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Sravan, J. S., Matsakas, L. & Sarkar, O. (2024). Advances in Biological Wastewater Treatment Processes: Focus on Low-Carbon Energy and Resource Recovery in Biorefinery Context. Bioengineering, 11(3), Article ID 281.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advances in Biological Wastewater Treatment Processes: Focus on Low-Carbon Energy and Resource Recovery in Biorefinery Context
2024 (English)In: Bioengineering, E-ISSN 2306-5354, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 281Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Advancements in biological wastewater treatment with sustainable and circularity approaches have a wide scope of application. Biological wastewater treatment is widely used to remove/recover organic pollutants and nutrients from a diverse wastewater spectrum. However, conventional biological processes face challenges, such as low efficiency, high energy consumption, and the generation of excess sludge. To overcome these limitations, integrated strategies that combine biological treatment with other physical, chemical, or biological methods have been developed and applied in recent years. This review emphasizes the recent advances in integrated strategies for biological wastewater treatment, focusing on their mechanisms, benefits, challenges, and prospects. The review also discusses the potential applications of integrated strategies for diverse wastewater treatment towards green energy and resource recovery, along with low-carbon fuel production. Biological treatment methods, viz., bioremediation, electro-coagulation, electro-flocculation, electro-Fenton, advanced oxidation, electro-oxidation, bioelectrochemical systems, and photo-remediation, are summarized with respect to non-genetically modified metabolic reactions. Different conducting materials (CMs) play a significant role in mass/charge transfer metabolic processes and aid in enhancing fermentation rates. Carbon, metal, and nano-based CMs hybridization in different processes provide favorable conditions to the fermentative biocatalyst and trigger their activity towards overcoming the limitations of the conventional process. The emerging field of nanotechnology provides novel additional opportunities to surmount the constraints of conventional process for enhanced waste remediation and resource valorization. Holistically, integrated strategies are promising alternatives for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of biological wastewater treatment while also contributing to the circular economy and environmental protection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), 2024
Keywords
bioelectrochemical treatment, circular economy, low carbon, resource recovery, sustainable development goals, waste biorefinery
National Category
Water Treatment Water Engineering
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-104937 (URN)10.3390/bioengineering11030281 (DOI)001191377100001 ()2-s2.0-85188700322 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2024;Nivå 2;2024-04-02 (marisr);

Full text license: CC BY

Available from: 2024-04-02 Created: 2024-04-02 Last updated: 2024-04-02Bibliographically approved
Sarkar, O., Antonopoulou, I., Xiros, C., Bruce, Y., Souadkia, S., Rova, U., . . . Matsakas, L. (2024). Carbonic anhydrase assisted acidogenic fermentation of forest residues for low carbon hydrogen and volatile fatty acid production: enhanced in situ CO2 reduction and microbiological analysis. Green Chemistry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbonic anhydrase assisted acidogenic fermentation of forest residues for low carbon hydrogen and volatile fatty acid production: enhanced in situ CO2 reduction and microbiological analysis
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2024 (English)In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is considered an efficient enzyme for fermentation systems exhibiting a wide range of applications, enhancing both the efficacy and output of the fermentation process. The present study aimed to evaluate the production of acidogenic biohydrogen (bioH2) and volatile fatty acids (VFA) using forest residues as a renewable feedstock. Specifically, the study examined the integration of CA derived from Desulfovibrio vulgaris into the acidogenic fermentation (AF) process. The experimental procedure involved a cascade design conducted in two distinct phases. In phase I, the concentration of CA in the AF was systematically optimized, with glucose serving as the substrate. In phase II, three influential parameters (pH, pressurization with in situ generated gas and organic load) were evaluated on AF in association with optimized CA concentration from phase I. In phase II, glucose was replaced with renewable sugars obtained from forest residues after steam explosion pretreatment followed by enzymatic saccharification. The incorporation of CA in AF was found to be beneficial in steering acidogenic metabolites. Alkaline conditions (pH 8) promoted bioH2, yielding 210.9 mLH2 gCOD−1, while introducing CA further increased output to 266.6 mLH2 gCOD−1. This enzymatic intervention improved the production of bioH2 conversion efficiency (HCE) from 45.3% to 57.2%. Pressurizing the system accelerated VFA production with complete utilization of in situ produced H2 + CO2 compared to non-pressurized systems. Particularly, caproic acid production was improved under pressurized conditions which was accomplished by the targeted enrichment of chain-elongating bacteria in the mixed culture. The microbial diversity analysis showed the dominance of Firmicutes suggesting a significant degree of adaptation to the experimental contexts, leading to an enhanced production of acidogenic metabolites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2024
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering; Centre - Bio4Energy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-105210 (URN)10.1039/d4gc00044g (DOI)2-s2.0-85190449731 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funder: Bio4Energy (B4E3-FM-1-10);

Full text license: CC BY

Available from: 2024-04-23 Created: 2024-04-23 Last updated: 2024-04-23
Chang, Y.-C., Venkateswar Reddy, M., Suzuki, H., Terayama, T., Mawatari, Y., Seki, C. & Sarkar, O. (2024). Characterization of Ralstonia insidiosa C1 isolated from Alpine regions: Capability in polyhydroxyalkanoates degradation and production. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 471, Article ID 134348.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of Ralstonia insidiosa C1 isolated from Alpine regions: Capability in polyhydroxyalkanoates degradation and production
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 471, article id 134348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2024
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-105403 (URN)10.1016/j.jhazmat.2024.134348 (DOI)38653138 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85190816571 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2024;Nivå 2;2024-05-08 (joosat);

Funder: Japan Science and Technology Agency (VP29117937927); JSPS KAKENHI (24K11471); Ogasawara Foundation for the Promotion of Science and Engineering;

Available from: 2024-05-08 Created: 2024-05-08 Last updated: 2024-05-08Bibliographically approved
Sarkar, O., Rova, U., Christakopoulos, P. & Matsakas, L. (2024). Continuous biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids production from cheese whey in a tubular biofilm reactor: Substrate flow rate variations and microbial dynamics. International journal of hydrogen energy, 59, 1305-1316
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuous biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids production from cheese whey in a tubular biofilm reactor: Substrate flow rate variations and microbial dynamics
2024 (English)In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487, Vol. 59, p. 1305-1316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Three tubular bioreactors with a varied substrate flow rate of (2 mL/min, 5 mL/min, and 8 mL/min) were examined for 75 days. At 8 mL/min flow rate, the biohydrogen evolution was higher (3.88 mL H2/h), while its conversion efficiency was lower compared to 5 and 2 mL/min flow rate. The formation of volatile fatty acids and ammonium was also influenced by substrate flow rates. The volatile fatty acids production was slightly higher at 2 mL/min (12.74 ± 2.42 gCOD/L) and 5 mL/min (18.09 ± 2.01 gCOD/L) while, decreasing at 8 mL/min (11.85 ± 0.78 gCOD/L). Substrate flow rate significantly affected the pattern and composition of volatile fatty acids showing higher acetic acid, butyric and propionic acid production of 4.72 ± 1.46 gCOD/L (2 mL/min) 10.41 ± 0.91 gCOD/L (5 mL/min) and 1.78 ± 0.13 gCOD/L (5 mL/min). Continuous substrate input maintained the pH in the reactor due to replacement with fresh substrate, thereby controlling feedback inhibition and boosting metabolite production. Hydrogen-producing Firmicutes on the biofilm confirmed the pivotal role of the microbial community's significant contribution to converting waste to bioenergy. Overall, the present results support the use of a continuous operation mode for large-scale biohydrogen production. However, to ensure the efficacy of the system using waste or wastewater, low substrate flow rates are recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Biofilm reactor, Biohydrogen, Cheese whey, Continuous mode operation, Volatile fatty acids
National Category
Microbiology Bioenergy
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-104881 (URN)10.1016/j.ijhydene.2024.02.041 (DOI)001188002700001 ()2-s2.0-85187269273 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2024;Nivå 2;2024-04-05 (marisr);

Full text license: CC BY

Available from: 2024-03-26 Created: 2024-03-26 Last updated: 2024-04-05Bibliographically approved
Iragavarapu, G. P., Imam, S. S., Sarkar, O., Mohan, S. V., Chang, Y.-C., Reddy, M. V., . . . Amradi, N. K. (2023). Bioprocessing of Waste for Renewable Chemicals and Fuels to Promote Bioeconomy. Energies, 16(9), Article ID 3873.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioprocessing of Waste for Renewable Chemicals and Fuels to Promote Bioeconomy
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2023 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 16, no 9, article id 3873Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The world’s rising energy needs, and the depletion of fossil resources demand a shift from fossil-based feedstocks to organic waste to develop a competitive, resource-efficient, and low-carbon sustainable economy in the long run. It is well known that the production of fuels and chemicals via chemical routes is advantageous because it is a well-established technology with low production costs. However, the use of toxic/environmentally harmful and expensive catalysts generates toxic intermediates, making the process unsustainable. Alternatively, utilization of renewable resources for bioprocessing with a multi-product approach that aligns novel integration improves resource utilization and contributes to the “green economy”. The present review discusses organic waste bioprocessing through the anaerobic fermentation (AF) process to produce biohydrogen (H2), biomethane (CH4), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and medium chain fatty acids (MCFA). Furthermore, the roles of photosynthetic bacteria and microalgae for biofuel production are discussed. In addition, a roadmap to create a fermentative biorefinery approach in the framework of an AF-integrated bioprocessing format is deliberated, along with limitations and future scope. This novel bioprocessing approach significantly contributes to promoting the circular bioeconomy by launching complete carbon turnover practices in accordance with sustainable development goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
organic waste, biomethane, biohydrogen, waste biorefinery, volatile fatty acids
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-97643 (URN)10.3390/en16093873 (DOI)000987068100001 ()2-s2.0-85159303085 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-05-29 (joosat);

Licens fulltext: CC BY License

Available from: 2023-05-29 Created: 2023-05-29 Last updated: 2023-05-29Bibliographically approved
Mohanakrishna, G., Sneha, N. P., Rafi, S. M. & Sarkar, O. (2023). Dark fermentative hydrogen production: Potential of food waste as future energy needs. Science of the Total Environment, 888, Article ID 163801.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dark fermentative hydrogen production: Potential of food waste as future energy needs
2023 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 888, article id 163801Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Globally, food waste (FW) is found to be one of the major constituents creating several hurdles in waste management. On the other hand, the energy crisis is increasing and the limited fossil fuel resources available are not sufficient for energy needed for emerging population. In this context, biohydrogen production approach through valorization of FW is emerging as one of the sustainable and eco-friendly options. The present review explores FW sources, characteristics, and dark fermentative production of hydrogen along with its efficiency. FW are highly biodegradable and rich in carbohydrates which can be efficiently utilized by anaerobic bacteria. Based on the composition of FW, several pretreatment methods can be adapted to improve the bioavailability of the organics. By-products of dark fermentation are organic acids that can be integrated with several secondary bioprocesses. The versatility of secondary products is ranging from energy generation to biochemicals production. Integrated approaches facilitate in enhanced energy harvesting along with extended wastewater treatment. The review also discusses various parameters like pH, temperature, hydraulic retention time and nutrient supplementation to enhance the process efficiency of biohydrogen production. The application of solid-state fermentation (SSF) in dark fermentation improves the process efficiency. Dark fermentation as the key process for valorization and additional energy generating process can make FW the most suitable substrate for circular economy and waste based biorefinery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Waste to bioenergy, Biorefinery, Food waste, Pilot scale studies, Dark fermentation
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-97341 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.163801 (DOI)001024730000001 ()37127164 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159628894 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-05-24 (joosat);

Part of special issue: Sustainable environment and bioeconomic perspective through valorization of waste biomass from agri-food systems. Edited by Prakash Kumar Sarangi, Yusuf Chisti, Pravakar Mohanty, Vikram Pattarkine, Jigisha K. Parikh, Antonio Oliveira.

Available from: 2023-05-24 Created: 2023-05-24 Last updated: 2024-03-07Bibliographically approved
Saito, K., Reddy, M. V., Sarkar, O., Kumar, A. N., Choi, D. & Chang, Y.-C. (2023). Quantification of the Monomer Compositions of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) and Poly(3-hydroxyvalerate) by Alkaline Hydrolysis and Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. Bioengineering, 10(5), Article ID 618.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification of the Monomer Compositions of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) and Poly(3-hydroxyvalerate) by Alkaline Hydrolysis and Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography
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2023 (English)In: Bioengineering, E-ISSN 2306-5354, Vol. 10, no 5, article id 618Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the growing interest in bioplastics, there is an urgent need to develop rapid analysis methods linked to production technology development. This study focused on the production of a commercially non-available homopolymer, poly(3-hydroxyvalerate) (P(3HV)), and a commercially available copolymer, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (P(3HB-co-3HV)), through fermentation using two different bacterial strains. The bacteria Chromobacterium violaceum and Bacillus sp. CYR1 were used to produce P(3HV) and P(3HB-co-3HV), respectively. The bacterium Bacillus sp. CYR1 produced 415 mg/L of P(3HB-co-3HV) when incubated with acetic acid and valeric acid as the carbon sources, whereas the bacterium C. violaceum produced 0.198 g of P(3HV)/g dry biomass when incubated with sodium valerate as the carbon source. Additionally, we developed a fast, simple, and inexpensive method to quantify P(3HV) and P(3HB-co-3HV) using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). As the alkaline decomposition of P(3HB-co-3HV) releases 2-butenoic acid (2BE) and 2-pentenoic acid (2PE), we were able to determine the concentration using HPLC. Moreover, calibration curves were prepared using standard 2BE and 2PE, along with sample 2BE and 2PE produced by the alkaline decomposition of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and P(3HV), respectively. Finally, the HPLC results obtained by our new method were compared using gas chromatography (GC) analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mdpi, 2023
Keywords
chromatography, crotonic acid, homopolymer, copolymer, polyhydroxyalkanoate, poly(3-hydroxyvalerate)
National Category
Polymer Technologies
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-98009 (URN)10.3390/bioengineering10050618 (DOI)000995531400001 ()37237688 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160729309 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-06-08 (joosat);

Funder: Japan Science and Technology Agency (VP29117937927); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) (P15352); Ogasawara Foundation for the Promotion of Science Engineering;

Part of Special Issue: Advances in Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Production, Volume 4

Licens fulltext: CC BY License

Available from: 2023-06-08 Created: 2023-06-08 Last updated: 2023-10-11Bibliographically approved
Sarkar, O., Matsakas, L., Rova, U. & Christakopoulos, P. (2023). Ultrasound-controlled acidogenic valorization of wastewater for biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids production: Microbial community profiling. iScience, 26(4), Article ID 106519.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ultrasound-controlled acidogenic valorization of wastewater for biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids production: Microbial community profiling
2023 (English)In: iScience, E-ISSN 2589-0042, Vol. 26, no 4, article id 106519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study explored the influence of ultrasound on acidogenic fermentation of wastewater for the production of biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids/carboxylic acids. Eight sono-bioreactors underwent ultrasound (20 kHz: 2W and 4W), with an ultrasound duration ranging from 15 min to 30 days, and the formation of acidogenic metabolites. Long-term continuous ultrasonication enhanced biohydrogen and volatile fatty acid production. Specifically, ultrasonication at 4W for 30 days increased biohydrogen production by 3.05-fold compared to the control, corresponding to hydrogen conversion efficiency of 58.4%; enhanced volatile fatty acid production by 2.49-fold; and increased acidification to 76.43%. The observed effect of ultrasound was linked to enrichment with hydrogen-producing acidogens such as Firmicutes, whose proportion increased from 61.9% (control) to 86.22% (4W, 30 days) and 97.53% (2W, 30 days), as well as inhibition of methanogens. This result demonstrates the positive effect of ultrasound on the acidogenic conversion of wastewater to biohydrogen and volatile fatty acid production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Applied microbiology, Biological waste treatment, Biotechnology
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-96652 (URN)10.1016/j.isci.2023.106519 (DOI)2-s2.0-85152128041 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018-00818
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-04-18 (hanlid)

Available from: 2023-04-18 Created: 2023-04-18 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sarkar, O., Santosh, J., Mohan, S. V. & Chang, Y.-C. (2023). Waste-Derived Biohydrogen Enriched CNG/Biohythane: Research Trend and Utilities (1ed.). In: Rena, Sunil Kumar (Ed.), Biofuels: Technologies, Policies, and Opportunities: (pp. 333-354). Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waste-Derived Biohydrogen Enriched CNG/Biohythane: Research Trend and Utilities
2023 (English)In: Biofuels: Technologies, Policies, and Opportunities / [ed] Rena, Sunil Kumar, Taylor & Francis, 2023, 1, p. 333-354Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Global transportation demand has grown significantly because of rising urbanization and industrialization, together with a concentration of automobiles. The transportation industry's reliance on fossil fuels has increased concerns about sustainability and the environment. On the other side, climate change, global warming, and rising fuel prices have compelled us to seek alternative fuel production technologies in a sustainable manner. The development of renewable and low-carbon energy sources has gained momentum in response to growing petroleum shortages and the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on the planet. Hydrogen (H2)-blended methane (CH4)/compressed natural gas (CNG), which mimics hythane is emerging as an energy carrier for combustion engines due to its cost efficiency and energy reductions. Compared to methane, hythane can lower the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) up to 30% and 50% respectively. With economic and environmental benefits, hythane is expected to take a long journey, since the blend is in direct use with the existing vehicle engines and has been commercialized as vehicle fuel. Currently CNG is being enriched with H2 (H-CNG) to enhance combustion efficiency. Biogenic waste transformation to H-CNG as fuel has proven to be an emerging solution to enable this goal. Acidogenic fermentation coupled with anaerobic digestion can be a potential technology for the production of hydrogen and methane towards bioH2-CNG/biohythane production from biogenic waste/wastewater as feedstock. This chapter aims to provide an updated overview of the recent advances in biohythane/bioH2-CNG production and usage as fuel.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023 Edition: 1
National Category
Energy Engineering Energy Systems
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-99492 (URN)10.1201/9781003197737-21 (DOI)2-s2.0-85165330144 (Scopus ID)978-1-032-05482-7 (ISBN)978-1-003-19773-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-08-11 Created: 2023-08-11 Last updated: 2023-08-11Bibliographically approved
Sarkar, O., Modestra, J. A., Rova, U., Christakopoulos, P. & Matsakas, L. (2023). Waste-Derived Renewable Hydrogen and Methane: Towards a Potential Energy Transition Solution. Fermentation, 9(4), Article ID 368.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waste-Derived Renewable Hydrogen and Methane: Towards a Potential Energy Transition Solution
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2023 (English)In: Fermentation, E-ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 9, no 4, article id 368Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an environmentally friendly process for recovering low-carbon energy from the breakdown of organic substrates. In recent years, AD has undergone a major paradigm shift, and now the technology is not only considered as a “waste treatment” method and is instead viewed as a key enabler of the future “circular economy” with its potential for resource recovery (low-carbon energy, safe water, and nutrients). Currently, waste-derived biogas from AD is the most affordable and scalable source of renewable energy. Biomethane (upgraded biogas) can serve as a significant renewable and dispatchable energy source for combating the problem of global warming. Acidogenesis, an intermediate step of AD, can produce molecular hydrogen (H2) along with green chemicals/platform chemicals. The use of low-carbon hydrogen as a clean energy source is on the rise throughout the world, and is currently considered a potential alternative energy source that can contribute to the transition to a carbon-neutral future. In order to determine the future trade routes for hydrogen, nations are developing hydrogen policies, and various agreements. Hydrogen produced by biological routes has been found to be suitable due to its potential as a green energy source that is carbon neutral for the developing “Hydrogen Economy”. Recently, hydrogen blended with methane to a specific proportion and known as biohythane/hydrogen-enriched compressed natural gas (HCNG) has emerged as a promising clean fuel that can substantially contribute to an integrated net-zero energy system. This review provides an overview of the current state of fermentative hydrogen and methane production from biogenic waste/wastewater in a biorefinery approach and its utilization in the context of energy transition. The limitations and economic viability of the process, which are crucial challenges associated with biohydrogen/biomethane production, are discussed, along with its utilization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
acidogenic fermentation, anaerobic digestion, biorefinery, energy transition, renewable hydrogen, waste
National Category
Energy Systems Energy Engineering
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-97071 (URN)10.3390/fermentation9040368 (DOI)000977324400001 ()2-s2.0-85153886243 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-05-10 (hanlid)

Available from: 2023-05-10 Created: 2023-05-10 Last updated: 2024-03-07Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2568-2979

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