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 Personal Factors Important to People with Rheumatoid Arthritis and their Coverage by Patient-Reported Outcome Measures
Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna.
Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Research Unit for Bio Psychosocial Health, Marchioninistraße 17, 81377, Munich.
Medical University of Vienna, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
Medical University of Vienna, Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Diabetology, Medical University of Vienna.
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2015 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 73, no Suppl. 2, p. 894-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background There is an increasing call to use patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) in health outcome research, because the perspective of patients is an essential part concerning the end results of health care. The coverage of patients' perspective by PROMs relevant in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been examined regarding all domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) except personal factors (PFs). Since the ICF did not classify PF, some researchers attempted to provide a classification of the PFs. Objectives We aimed to identify themes meaningful to people with RA, to determine which of these were attributed to PFs previously and to explore their coverage by PROMs. Methods We explored life stories to identify themes meaningful to people with RA and determined whether they have been previously attributed to PFs in the existing literature. Additionally we conducted a systematic literature search to identify PROMs relevant in RA. Finally, we explored whether the identified PROMs cover those themes which were attributed PFs previously. Results Twenty-two themes were found to be meaningful to 15 people with RA, of which 13 were attributed to PFs previously. Five themes were linked to activity and participation or environmental factors and four were not covered by the ICF. The systematic literature search resulted in the identification of 33 PROMs. Of these, the London Coping with Rheumatoid Arthritis Questionnaire and the Rheumatoid Arthritis Self-Efficacy Questionnaire covered most PFs. Examples of the coverage of themes attributed to PFs by PROMs are depicted at the Table 1.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 73, no Suppl. 2, p. 894-
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-28024DOI: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-eular.3154ISI: 000346919805079Local ID: 1abcc48d-6ba0-43bc-bbf3-6b6d3a6e01c4OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-28024DiVA, id: diva2:1001217
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology : 11/06/2014 - 14/06/2014
Note
Godkänd; 2015; 20150529 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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