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Writers from elsewhere: an examination of three post-colonial works: Burger's Daughter by Nadine Gordimer, Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie and Wild Cat Falling by Mudrooroo
2003 (engelsk)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
Abstract [en]

The all-embracing banner of post-colonialism imposes many questions, which in their turn impose an even greater number of answers: every single critic seems to have their own definition of what post-colonialism represents. This essay will not add an additional definition but merely discuss some of the existing explanations in order to make a comprehendible overview of the somewhat diffuse concept of post-colonialism. Thereafter, it will discuss three literary works: Burger’s Daughter by Nadine Gordimer, Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie, and Wild Cat Falling by Mudrooroo, and in which sense these works are, or are not, post-colonial. What do they have in common? What makes them different from each other? These authors are chosen because they all represent post-colonial literature in very different ways: Rushdie living as an exile in Britain writing about India and Pakistan: Gordimer as a white ‘colonizer’ in the former apartheid-state of South Africa, and Mudrooroo as belonging to the oppressed colonized Aboriginals of Australia. The aim of this essay is thus twofold: firstly to analyse the concept of post-colonial literature in English, in order to establish the conditions within which post-colonial writers usually work: that is, their major themes and how they use English in an effort to claim it as a language of their own. Moreover, the intention is also to show how two of the three authors analysed, Rushdie and Mudrooroo, are included within this literary genre simply because of their background as members of indigenous peoples, whereas Gordimer, most often, is excluded from this genre due to the reason that she is one of the white ‘colonizers’ of South Africa. This essay attempts to prove that the three particular works by Gordimer, Rushdie, and Mudrooroo under discussion are indeed post-colonial in their essence, that is, they contain the specific features and themes of post-colonial works, and that these features should conclude whether the work can be defined as part of the post-colonial movement.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2003.
Emneord [en]
Social Behaviour Law, English, Literature
Emneord [sv]
Samhälls-, beteendevetenskap, juridik
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-43664ISRN: LTU-C/DUPP--03/09--SELokal ID: 1819c0b7-72c1-4025-b625-c30ec9ed0a31OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-43664DiVA, id: diva2:1016904
Fag / kurs
Student thesis, at least 15 credits
Utdanningsprogram
English, master's level
Examiner
Merknad
Validerat; 20101217 (root)Tilgjengelig fra: 2016-10-04 Laget: 2016-10-04bibliografisk kontrollert

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