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Increasing Transparency and Privacy for Online Social Network Users: USEMP Value Model, Scoring Framework and Legal
CEA, Paris.
Radboud University, Nijmegen.
iMinds-SMIT, Etterbeek.
iMinds-SMIT, Etterbeek.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 162016 (English)In: Privacy Technologies and Policy: Third Annual Privacy Forum, APF 2015, Luxembourg, Luxembourg, October 7-8, 2015, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Bettina Berendt; Thomas Engel; Demosthenes Ikonomou; Daniel Le Métayer; Stefan Schiffner, Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2016, p. 38-59Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present research results from the multi-disciplinary EU research project USEMP (USEMP is a project funded from EU research framework, additional information about project scope and deliverables are available at project’s public website at: http://​www.​usemp-project.​eu/​). In particular, we look at the legal aspects of personal data licensing and profile transparency, the development of a personal data value model in Online Social Networks (OSNs) and the development of disclosure scoring and personal data value frameworks. In the first part of the paper we show how personal data usage licensing and profile transparency for OSN activities provides for Data Protection by Design (DPbD). We also present an overview of the existing personal data monetization ecosystem in OSNs and its possible evolutions for increasing privacy and transparency for consumers about their OSN presence. In the last part of the paper, we describe the USEMP scoring framework for personal information disclosure and data value that can assist users to better perceive how their privacy is affected by their OSN presence and what the value of their OSN activities is.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2016. p. 38-59
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743 ; 9484
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Information systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-38248DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-31456-3_3Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84961219092Local ID: c93a49a4-3b47-4983-9333-35c22ff7ad36ISBN: 978-3-319-31455-6 (print)ISBN: 978-3-319-31456-3 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-38248DiVA, id: diva2:1011747
Conference
Annual Privacy Forum : 07/10/2015 - 08/10/2015
Note

För godkännande; 2016; 20160314 (alipad)

Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Exploring Impacts of Secondary Information Use on Individual Privacy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring Impacts of Secondary Information Use on Individual Privacy
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Utforskar implikationer av användandet av sekundärdata påindividens integritet
Abstract [en]

Information collected from individuals via online social networks and Internet of things devices can be used by institutions and service providers for different business purposes to tailor and customize their services, which is defined as secondary use of information. Although the literature on secondary use is well developed, prior studies have largely focused on direct use of information such as those instances of information use that do not stem from data mining. Advances in data mining and information-processing techniques facilitate discovery of customers’ and users’ behaviors and needs. Research shows that individuals’ behavior can be inferred with high accuracy from their shared information, which may in turn jeopardize privacy. A recent scandal of Cambridge Analytica using about 87 million Facebook profiles to target those users with customized micro-targeted political ads has created public outrage and raised criticisms of secondary use. Given this background, the purpose of this thesis is to explore impacts of organizations’ and service providers’ secondary use of personal information in order to draw conclusions related to how individuals’ attitudes are formed and what role secondary use plays in managing privacy.

This research investigates user awareness and attitudes towards potential secondary uses of information. To pursue this, a multi-method qualitative approach using a descriptive questionnaire with 1000 European citizens and a total of 10 focus groups with 43 participants was employed. A qualitative content analysis using both inductive and deductive approaches was conducted to analyze the results. The conceptual framework employed in this thesis was genres of disclosure.

The research results suggest that user awareness of the potential for indirect personal information disclosure was relatively low. It was consequently found that participant attitudes toward privacy and disclosure shifted from affective to cognitive when they experienced firsthand the potential inferences that could be made from their own data. Generally, the participant users only considered their direct disclosure of information; through observing potential indirect inferences about their own shared contents and information, however, the participants became more aware of potential infringements on their privacy.

The study contributes to information privacy and information systems literature by raising understanding of the impacts of secondary use, in particular its effects on individual privacy management. In addition, this thesis suggests that information privacy is affected differently by direct and indirect uses. Its contribution to information privacy research is to complement previous methodological approaches by suggesting that if users are made aware of indirect inferences that can be made from their content, negative affective responses decrease while cognitive reactions increase through the processing of information related to their disclosure genres. The reason is that indirect use of information inhibits the negotiation of information privacy boundaries and creating unresolved tensions within those boundaries. Cognitive awareness of inferences made to individual information significantly affects the privacy decision-making process. The implication is that there is a need for more dynamic privacy awareness mechanisms that can empower users by providing them with increased awareness of the indirect information they are sharing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2018
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
National Category
Information Systems Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Information systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68991 (URN)978-91-7790-158-7 (ISBN)978-91-7790-159-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-09-26, A3012, Luleå, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved

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Padyab, Ali

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