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Toxic elements in arctic and sub-arctic brown bears: Blood concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in relation to diet, age, and human footprint
Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, 2480 Koppang, Norway.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3412-3490
National Park Service, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, 99709 Fairbanks, Alaska, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8420-7452
National Park Service, Alaska Regional Office, 99501 Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, 2480 Koppang, Norway.
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2023 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 229, article id 115952Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contamination with arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) is a global concern impairing resilience of organisms and ecosystems. Proximity to emission sources increases exposure risk but remoteness does not alleviate it. These toxic elements are transported in atmospheric and oceanic pathways and accumulate in organisms. Mercury accumulates in higher trophic levels. Brown bears (Ursus arctos), which often live in remote areas, are long-lived omnivores, feeding on salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and berries (Vaccinium spp.), resources also consumed by humans.

We measured blood concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in bears (n = 72) four years and older in Scandinavia and three national parks in Alaska, USA (Lake Clark, Katmai and Gates of the Arctic) using high-resolution, inductively-coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. Age and sex of the bears, as well as the typical population level diet was associated with blood element concentrations using generalized linear regression models.

Alaskan bears consuming salmon had higher Hg blood concentrations compared to Scandinavian bears feeding on berries, ants (Formica spp.) and moose (Alces). Cadmium and Pb blood concentrations were higher in Scandinavian bears than in Alaskan bears. Bears using marine food sources, in addition to salmon in Katmai, had higher As blood concentrations than bears in Scandinavia. Blood concentrations of Cd and Pb, as well as for As in female bears increased with age. Arsenic in males and Hg concentrations decreased with age.

We detected elevated levels of toxic elements in bears from landscapes that are among the most pristine on the planet. Sources are unknown but anthropogenic emissions are most likely involved. All study areas face upcoming change: Increasing tourism and mining in Alaska and more intensive forestry in Scandinavia, combined with global climate change in both regions. Baseline contaminant concentrations as presented here are important knowledge in our changing world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press Inc. , 2023. Vol. 229, article id 115952
Keywords [en]
Boreal, Contaminants, Grizzly bear, Pollution, Trace elements, Ursidae
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Research subject
Applied Geochemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-97063DOI: 10.1016/j.envres.2023.115952ISI: 001044366200001PubMedID: 37116674Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85154030079OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-97063DiVA, id: diva2:1756082
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
Note

Validerad;2023;Nivå 2;2023-05-10 (joosat);

Funder: Research Council of Norway; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences; Norwegian Environment Agency (grant number 19047048); National Park Service

License fulltext: CC BY

Available from: 2023-05-10 Created: 2023-05-10 Last updated: 2024-03-09Bibliographically approved

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Rodushkin, Ilia

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