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Selective Blockchain Transaction Pruning and State Derivability
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9865-8753
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4031-2872
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
2018 (English)In: 2018 Crypto Valley Conference on Blockchain Technology: CVCBT 2018, 2018, p. 31-40Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Distributed ledger technologies, such as blockchain systems, have in recent years emerged as promising platforms for machine-to-machine commerce and other forms of multi-stakeholder applications. However, despite the potential demonstrated by projects such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Hyperledger Fabric, the disk space typically required to host a copy of a ledger may be prohibitively large for many categories of devices. In this paper, we introduce an approach for reducing ledger size in blockchain systems, based on arbitrary pruning predicate functions, allowing each network participant to independently select and remove any already applied transactions. We also show that if only pruning certain ledger transactions, the ability to derive an unmodified state data structure from the remaining transactions is maintained. The approach is validated through a supply chain use case utilizing a modified version of Hyperledger Fabric, in which ledger size is reduced by about 84.49% via selective transaction pruning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. p. 31-40
Keywords [en]
blockchain, transaction pruning, disk usage, application state, database, distributed
National Category
Computer Systems
Research subject
Industrial Electronics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-72435DOI: 10.1109/CVCBT.2018.00009ISI: 000466595100004Scopus ID: 57193322103ISBN: 978-1-5386-7205-1 (print)ISBN: 978-1-5386-7204-4 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-72435DiVA, id: diva2:1275025
Conference
2018 Crypto Valley Conference on Blockchain Technology (CVCBT), JUN 20-22, Zug, SWITZERLAND
Projects
Productive 4.0Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-08-05Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The Performance, Interoperability and Integration of Distributed Ledger Technologies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Performance, Interoperability and Integration of Distributed Ledger Technologies
2019 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the wake of the financial crisis of 2008, Bitcoin emerged as a radical new alternative to the fiat currencies of the traditional banking sector. Through the use of a novel kind of probabilistic consensus algorithm, Bitcoin proved it possible to guarantee the integrity of a digital currency by relying on network majority votes instead of trusted institutions. By showing that it was technically feasible to, at least to some extent, replace the entire banking sector with computers, many significant actors started asking what else this new technology could help automate. A subsequent, seemingly inevitable, wave of efforts produced a multitude of new distributed ledger systems, architectures and applications, all somehow attempting to leverage distributed consensus algorithms to replace trusted intermediaries, facilitating value ownership, transfer and regulation.

In this thesis, we scrutinize distributed ledger technologies in terms of how they could help facilitate the digitization of contractual cooperation, especially in the context of the supply chain and manufacturing industries. Concretely, we consider them from three distinct technical perspectives, (1) performance, (2) interoperability and (3) integration. Voting systems, with or without probabilistic mechanisms, require significant time and resources to operate, for which reason it becomes relevant to investigate how the costs of running those systems can be mitigated. In particular, we consider how a blockchain, a form of distributed ledger, can be pruned to in order to reduce disk space requirements. Furthermore, no technical system part of a larger business is an island, but will have to be able to interoperate with other systems to maximize the opportunity for automation. For this reason, we also consider how transparent message translation between systems could be facilitated, as well as presenting a formalism for expressing the syntactic structure of message payloads. Finally, we propose a concrete architecture, the Exchange Network, that models contractual interactions as negotiations about token exchanges rather than as function invocations and state machine transitions, which we argue lowers the barrier to compatibility with conventional legal and business practices.

Even if no more trusted institutions could be replaced by any forthcoming distributed ledger technologies, we believe contractual interactions becoming more digital would lead to an increased opportunity for using computers to monitor, assist or even directly participate in the negotiation, management and tracking of business agreements, which we see as more than enough to warrant the cost of further developing of the technology. Such computer involvement may not just save time and reduce costs, but could also enable new kinds of computer-driven economies. In the long run, this may enable new levels of resource optimization, and not just within large organizations, but also smaller companies, or even the homes of families and individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2019
Series
Licentiate thesis / Luleå University of Technology, ISSN 1402-1757
Keywords
blockchain, distributed ledger, distributed ledger technologies, industry 4.0, smart industries
National Category
Computer Systems
Research subject
Industrial Electronics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-74046 (URN)978-91-7790-402-1 (ISBN)978-91-7790-403-8 (ISBN)
Presentation
2019-08-28, A1545, A-Huset, Luleå Universitet, 971 87, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textScopushttps://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8525390

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Palm, EmanuelSchelén, OlovBodin, Ulf

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