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Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Östersjö, S. & Nguyen, T. T. (2019). Arrival Cities: Hanoi. In: Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells. (Ed.), Voices, Bodies, Practices: Performing Musical Subjectivities (pp. 235-294). Leuven: Leuven University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arrival Cities: Hanoi
2019 (English)In: Voices, Bodies, Practices: Performing Musical Subjectivities / [ed] Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells., Leuven: Leuven University Press , 2019, p. 235-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter outlines the role of subjectivity and intersubjectivity in the creation of Arrival Cities: Hanoi, a piece of experimental music theatre with documentary film. The piece seeks a new format for politically informed theatre which is responsive to the challenges of a globalized society. A central concept for the dramaturgy was to make the individual memories of the performers a cornerstone for each situation. Hence, similarly to how the script in verbatim theatre is drawn from interviews with people’s experience of a real-life situation (Forsyth & Megson, 2009), the dramaturgy emerged, as it were, from the creation of situations that would evoke the lived experience of the performers. The stage is set up so that the three performers either play their instruments or tell stories in a position at the front of the stage, where three microphones on stands are placed. The storytelling was developed from memories of encounters with people in migration zones in Hanoi, but would even more draw on personal memories from the city.

Arrival Cities: Hanoi aims to create a space where the boundary between fiction and documentary is dissolved.  While it has been essential to remain in what the performers perceive as the authentic experience in the storytelling, the audience cannot really know whether the stories told by the performers are authentic experiences or scripted dialogues. In  the piece, the documentary material forms part of a multi-layered narrative, without laying out the footage as a documentation. The storytelling places the performers on stage as individuals rather than as actors, an approach which is essential to the political aims with the production. This presence in the moment of performance accompanies the images of the street vendors and other people in the documentary.

Empathy and the sharing of individual life stories became the central nodes in the making of Arrival Cities: Hanoi. It is a piece of music theatre without a script, but with a musical and dramaturgical structure. The role of the documentary is manifold. It is a means for a political engagement but also creates memories and images that can be shared and transformed in the performance. Intercultural music and theatre operate in a liminal space between traditions. Aesthetic choices are therefore difficult to negotiate. Without trust and empathy, these negotiations cannot reach beyond the surface. Intercultural collaboration always demands from each individual to give up a piece of the self. In ArrivalCities: Hanoi, composer, director, and performers were all engaged in such learning processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2019
Series
Orpheus Institute Series
Keywords
intercultural collaboration, performative ethnography, empathy, ethics, music theatre
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Musical Performance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75523 (URN)10.2307/j.ctvmd83kv.9 (DOI)9789462702059 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-14 Created: 2019-08-14 Last updated: 2020-02-17Bibliographically approved
Östersjö, S. & Gorton, D. (2019). Austerity Measures I: performing the discursive voice. In: Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells. (Ed.), Voices, Bodies, Practices: Performing Musical Subjectivities (pp. 29-82). Leuven: Leuven University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Austerity Measures I: performing the discursive voice
2019 (English)In: Voices, Bodies, Practices: Performing Musical Subjectivities / [ed] Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells., Leuven: Leuven University Press , 2019, p. 29-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter approaches the question of subjectivity in the musical practice of composer and performer through a discussion of the emergence of ‘voice’. Part 1 describes a theoretical model by which the subjectivities of performer and composer can be understood in terms of this emergence, arguing that a musician’s ‘voice’ is continually defined through interaction with cultural and psychological tools, such as scores, compositional systems, and musical instruments. These ‘voices’ are explored through the ways they combine within a collaboration to form a ‘discursive voice’. Part 2 presents an analysis of four video recordings made of Austerity Measures I for ten-string guitar by David Gorton, performed by Stefan Östersjö at the ORCiM Research Festival in 2014. This composition requires the solo guitar player to cut materials away across a series of repetitions, replacing them with silence. The analysis draws on quantitative measures of timing and performer movements, and qualitative measures of perceived phrasing structures and performance gestures. While each of these analytical methods alone provides some insight into the performance strategies in the recordings, in the shaping of phrases as materials are cut away, and the structural significance of bodily movement, a much richer understanding is sought through their combination. In doing so the analysis aims to shed light on the interrelations between the embodied knowledge of the performer and the musical structures in the score, and further, between the subjectivities of composer and performer unfolded through the composition and performance of Austerity Measures I. Ultimately this chapter aims to provide analytical evidence for the ‘discursive voice’ within the artistic practice of the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2019
Series
Orpheus Institute Series
Keywords
voice, subjectivity, musical gesture, musical expression
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Musical Performance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75443 (URN)10.2307/j.ctvmd83kv.6 (DOI)9789462702059 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2020-02-17Bibliographically approved
(2019). Devil's Water: audio and video installation. Newcastle
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Devil's Water: audio and video installation
2019 (English)Artistic output (Unrefereed)
Abstract [en]

Devil’s Water is a piece of ecological sound art recorded by Bennett Hogg and Stefan Östersjö at Devil's Water, Northumbria, 21-22 Maj 2013. On site, Hogg and Östersjö built a sculpture of a guitar placed in a tree, strung with fishing line to trees down by the shore. The recordings feature Hogg playing violins, bowed by sinking the body into the current, and Östersjö performing on the guitar-violin-tree sculpture. Mixed and edited at The Music Studiosand at Culture Lab, University of Newcastle.  The video was created by Merrie Snell, using documentary footage from 2013 as well as additional shootings made with Hogg and Östersjö at Devil's water in August 2016. A first film version was premiered at Panora cinema, during the Transistor Festival in Malmö in May 2017. This audio and video installation, using the same material, was premiered at Cheeseburn Sculpture Gardens, and screened in the Chapel on June 29-30 2019.

The production of the soundscape recording in 2013 was carried out by Hogg and Östersjö within a two year artistic research project with The Landscape Quartet, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, headed by University of Newcastle. A DVD with the film version of the piece will be released in the Orpheus Institute series, Leuven Univertsity Press in 2020. 

Place, publisher, year, pages
Newcastle: , 2019
Keywords
ecological sound art, soundscape, composition, video installation
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Musical Performance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75153 (URN)
Note

Godkänd;2019;Nivå 0;2020-01-09 (svasva)

Available from: 2019-06-30 Created: 2019-06-30 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Östersjö, S., Brooks, W. & Wells, J. (2019). Footnotes. In: Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells. (Ed.), Voices, Bodies, Practices: Performing Musical Subjectivities. Leuven: Leuven University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Footnotes
2019 (English)In: Voices, Bodies, Practices: Performing Musical Subjectivities / [ed] Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells., Leuven: Leuven University Press , 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter discusses the agencies of composer, performer and sound engineer respectively, and further of non-human agents such as score, instruments (widely defined), the concept of authenticity in the making of the premiere recording of William Brooks composition entitled Footnotes, composed  between 1983 and 1985, but never performed in its entirety before this recording by Stefan Östersjö. With the collaboration of Jez Wells, sound engineer, and William Brooks, a 45-minute LP was produced which aim to reconstruct the historical sound of certain musicians and recording technologies. The entire working process was documented on video and analysed using qualitative research methods. Early in their work it became evident to the three collaborators that the overall project required the construction of a set of different identities for six types of participant: guitar, guitarist; score, composer; hardware, engineer. This chapter—itself an intertangled multilogue of mutable voices—traces the construction of, distinction between, and eventual representation of, those identities in the final recordings, but most of all, through an analysis of the extended collaborative process.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2019
Series
Orpheus Institute Series
Keywords
audio engineering, authenticity, musical interpretation, historical musicology, voice
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Musical Performance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75450 (URN)9789462702059 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-14 Created: 2019-08-14 Last updated: 2020-02-04Bibliographically approved
(2019). Invisible Sounds: Piteå Port.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invisible Sounds: Piteå Port
2019 (English)Artistic output (Refereed)
Keywords
ecological sound art, soundscape, composition, electronic music
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Musical Performance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75091 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 1;2020-01-09 (svasva)

Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Östersjö, S., Dahlqvist, J. & Lindwall, C. (2019). Topography of the (One): Reflections on Musical Time in Composition and Performance (1ed.). In: Paulo de Assis and Paolo Giudici (Ed.), Aberrant Nuptials: Deleuze and Artistic Research. Leuven: Leuven University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Topography of the (One): Reflections on Musical Time in Composition and Performance
2019 (English)In: Aberrant Nuptials: Deleuze and Artistic Research / [ed] Paulo de Assis and Paolo Giudici, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2019, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter discusses a composition for eleven-stringed alto guitar by the Swedish composer Christer Lindwall. Titled Topography of the (One), this piece may be understood as a meta-composition that reflects on the pre-conditions—both material and philosophical—for its stages of becoming. It thereby holds a special place in the compositional output of Lindwall, whose work has, since the late 1980s, been associated with the practices of New Complexity—composers such as Brian Ferneyhough and Richard Barrett. The conceptual nature of this composition, and its direct quotations from a series of contemporary French philosophers launched an interpretative process that led to a staging that would—as Steven Schick wrote in his discussion of the process of learning Ferneyhough’s Bone Alphabet—“shape and make inevitable an interpretive context which steers the piece in performance” (Schick 1994, 133). The first performance was to take place in a production titled “Words and Music” during the Transistor Festival in Malmö, Sweden, curated by the Swedish playwright and director Jörgen Dahlqvist. A dialogue was launched between Östersjö and Dahlqvist that resulted in a staging that focused entirely on the creation of a sonic framework for the performance. The dramaturgical means were the addition of electronic sound, first by the creation of an introductory tape part, and, second, by doubling up the recited fragments with sampled voice of the same performer, also creating a sonic questioning of the unity of the “one.”[1]The compositional strategies, launched by the composer’s philosophical reflections, in turn become the source for a series of observations regarding musical time, which we address by returning to Deleuze’s writing in Difference and Repetition(1994). 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Orpheus Institute Series
Keywords
musical time, music philosophy, new complexity, difference, repetition
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Musical Performance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-75439 (URN)9789462702028 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2020-02-04Bibliographically approved
Östersjö, S. (2018). Musical and Musicianly Listening in Intercultural Practice. Circuits: Musiques Contemporaines, 28(1), 35-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Musical and Musicianly Listening in Intercultural Practice
2018 (English)In: Circuits: Musiques Contemporaines, ISSN 1183-1693, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 35-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses the function of listening in intercultural musical collaboration, with reference to a number of examples taken from the author’s practice, within the Vietnamese/Swedish group The Six Tones. Through the lens of Pierre Schaeffer’s concepts of musical and musicianly listening, the paper suggests that inter-cultural exchange takes place in a liminal field between traditions. This demands a particular openness which can be developed by operating musicianly listening, a form of listening which actively seeks to “innovate in the facture of sound objects

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Montreal: Presses de l'Université de Montréal, 2018
Keywords
listening, intercultural, habitus, collaborative artistic practice, traditional music, experimental music
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71142 (URN)
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
Östersjö, S., Clarke, E., Doffman, M. & Gorton, D. (2017). Fluid practices, solid roles?: The Evolution of Forlorn Hope. In: Eric Clarke and Mark Doffman (Ed.), Distributed Creativity: Collaboration and Improvisation in Contemporary Music (pp. 116-135). rd: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fluid practices, solid roles?: The Evolution of Forlorn Hope
2017 (English)In: Distributed Creativity: Collaboration and Improvisation in Contemporary Music / [ed] Eric Clarke and Mark Doffman, rd: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 116-135Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter investigates the relationship between the fluid practices that frequently characterize the work of contemporary musicians, and the more solid roles of performer and composer that continue to hold sway in contemporary music. Focusing on a case study of the collaborative creation of Forlorn Hope for eleven-string alto guitar and electronics, by Gorton and Östersjö, the chapter analyses the processes that lead from research and experimentation with particular guitar tunings and playing techniques, through a more conventionally compositional phase, to the first public performance of the piece. The chapter demonstrates how the affordances of both the instrument in the hands of Östersjö and the particular tuning specified by Gorton combined with improvised discoveries, and the ‘filtering’ force of a piece by Dowland, result in a piece whose creative ecology is distributed across a variety of timescales and practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
rd: Oxford University Press, 2017
Series
Studies in Musical Performance as Creative Practice
Keywords
musical practices, musical roles, collaboration, distribution, tuning system Dowland, Music Theory and Analysis
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Music
Research subject
Musical Performance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71146 (URN)10.1093/oso/9780199355914.003.0009 (DOI)978-0-19-935594-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Östersjö, S. & Crispin, D. (2017). Musical Expression from Conception to Reception. In: John Rink, Helena Gaunt and Aaron Williamon (Ed.), Musicians in the Making: Pathways to Creative Performance (pp. 288-305). Oxford: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Musical Expression from Conception to Reception
2017 (English)In: Musicians in the Making: Pathways to Creative Performance / [ed] John Rink, Helena Gaunt and Aaron Williamon, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 288-305Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The word ‘expression’, when applied to music, has a comfortably familiar ring to it. However, on careful scrutiny it turns out to be more elusive than one might think. Intrinsic to musical expression is the idea that within music there is something to be expressed, and that this might be reinforced (or undermined) by the performance strategies adopted. The issue becomes more complicated when one asks whether the ‘something’ in question equates to inchoate feeling, to apprehensible meaning or to both in variable proportions. This chapter reviews historical approaches to musical expression and argues that the concept of Werktreue still shapes much of our thinking and teaching in this area. This leads to a consideration of the respective roles of composer, performer and audience, generating a diagrammatic matrix which is progressively modified throughout the chapter. In its final, most dynamic version, the matrix proposes a ‘field of musical expression’ in which the roles of composer, performer and listener interact. The authors suggest that the time is ripe for more interdisciplinary research on musical expression, where a fusion of approaches—from music psychology and computing to performance studies and artistic research—may be the key to a deeper understanding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017
Series
Studies in Musical Performance as Creative Practice
Keywords
musical expression, interpretation, Werktreue, deviation, GERMS model, shape, gesture, expression field model
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Music
Research subject
Musical Performance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71144 (URN)10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199346677.003.0021 (DOI)9780199346677 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2020-02-04Bibliographically approved
Östersjö, S. (2017). Thinking-through-Music: On Knowledge Production, Materiality, Embodiment, and Subjectivity in Artistic Research. In: Jonathan Impett (Ed.), Artistic Research In Music: Discipline and Resistance (pp. 88-107). Leuven: Leuven University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thinking-through-Music: On Knowledge Production, Materiality, Embodiment, and Subjectivity in Artistic Research
2017 (English)In: Artistic Research In Music: Discipline and Resistance / [ed] Jonathan Impett, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2017, p. 88-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Artistic research in music is now at a generational stage of development. How should it deal with its own maturing? From a kaleidoscope of individual pursuits, ethos and methodologies have emerged to encompass more distributed approaches. This transformation has taken place in parallel with changes in the dynamics and structures of culture, its institutions and constituencies. Artistic research maintains a productive dialectic between its potential status as discipline or as practice. It has developed topoi, tropes and its own canon of cases, texts and figures. How does it negotiate relationships with institutions, disciplines and bodies of theory while retaining the critical perspective of the artist?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2017
Series
The Orpheus Institute Series
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Music
Research subject
Musical Performance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71147 (URN)9789462700901 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2020-02-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4704-5420

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