden, is well recognised and treated, this study highlight that childhood onset asthma may have a negative long-term effect with regard to educational level in young adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Asthma, Social determinants of health, Occupational exposure, Educational status, Socioeconomic factors
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-86053 (URN)10.1016/j.rmed.2021.106514 (DOI)000698622400004 ()34198167 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85108790578 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy AssociationVårdal FoundationRegion VästerbottenNorrbotten County CouncilVisare Norr
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-07-08 (alebob);

Finansiär: Konsul Th C Berghs Stiftelse; Umeå University

Available from: 2021-06-28 Created: 2021-06-28 Last updated: 2022-03-16Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, M., Ilmarinen, P., Backman, H., Ekerljung, L., Hedman, L., Langhammer, A., . . . Rönmark, E. (2021). Differences in diagnostic patterns of obstructive airway disease between areas and sex in Sweden and Finland: The Nordic EpiLung Study. Journal of Asthma, 58(9), 1196-1207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in diagnostic patterns of obstructive airway disease between areas and sex in Sweden and Finland: The Nordic EpiLung Study
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Journal of Asthma, ISSN 0277-0903, E-ISSN 1532-4303, Vol. 58, no 9, p. 1196-1207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate the current prevalence of physician-diagnosed obstructive airway diseases by respiratory symptoms and by sex in Sweden and Finland. Method: In 2016, a postal questionnaire was answered by 34,072 randomly selected adults in four study areas: Västra Götaland and Norrbotten in Sweden, and Seinäjoki-Vaasa and Helsinki in Finland. Results: The prevalence of asthma symptoms was higher in Norrbotten (13.2%), Seinäjoki-Vaasa (14.8%) and Helsinki (14.4%) than in Västra Götaland (10.7%), and physician-diagnosed asthma was highest in Norrbotten (13.0%) and least in Västra Götaland (10.1%). Chronic productive cough was most common in the Finnish areas (7.7-8.2 % versus 6.3-6.7 %) while the prevalence of physician-diagnosed chronic bronchitis (CB) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) varied between 1.7-2.7% in the four areas. Among individuals with respiratory symptoms, the prevalence of asthma was most common in Norrbotten, while a diagnosis of COPD or CB was most common in Västra Götaland and Seinäjoki-Vaasa. More women than men with respiratory symptoms reported a diagnosis of asthma in Sweden and Seinäjoki-Vaasa but there were no sex differences in Helsinki. In Sweden, more women than men with symptoms of cough or phlegm reported a diagnosis of CB or COPD, while in Finland the opposite was found. Conclusion: The prevalence of respiratory symptoms and corresponding diagnoses varied between and within the countries. The proportion reporting a diagnosis of obstructive airway disease among individuals with respiratory symptoms varied, indicating differences in diagnostic patterns both between areas and by sex.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
asthma, COPD, chronic bronchitis, epidemiology, diagnostic practices, obstructive lung disease, respiratory symptoms, sex differences
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-79247 (URN)10.1080/02770903.2020.1776727 (DOI)000545839200001 ()32475292 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087039697 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NordForskSwedish Heart Lung FoundationNorrbotten County CouncilSwedish Asthma and Allergy AssociationVisare Norr
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-08-17 (alebob);

Forskningsfinansiär: ALF – a regional agreement between Umeå University and Norrbotten County Council; Herman Krefting Foundation for asthma and allergy research; Tampere Tuberculosis Foundation;  Finnish Anti-Tuberculosis Association Foundation; Competitive State Research Financing of the Expert Responsibility Area of Tampere University Hospital; Medical Research Fund of Seinäjoki Central Hospital; Nummela Sanatorium Foundation; Ida Montin Foundation; Helsinki University Central Hospital (TYH 2013354)

Available from: 2020-06-08 Created: 2020-06-08 Last updated: 2021-08-17Bibliographically approved
Räisänen, P., Backman, H., Hedman, L., Andersson, M., Stridsman, C., Kankaanranta, H., . . . Rönmark, E. (2021). High but stable incidence of adult-onset asthma in northern Sweden over the last decades. ERJ Open Research, 7(3), Article ID 00262-2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High but stable incidence of adult-onset asthma in northern Sweden over the last decades
Show others...
2021 (English)In: ERJ Open Research, E-ISSN 2312-0541, Vol. 7, no 3, article id 00262-2021Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The prevalence of asthma has increased both among children and adults during the latter half of the 20th century. The prevalence among adults is affected by the incidence of asthma not only in childhood but also in adulthood. Time trends in asthma incidence have been poorly studied.

Aims: The aim of this study was to review the incidence of adult-onset asthma from 1996 to 2006 and 2006 to 2016 and compare the risk factor patterns.

Methods: In the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies, two randomly selected population-based samples in the 20-69-year age group participated in postal questionnaire surveys about asthma in 1996 (n=7104, 85%) and 2006 (n=6165, 77%). A 10-year follow-up of the two cohorts with the same validated questionnaire was performed, and 5709 and 4552 responded, respectively. Different definitions of population at risk were used in the calculations of asthma incidence. The protocol followed a study performed between 1986 and 1996 in the same area.

Results: The crude incidence rate of physician-diagnosed asthma was 4.4 per 1000 person-years (men 3.8, women 5.5) from 1996 to 2006, and 4.8 per 1000 person-years (men 3.7, women 6.2) from 2006 to 2016. When correcting for possible under-diagnosis at study entry, the incidence rate was 2.4 per 1000 person-years from 1996 to 2006 and 2.6 per 1000 person-years from 2006 to 2016. The incidence rates were similar across age groups. Allergic rhino-conjunctivitis was the main risk factor for incident asthma in both observation periods (risk ratio 2.4-2.6).

Conclusions: The incidence of adult-onset asthma has been stable over the last two decades and has remained at a similar level since the 1980s. The high incidence contributes to the increase in asthma prevalence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Respiratory Society, 2021
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-86682 (URN)10.1183/23120541.00262-2021 (DOI)000684273900035 ()34235212 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85114081266 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy AssociationVisare NorrNorrbotten County Council
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-08-18 (alebob);

Forskningsfinansiär: ALF, a regional agreement between Umeå University and Västerbotten and Norrbotten County Council

Available from: 2021-08-17 Created: 2021-08-17 Last updated: 2022-11-16Bibliographically approved
Andersén, H., Kankaanranta, H., Tuomisto, L. E., Piirilä, P., Sovijärvi, A., Langhammer, A., . . . Ilmarinen, P. (2021). Multimorbidity in Finnish and Swedish speaking Finns; association with daily habits and socioeconomic status - Nordic EpiLung cross-sectional study. Preventive Medicine Reports, 22, Article ID 101338.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multimorbidity in Finnish and Swedish speaking Finns; association with daily habits and socioeconomic status - Nordic EpiLung cross-sectional study
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Preventive Medicine Reports, E-ISSN 2211-3355, Vol. 22, article id 101338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Multimorbidity is an emerging public health priority. This study aims to assess the role of lifestyle and socioeconomic status in the prevalence of multimorbidity and chronic diseases by using two language groups that are part of the same genetic subgroup but differ by daily habits. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2016 with randomly selected population sample with 4173 responders (52.3%) aged 20-69 years in Western Finland. We included 3864 Finnish participants with Swedish (28.1%) or Finnish (71.9%) as a native language. We used a questionnaire to assess participants' chronic diseases and lifestyle. We determined multimorbidity as a disease count ≥2.

Finnish speakers were more likely to have a diagnosis of COPD, heart failure, diabetes, reflux disease, chronic kidney failure, and painful conditions than Swedish speakers. The prevalence of multimorbidity was higher for Finnish speakers in the age group of 60-69 years (41.0% vs. 32.0%, p=0.018) than Swedish speakers. A higher proportion of Finnish speakers smoked, were obese, inactive, and had lower socioeconomic status compared to Swedish speakers. All these factors, in addition to age and female sex, were significant risk factors for multimorbidity. Prevalence of multimorbidity was different in two language groups living in the same area and was associated with differences in lifestyle factors such as smoking, physical inactivity and obesity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Multimorbidity, Risk factors, Health disparities, COPD, Obesity
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-83087 (URN)10.1016/j.pmedr.2021.101338 (DOI)000659961900041 ()33732608 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85103260737 (Scopus ID)
Note

Godkänd;2021;Nivå 0;2021-03-22 (alebob);

Finansiär: Tampere Tuberculosis Foundation; The Finnish Anti-Tuberculosis Association Foundation; The Research Foundation of The Pulmonary Diseases; The Competitive State Research Financing of the Expert Responsibility Area of Tampere University Hospital; The Medical Research Fund of Seinäjoki Central Hospital

Available from: 2021-02-26 Created: 2021-02-26 Last updated: 2022-01-10Bibliographically approved
Backman, H., Lindmark, S. W., Hedman, L., Warm, K., Myrberg, T., Stridsman, C., . . . Rönmark, E. (2021). Obesity and inflammatory markers in adult-onset asthma. Paper presented at ERS International Congress 2021, Barcelona, Spain, September 4-8, 2021. European Respiratory Journal, 58(65), Article ID OA4215.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obesity and inflammatory markers in adult-onset asthma
Show others...
2021 (English)In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 58, no 65, article id OA4215Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Respiratory Society (ERS), 2021
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-89651 (URN)10.1183/13993003.congress-2021.OA4215 (DOI)000747452101108 ()
Conference
ERS International Congress 2021, Barcelona, Spain, September 4-8, 2021
Note

Godkänd;2022;Nivå 0;2022-03-31 (hanlid)

Available from: 2022-03-31 Created: 2022-03-31 Last updated: 2022-03-31Bibliographically approved
Allinson, J., Afzal, S., Colak, Y., Backman, H., Van Den Berghe, M., Boezen, M., . . . Vanfleteren, L. (2020). Collating data from major European population studies – The CADSET (Chronic airway disease early stratification) clinical research collaboration. Paper presented at ERS International Congress, 6-9 September, 2020, Virtual. European Respiratory Journal, 56(Suppl 64), Article ID 3757.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collating data from major European population studies – The CADSET (Chronic airway disease early stratification) clinical research collaboration
Show others...
2020 (English)In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 56, no Suppl 64, article id 3757Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: European population cohorts continue to expand our understanding of chronic airways disease and inter-study collaboration may help address the inevitable limitations of study size, duration, era and geography. Towards this aim, CADSET has collated data from ten major general population European cohorts: Asklepios; Copenhagen City Heart Study; Copenhagen General Population Study; ECRHS; HUNT; LEAD; Lifelines, OLIN, Rotterdam Study and WSAS. We included males and females aged 20 to 95 years with baseline demographic and spirometry data.

Results: Data from 262,829 individuals (44% male) from multiple European countries provided good coverage across all adult ages (Fig.1A). Recruitment occurred in every year from 1976 through 2020. 23% were current-smokers and 42% were never-smokers, a pattern varying with advancing age (Fig.1B). The prevalence of airflow limitation varied according to whether lower limit of normal (LLN) or <0.70 thresholds were applied, increasing with age if the latter was used (Fig.1C).

Interpretation: These results fit with previous reports, however the size, geographical reach and span of recruitment provided by this collaboration provides a unique opportunity to explore chronic airways disease development. Together, we are now pursuing research questions previously beyond the scope of individual cohort studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Respiratory Society (ERS), 2020
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-82893 (URN)10.1183/13993003.congress-2020.3757 (DOI)000606501407159 ()
Conference
ERS International Congress, 6-9 September, 2020, Virtual
Note

Godkänd;2021;Nivå 0;2021-02-11 (alebob)

Available from: 2021-02-11 Created: 2021-02-11 Last updated: 2023-11-22Bibliographically approved
Backman, H., Lindberg, A., Hedman, L., Stridsman, C., Jansson, S.-A., Sandström, T., . . . Rönmark, E. (2020). FEV1 decline in relation to blood eosinophils and neutrophils in a population-based asthma cohort. World Allergy Organization Journal, 13(3), Article ID 100110.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>FEV1 decline in relation to blood eosinophils and neutrophils in a population-based asthma cohort
Show others...
2020 (English)In: World Allergy Organization Journal, ISSN 1731-3317, E-ISSN 1939-4551, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 100110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The relationship between lung function decline and eosinophils and neutrophils has important therapeutic implications among asthmatics, but it has rarely been studied in large cohort studies.

Objective

The aim is to study the relationship between blood eosinophils and neutrophils and FEV1 decline in a long-term follow-up of a population-based adult asthma cohort.

Methods

In 2012–2014, an adult asthma cohort was invited to a follow-up including spirometry, blood sampling, and structured interviews, and n = 892 participated (55% women, mean age 59 y, 32–92 y). Blood eosinophils, neutrophils and FEV 1 decline were analyzed both as continuous variables and divided into categories with different cut-offs. Regression models adjusted for smoking, exposure to vapors, gas, dust, or fumes (VGDF), use of inhaled and oral corticosteroids, and other possible confounders were utilized to analyze the relationship between eosinophils and neutrophils at follow-up and FEV1 decline.

Results

The mean follow-up time was 18 years, and the mean FEV 1 decline was 27 ml/year. The annual FEV1 decline was related to higher levels of both blood eosinophils and neutrophils at follow-up, but only the association with eosinophils remained when adjusted for confounders. Further, the association between FEV1 decline and eosinophils was stronger among those using ICS. With EOS <0.3 × 109/L as reference, a more rapid decline in FEV1 was independently related to EOS ≥0.4 × 109/L in adjusted analyses.

Conclusions and clinical relevance

Besides emphasizing the importance of smoking cessation and reduction of other harmful exposures, our real-world results indicate that there is an independent relationship between blood eosinophils and FEV1 decline among adults with asthma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Asthma, FEV1, Eosinophils, Neutrophils, Cohort
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-78305 (URN)10.1016/j.waojou.2020.100110 (DOI)000528838100007 ()32206161 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85081702790 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-04-03 (alebob)

Available from: 2020-04-02 Created: 2020-04-02 Last updated: 2022-11-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0553-8067

Search in DiVA

Show all publications